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New T owner, help!

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by HarleyTmama2018, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnolord Active Member

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    The wood slanted on the side will only encourage climbing, not what your aiming for with terrestrials. While your in there adding more sub, partially bury the wood and excavate a small entrance for your spider, makes for a much better hide that way...and will give your enclosure a nice natural look.
     
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  2. Andrea82

    Andrea82 Arachnoking Active Member

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  3. chanda

    chanda Arachnoangel Active Member

    Many terrestrial tarantulas like to "carpet" their homes with a layer of webbing over the substrate. If you notice her laying down webbing on the ground, hide, or bark, just leave it be - it is not something that needs to be cleaned out, even if it does look a bit untidy. Many of my spiders - including my B. albopilosum and B. hamorii - have carpeted significant portions of their enclosures. The webbing makes the substrate feel more stable underfoot and prevents it from shifting as they walk or allowing them to sink into it. They only time I clean it out is when they web up the water dish, beause even a tiny bit of webbing will wick the water out of the dish, leaving a perpetually empty dish and swampy substrate. Of course, it's a never ending (and probably losing) battle, because they keep webbing it up again anyway! When I rehoused the hamorii, I noticed that she initially spent most of her time on top of her hide - but once she laid the carpet, she came down and spent more time on the ground.
     
  4. darkness975

    darkness975 a Dream Within a Dream Arachnosupporter

    Good start for sure, especially from where it came from. As others have said though, more substrate and a hide cut in half (terracotta pot, cork bark, etc.) to allow it to burrow down if it chooses are what you want to aim for. I would also lay that piece of wood on its side.

    Here is mine. The simpler the better.
     
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  5. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Trust me, I'm not a fan of the plastic hide either because it's ugly and unnatural... it's what we had on hand for now and yes, it's only a half not full pvc (no sharp edges)as far as thebsubstrate, I tried to pack it down by hand but still feels pretty unstable. Do I mist it lightly to pack it better but not make it too wet? She has one foot down on it ty now lol thank you everyone for your help (and humor lol)!
     
  6. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Ohhh, the typos...apologies!
     
  7. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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  8. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    It's actally a part of a dryer vent kit lol it has no bottom. We are shopping for more appropriate things after this storm moves through lol no worries thank you!
     
  9. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    I'm a little overwhelmed trying to navigate thsee biards
     
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  10. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Oh my lord...lol trying to navigate these boards and trying to learn all of the terminology is overwhelming!
     
  11. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    What is the best way to pack the substrate to make it more stable?
     
  12. Andrea82

    Andrea82 Arachnoking Active Member

    Take it easy, you're doing everything you can already. She'll survive a few days in this set up.
    If my supply of substrate gets really wet i spray it with some warm water, lightly, and mix the substrate. You could do this in the enclosure but you'll be having your G.rosea up on the walls and bark for sure. You can pack it really well like that so maybe that's worth it :)
    You could just wait to get everything you need together and fix her tank in one go, that will be the least stressful for both you and your spider. She'll need time to acclimatize after that so just top off her waterdish and leave her alone for a couple of days after you've finished.
     
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  13. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    15157911365941699866920.jpg
     
  14. HarleyTmama2018

    HarleyTmama2018 Arachnopeon Active Member

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  15. Andrea82

    Andrea82 Arachnoking Active Member

  16. Deb60

    Deb60 Arachnosquire

    You get used to it , even I’m not that great after being a member for a while now
     
  17. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnolord Active Member

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    If it's bone dry, it won't pack down as well. Slightly moisten the sub and then mix it all up...should compact perfectly after that. Obviously remove the spider beforehand. The sub will dry out within a few days, no big deal. ;)
     
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  18. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    Well first off, rose hairs rarely burrow in captivity. Don't expect it.

    That said, the only way that sub will hold up to a burrow, is if its packed down tightly.

    NEVER mist...under any circumstances. The water dish should be the only water that enclosure ever sees.

    Just press it down with your hands.

    While it looks much much better, it still needs a lot more substrate. With a tank like that, you will want to fill it at least halfway with substrate...gonna take a lot of it.
     
  19. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Let's examine a few things

    Bald spots not always caused by stress- could be a molt, they do lay setae down for a molting mat.

    Subtrate: Well they do live in the wild on much harder substrate than cocofiber, RIGHT? ;) , and out in nature the substrate isn't as soft as cocofiber. I have many Ts living on that sub. They all react the same initially-- they don't like it it's too soft, they sink into it a bit, despite packing it on. I have some one T that typically stays on her cork slab until she gets used to the fiber. So the fact your T is on the logs is no surprise at all.

    She may or may not come down. I would give her a more firm substrate necessary.
     
  20. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Much too little sub. The distance from sub to tank cover should be no more than 1.5x Diagonal Leg Span to prevent fall injury/death.
     
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