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Mysterious king baboon death?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Ultum4Spiderz, Jun 25, 2018.

  1. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

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    This spider around 4-5” I had 4 or more years , when I moved it to a larger cage it did well at first. It looked plump and healthy til last week . Found it dead it either refused to eat dubias or fangs coulda been injured in molt?
    It had been refusing to burrow which I found unusual, didn’t get the chance to move it to a smaller container. R.I.P.
    Very unfortunate, majority of spiders are doing fine .
     
  2. spookyvibes

    spookyvibes Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Did you check the last molt to see if it successfully molted its sucking stomach?
     
  3. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    Could be a sucking stomach issue, but only if it hasn't managed to eat once since the last molt. If not, we can rule that out completely.

    I honestly suspect dehydration was the culprit. How dry were you keeping the sub? This species will fast in those instances...and people wrongly assume its another issue when they just need more moisture. The consensus on keeping them dry is all wrong, bottom layers of the sub should always stay somewhat moist.

    Often times they only drink directly from the sub as well, and ignore their water bowls completely. Can we see what your setup looked like?
     
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  4. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    15B627D4-2D6F-4F06-8373-8B8BE54F32A8.jpeg 69EA26C4-215A-4D18-9C62-6C42BB124912.jpeg 840C4EFB-D5DB-4A40-A5C6-2305AA0FD3AC.jpeg I tried to give it pre killed food also , recently saw it drinking from water bowl last week. Maybe the substrate wasn’t wet enough looks , but I always overfilling water dishes I’ll try and get a pic but I already took out the water bowls . And added a.hide for a much bigger spider, substrate was an few inches deeper too.

    Could too large of a tank stress out the spider ? For a 4.5” juv , it hasn’t ate much since last molt .
    Very saddened as I had a 15 years old n chromatis get stuck in its skin last month , what’s a better substrate then top soil? Seems to to be rough drys out fast.
    I dislike the steel lids on 10 gallons too horrible for humidity
     

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  5. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    Sorry to hear about that man.

    As for your setup, doesn't look good. Not nearly enough sub depth, and too much rocks/clumps and whatnot in your top soil...makes burrowing very difficult for your T.

    That water dish needs to be changed with something more shallow with a better surface area as well, its practically inaccessible like such.

    I cant zero in on your exact cause of death, but the enclosure was definitely setup all wrong.
     
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  6. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I've never heard of stress straight out killing a spider. I doubt the transfer did it.

    Maybe dehydration. Maybe some sort of overheating. Not alot that will kill a healthy spider so quickly you don't know what happened.
     
  7. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince

    There's alot of space between the lid and the substrate. Betcha it was exploring it's new enclosure, fell and suffered an internal injury.
     
  8. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Good points. Let me add also that (as far I can see) ventilation was minimum and I will never cease to repeat that, no matter, ventilation is essential.
     
  9. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    It did fine til I moved it to the basement a week or two ago. Which is 10-16 degrees colder but 65-70.

    Substrate was 2-3” deeper , but topsoil doesn’t seem to hold a burrow well. Hope someday i get another maybe I’ll go for a haplophelma first .
    The housing pic was post death wish ida not moved it and took pic . It was refusing to eat even dead Dubai’s , which it always ate fine til after latest molt.
    Very sad year, I might consider switching back to eco earth tho it’s much pricier , safer and softer.

    That could explain why it stopped eating.
    Perhaps your right I’m never using a cage with that much extra space again unless it’s a 7-8” adult.

    It’s old container was 10” of dirt or more , it’s like my housing skills went backwards. Just under so much stress lately gotta go back and reconfigure anything or any cage that has too much room on the top .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2018
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  10. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Maybe you used a brand with some tarantula killing chemicals? Happened to me once..
     
  11. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnoknight Active Member

    I would be attentive to the points made above about moisture in the substrate. There was a discussion thread a while back about P. Muticus emphasizing the necessity of moisture in the sub, which seemed a concept different than previously believed that a water bowl was sufficient. I actually learned a lot from that discussion. My specimen, a 5 inch female, had become very inactive after I got her. I only had a water dish in the enclosure. I actually complained about the species being boring, not eating well, etc.. After reading that thread I started pouring about a half cup (125 ml) of water down the entrance to her burrow every two weeks or so. I see her almost every night now poised at the entrance of her burrow, so she’s much more active. She is also now eating like a champ. There is no doubt in my mind that she had been dehydrated. Thankfully the situation was rectified before possibly fatal consequences.
     
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  12. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    A nothing, basically. I offer such size to normal 'genics'. Juve/adults obligate burrowers needs, at least, a minimum of 7/8, but in the case of species like P.muticus, H.gigas etc even 10 inches aren't exactly 'overkill'.
     
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  13. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    I mean 2-3” deeper then the picture so probably 5-6.5” still not enough depth even if it was more then it’s leg span.
    Maybe too many ventalation holes dried it out ?

    It was burrowing until the spiders last month. Next burrowed I get I’ll give 10” or so like I originally had in king baboons container. Just a mystery why it stopped eating? Maybe it injured its fangs?
     
  14. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Ah, ok, didn't get that :)

    Still 5/6 inches IMO are still a bit too low... can work, eh, because one moment, in life, everything can work, but a bit low.

    Anyway, speculating a bit, I agree with those that said a dehydration issue. The bottow/lower layers of their burrows/s needs to remain always moist. Nothing transcendental, but moist.

    However, the causes can be others, including mere '... bad luck, it's life' stuff.
     
  15. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    Maybe bad luck or something.
    I see no signs on or mold or anything , a few dead Dubai roach it refused to eat pre killed , or live. Maybe topsoil was too rough ? It needs broken up more . I’ve had just random deaths before I noticed my mom uses ant poison outside . But see no ants in any of my cages so can’t be that. I saw a outdoor cockroach somehow got inside , only I threw it outside .
    I doubt a house cetepede would ever wander inside a t cage , see loads of em indoors .
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018
  16. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    Poor baboon will be missed hope someday get another, can’t til I move out . Parents are anti T;(