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Need help Identifying Heterometrus sp.

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Wesley Barnum, Jul 20, 2019.

  1. Wesley Barnum

    Wesley Barnum Arachnopeon Active Member

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    so I just picked up a unspecified Heterometrus species. Idk much about scorpions, so I couldn’t id it myself. I primarily work with T’s and other spiders. So to me they all look just the same lmao! Hopefully one of you Demi-gods of scorpion care can help me. Thank you
     

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  2. Wesley Barnum

    Wesley Barnum Arachnopeon Active Member

    From the looks of what I’ve seen, it could be Spinifer or Laoticust. But I’m just going off on the pictures I see.
     
  3. Collin Clary

    Collin Clary Arachnobaron Active Member

    H. petersii.
     
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  4. Wesley Barnum

    Wesley Barnum Arachnopeon Active Member

    Wow, I was far off lol. How can you tell?
     
  5. Collin Clary

    Collin Clary Arachnobaron Active Member

    There are four species of Heterometrus in the hobby that look extremely similar to each other: H. petersii, H. laoticus, H. spinifer, and H. longimanus.

    H. petersii is currently the most common species in the hobby (especially outside of SE Asia), however the other three do turn up on occasion. The recently described H. minotaurus may also make its way into the hobby at some point (depending on how successful I and a couple others are at breeding them).

    H. petersii and H. laoticus have dark telsons, rounder chela, and dorsal keels on the 5th metasomal segment that consist of relatively minute granules, while H. spinifer and H. longimanus usually have telsons that are lighter than their metasomas (usually red in adults, and various shades of yellow/orange as juveniles), narrower chela, and dorsal keels on the 5th metasomal segment that consist of relatively large, pointed granules.

    H. petersii and H. laoticus can be distinguished from each other in that H. petersii has granulation on the carapace and tergites while H. laoticus is totally devoid of any granulation, and H. petersii shows sexual dimorphism in that males have an enlarged tooth on the movable finger of the chela. Both species have a pectine tooth count of 15-19 in both sexes.

    H. spinifer and H. longimanus can be distinguished from each other in that H. spinifer has a pectine tooth count of 15-19 in both sexes, while H. longimanus has a pectine tooth count of 12-18 in both sexes. Sexual dimorphism in proportions of pedipalps in H. spinifer is not noticable, with chela slightly lobiform and a length to width ratio of 2.4-2.6 in both sexes. In H. longimanus on the other hand, the chela, patella, and femur of the pedipalps in males are narrower and more elongate than in females. Chela not lobiform in male, slightly lobiform in female. Length to width ratio of chela 3.3-4.4 in males, roughly 2.4 in females.

    Females of H. spinifer and H. longimanus are nearly indistinguishable from each other. Some small differences are that in H. spinifer the manus has smooth carinae forming irregular reticulations, while the manus of H. longimanus is sparsely tuberculate, and that while both species usually have the carapace with disc smooth and margins granulate, sometimes in H. longimanus the entire surface is granulate.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
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  6. Wesley Barnum

    Wesley Barnum Arachnopeon Active Member

    Yea there’s no way I could’ve figured this out on my own lmao! I appreciate it man. :) also thanks for the information.
     
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