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New Comer First time Pink Toe Terrarium

Discussion in 'Vivariums and Terrariums' started by Screamapillar, May 30, 2019.

  1. Screamapillar

    Screamapillar Arachnopeon

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    Hello all, I've been lurking these forums for a good month or so now, dating to the posts back to 2007 on some really good care threads. Which includes the beginners care big post. I've done what I think would be best for my pink toe. Substrate is a dry mix with some dirt from outback. I took out, what I think were termites (white ants) and small worms in the soil. Given water, and clutter to web in. I think I have a Avic Avic. It was bought from Petco, given I didn't have a good idea on where to start besides bread in captivity.

    Now for my concerns.

    1. Is the below terrarium too big, or just right? Can I do more to encourage it to use the leaves or sticks instead of being cooped up in the corner. Where unfortunately, I will have to open either from the front or from the top to refresh water. I believe it is a 2" juvenile atm. No idea when the next molt will be.

    2. I'm not positive it is actually getting water for itself, which I have placed at the bottom in a pill cap. I have added a humidifier both for myself and the T. I am living in a 2nd floor bedroom that can get stuffy with my PC during gaming times It will later be worse in the summer months. MN weather. Using the house AC is an option, I just don't like using it when the temp is cool everywhere else in the house.

    3. I did see it eat once, last week. I'm guessing the feeding schedule is either once a week, or every two. We'll see if the cricket is taken care of later tonight, since last feeding was 7 days ago. I'm a little worried, it will just starve itself sitting in that corner content.

    From this information, should I modify the enclosure more to encourage climbing onto the branches and what not or leave it be?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    Well, basically it made its web in that top corner because you didn't provide it the cover or wood in the location it wanted or needed to live. And that would be the very top.

    Ideally the wood should be wide enough for the spider to spread out on and hunt from, and it should extend all the way to the top of the enclosure. The top, and only the top of the wood, should be thoroughly surrounded by plants. This provides not only cover, but anchor points with which to make its home. Without this the only thing it has is the top corners of the aquarium like it's set up now.

    The floor should be clear of any clutter as this species of tarantula will not use it and it will only serve to give feeders a hiding place. A clear floor makes for easier hunting for the spider.

    A water dish on the floor is just fine, tarantulas don't drink very much or very often. Water dish is a safety net for hydration more than anything.

    Once or twice a month you can sprits a light, and I mean a very light sprits of water on to the webbing or the wall of the enclosure. This is not for husbandry, but instead it's for an easy opportunity for drinking as they don't always want to come to the floor. That said they will come to the floor generally to hunt.

    Because of their preferred elevated living situation, as well as the fact that they seal themselves in a web tubes to molt, leaving crickets running around the enclosure are not the danger that they would be with almost any other genre of tarantula.

    Also, these are opportunistic feeders, which means they do not need to be fed on any sort of a set schedule. Some people feed once a week which is probably the most common, others feed twice a week, yet others feed twice or once a month. All of these feeding schedules can result in the same healthy tarantula.

    One thing important to note is that heavier feeding schedules will plump the spider faster, which will lead directly to longer pre molt fasts and more hiding away out of your view.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2019
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  3. Screamapillar

    Screamapillar Arachnopeon

    Ah well then, I'll take your advice best I can. It is this one linked below, which I saw for approval elsewhere in the forum. It has slits on the side door for breathing holes, and then yes the wire mesh up top. So goal should be, clear out some space, get a smooth ish piece of wood, and put plants fake or real which reach the top of the mesh. Would I need to worry about adding in spring tails for clean up, do those little white critters get out and get in the beds and such?

    Besides making my own cut glass, is there a better terrarium I should look into?

    Oh lastly, I have a roommate with a half wild cat who likes to paw at critter cubes a lot. I've done what I can to keep it grounded, but even with my slight tapping that sucker will move inches etc. I've made it so the cat won't try jumping up on the dresser at least.

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0041P5PBE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
     
  4. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

    That's a fine display enclosure.

    The only changes I make to Exo Terras are removing the foam background (it's cheap and just gives feeders a place to hide) and replacing or covering the mesh lid.

    Although not everyone agrees that that screen/mesh lids are hazardous for arboreals, I would personally replace or cover it.

