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My young Cobalt Blue

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Jlw13194, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Jlw13194

    Jlw13194 Arachnopeon

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    Recently my Cobalt blue had a bad molt because I screwed up and had it a little too dry. It has since been adjusted and is much better. He lost a few limbs but is alive and active. Here are a few pictures. Do you guys think I have the substrate too moist? or not moist enough? Also do you think he is ready to eat? I read that I should wait up to a week or atleast until his fangs turn black and harden up. From what I can see his fangs are black and he keeps coming up so I'm assuming he's hungry and lastly is it possible to determine if male or female from either shot? IMG_0356[1].JPG IMG_0358[2].JPG
     
  2. ledzeppelin

    ledzeppelin Arachnobaron Active Member

    I have never kept lividums, but the substrate looks too damp to me.. This is something someone with experience in keeping them should address.

    As far as feeding goes, a T of that size will almost definitely be fine to feed after a week.
    Also why such a castle for such a little T? :p

    And for guessing its sex without a molt, we need a close up. I'd guess F.
     
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  3. Jlw13194

    Jlw13194 Arachnopeon

    I didn't really want to limit him to where he could dig so I just used an old enclosure I had. I like to spoil my T's anyway :p I'll definitely feed him on Wednesday or even Tuesday. Do you think he'll recover his limbs as he continues to grow?
     
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  4. mitty

    mitty Arachnopeon

    Yes, T's missing legs can grow them back with the next molt or so. If the T is active and acts fine, you shouldn't have anything to worry about. As far as the enclosure goes, it is quite big and spoiling a T with a nice big enclosure can actually make it difficult for them to find food. Just make sure you drop the crickets / feeding items near or into the burrow so the T knows it's there. Watch and make sure he/she eats. Smaller enclosures have a significantly higher chance of the prey running into the T which makes things easier. T's aren't going to complain too much if the enclosure isn't massive. As long as you give it enough substrate that it needs to burrow, it'll be perfectly content.
     
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  5. Jlw13194

    Jlw13194 Arachnopeon

    Yeah I completely agree with you about the food, I've been doing that every time. He seems to find it and eat just fine thankfully
     
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  6. KezyGLA

    KezyGLA Arachnoprince Active Member

    The sub is ok but needs to be much more in there to reduce risk of injury from fall.

    The fangs look black, which means ready for a meal.

    Remember to keep the substrate moist but not swamp like.
     
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  7. dopamine

    dopamine Arachnobaron Active Member

    A T that size would ideally be kept in a 64 oz deli container.
     
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  8. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoking Active Member

    The substrate is definitely too moist, not even my female S.subspinipes has a substrate so wet... and that enclosure is incredibly huge for a Theraphosidae so little.
     
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  9. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoking Active Member

    When it comes to South-East Asian Theraphosidae substrate should be moist, not wet, combined with a proper sized (therefore not so bigger) water dish, always full. If you find hard to mantain the moisture on the substrate leves, you can mix a "hint" of vermiculite fine grain (fine grain, not the rough one) to the substrate, this trick helps to mantain humidity in the long run.
     
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  10. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    You feed on black. There is no magic time limit for when they turn black. If you rely on time alone, you put your Ts life in jeopardy.
     
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  11. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

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    For some species though you can't look for black fangs. My I.mira would starve if I waited to see black fangs, after molting, before feeding. Depending on the size, if you give your T enough time to harden up it is usually fine.

    It's nice when you can see the black fangs but that's not always something you can do. For me it's easier to tell if the Ts exo is fully hardened up. Then a wait a few more days and feed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
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  12. KezyGLA

    KezyGLA Arachnoprince Active Member

    @Trenor Agreed. I wait for time depending on size for my pet holes too.
     
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  13. Jlw13194

    Jlw13194 Arachnopeon

    UPDATE
    He has eaten since the molt (Which I'm very thankful for since it was my first successful time feeding him since I got him.), he has now webbed off his burrow. Is there any reasons this species will do this after eating?
     
  14. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

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    It wants to be left alone. Most times this means it has enough food/water etc to make it to the next molt. Or it might just want to hide. They cover the entrance with web or dirt for more safety. Think of it as a "Do Not Disturb" sign and leave it be.
     
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  15. Jlw13194

    Jlw13194 Arachnopeon

    That's what I was thinking. Thanks for reassuring me. :p She's been doing so much better since I re-did the sub.
    Cheers mate
     
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