    While arboreals are better climbers, their tarsal claws can still get stuck in a fine mesh. My Avicularia did seem to have trouble walking across the screen. Sometimes, she would pull her foot free and keep moving, but once she fell in the attempt. Fortunately, she landed in the water dish and was unharmed, but I took that for a warning and fixed it.



    A common replacement is acrylic with holes drilled into it. If you're handy, you can make an entirely new lid. If you're less handy, here is basin79's fix:


    See also: Replace screen tops!

    I devised an even easier fix, which I initially intended as temporary but kept using because it worked. I cut a square of very thin cotton from a worn-out bedsheet. I removed the screen lid, placed the sheet of cotton over it so that it covered the mesh, and then replaced the lid. The result is a sheet that is loosely draped below the mesh inside the cage.

    [​IMG]

    This effectively discourages my arboreals from climbing on the ceiling, as they seem to realize that they aren't getting secure footing. (I've seen them take a tentative step or two onto the cloth and then turn back.)
     
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  5. Screamapillar

    Screamapillar Arachnopeon

    I may go with the acrylic drill option, because that looks easier to me. Mine hasn't really bothered to touch the mesh much, but I have seen the risk. Any risk to Ts with midwest trees/wood? I remember something about cedar or another plant being harmful to them. You'll see I removed the foam background too, figured honestly it could be toxic. Well, I'll go through changes tomorrow, with more energy. I dunno if I have anything tall enough for it to use and anchor too, but we will see. No question becomes, open from side or top lol. Either way Avic is gonna be a bit stressed.
     
  6. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

    Most woods are OK, with the caveat that you want to be sure that what you are using has no harmful critters living in it or pesticide residue. Whatever you use, I would clean it and then bake it on a low temperature to remove excess moisture. (Moist wood often molds.)

    Many people recommend against using softwoods like cedar in invertebrate enclosures. (I have also seen this advice applied to fresh pine.) However, boina has questioned the validity of the assumption that if these materials affect the respiratory system of mammals and/or have insect-repellent properties that they will also be harmful to tarantulas. (I have personally observed spiders, webs, and egg sacs on pine trees.)
     
  7. Screamapillar

    Screamapillar Arachnopeon

    I made some re-adjustments and cleared the bottom leaf clutter. I think the T would really appreciate a flatter piece of log wood though. Paper towel cardboard roll may be another option too.

    Earlier last week, I discovered the cup did not have water. Even when I thought it did. Yes I know the current fake bush isn't tall enough and I haven't addressed the top yet. A real plant, would be better, but it would die where the case sits currently, other spots in the house, cats can get at it too easily. Big one likes to paw at the crickets a lot. We'll see how it settles in next several days after being coaxed over to the other side.

    T seems to outright ignore the current cricket, one is currently chilling just behind it, touching one of the back legs. I'm a little worried, it will bite the T, or heck this T could be in pre-molt.



    FurnitureMoved.jpg

    Update nope, back to that same corner, maybe I should just move the plant to the door side instead to encourage webbing it up.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2019
  8. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    That setup needs to be redone, it's horrible. Paper towel cardboard-- bad idea.

    Cork is best, flats especially, or tubes.
     
  9. Screamapillar

    Screamapillar Arachnopeon

    I was going to redo it, but the Pink Toe decided to molt instead. I think as of Wednesday or Thursday last week. Got plenty of water for it, when it needs to come down. Fangs aren't totally black yet. So I'm guessing I'll have to wait on feeding for a week or two right? Plan will be to setup leaves on top and replace the block of wood with a 12 inch fake plant too. Perhaps add a bamboo small wood hollow pipe. It is pretty happy in that one corner though.

    T is looking pretty thin though, I may drop a cricket in there tonight.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 25, 2019 at 9:04 AM
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  10. Jim Cricket

    Jim Cricket Arachnopeon

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    I would place a few water drops on or in its web immediately. They don’t always come down to drink right after a molt.
     
  11. Screamapillar

    Screamapillar Arachnopeon

    Just did now at your suggestions. Draft of anchor points is taped right now at the top, T really likes that corner though. I'll post my draft setup later this evening.