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My setup for hadrurus arizonensis

Discussion in 'Vivariums and Terrariums' started by soldierof4cheese, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

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    This is my attempt to recreate the desert environment of the south west. First I have a 55 gallon aquarium that i have had since my emperor breeding days, its a 55 long, so there is plenty of room. Next I ran a 1/4" vinyl tubing down the corner of the back side, leading into the center of the bottom of one side of the tank. Next i used super glue in small amounts to attach the tubing, next I cut a piece of PVC pipe 1/4" in half using a up-rite band saw, i cut the length of the PVC the same as the protruding tubing. The PVC is used to cover the vinyl tubing from being crushed by the weight of the 1 inch layer of small gravel stones that will cover the bottom of the tank. Next is the sand and clay mixture to cover the gravel, i used 1" inch or 2" of sand. I let it dry good for a few days, then the slate and stone hides and caves are built on top of the sand mixture. I use a hot glue gun to fasten everything together, that way it wont collapse and squish anyone. After the hides are built, then cover everything with more sand and clay mixture, let dry for a week, during the final sand and clay I will add some cacti and decorations to simulate their environment. The reason for the water tubing is to create a burrow or hide in one corner for molting, by using a squeeze bottle of distilled water , i can now add moisture to the bottom of the one hide, it is the deepest hide and the only one that has moisture in it. I may in the future if this works add a small metering pump to deliver the water, since the bottom layer of gravel has so much surface area, it will help disperse the moisture and aid in evaporation. The hood once built will have two low watt ceramic heaters for day time, to simulate the sun on the surface of the ground and at night a small stick on flat heater in the middle back of the tank to create a warm spot, a small warm spot. Since the desert gets cold at night in the winter months, room temperature would be fine at night and during the day the surface would be warmer. Its all theory at the moment and the build is under way, I will add pics this week, my slate should arrive this week and I can start the build on the hides. Hopefully molting in this tank for hadrurus arizonensis wont be a problem, if you have any comments or ideas please share. Thanks
     
  2. user 666

    user 666 Arachnoknight Active Member

    goodness, that is elaborate.

    I like the detail about the water source in the deepest burrow; it is geographically correct. I would do something like that except I can't build an enclosure that is big enough.
     
  3. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    I hope it will work, my main concern is the molting and if this can cure that issue I will expand upon this setup. I would like to do a setup for hadogenes trolodytes also.
    This day and age you could actually setup and automated system that uses a small PLC and a wireless connection to the internet that could simulate the conditions of their native environment.. A PLC could control your heat and water sources with a simple set of outputs. I dont think i will go that far but it is a cool thought..
     
  4. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

  5. vespers

    vespers Arachnolord Active Member

    Hadrurus likely won't care about any hides you build. They will create their own burrows wherever they see fit, and then when those burrows are done they will make more lol. Just make sure there is a sufficient depth of substrate, and they will create their own homes.
     
  6. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    Sounds good, I should then just bury my slate and stone structures and let then dig them out as they see fit. I will hot glue the structures so they don't collapse, there will be at least 6" of substrate once i am done. Thanks for the advice, I havent had a hadrurus in over twenty years, so its like starting new.
     
  7. user 666

    user 666 Arachnoknight Active Member

    I would at least make the one hide down at the water table, and dig a tunnel up. That way you know they will be able to find water.

    BTW, what are you using as a substrate?

    I have been experimenting but I haven't found an ideal mix yet.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2017
  8. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    The substrate is just white play sand and excavator mix, two parts sand to one part clay. The first layer has hardened nicely, should hold its shape good.. No slate yesterday, it will be at our local store today. I can pick it up tomorrow then get building, I post more pics once i start the build and bury.. Then i have to find a dealer for the Hadrurus, maybe they will have some down by Detroit, if not its mail order.
     
  9. user 666

    user 666 Arachnoknight Active Member

    That is what I started with, but I don't like the smell.

    My desert substrate is about 3 part play sand to 1 part coco fiber and 1 part excavator clay. I then bake it, which may have been a mistake. there's not enough water in the substrate, so it can't hold its shape. this means no tunneling.

    But on the upside I do think the texture and the coarseness is about right.
     
  10. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    I agree, the clay does have a strange smell, I hope it goes away in time. I have been pondering on the coco fiber around the one deep hide to help in the retain some moisture. Also after thinking about the deep hide, I wish I would have put in a small wall to keep the water at the one end of the tank, I may dig a trench to divide the wet from the dry, I will hot glue a 1/4" strip of plexiglass to keep the moisture at the one end.
     
  11. Greenjewls

    Greenjewls Arachnobaron

    Sometimes using 33% clay makes tunneling slower, you may get more tunnels faster at 15% clay. The solution to the molting problem is to buy adult Hadrurus... But I hope your watering system works as well. Coconut fiber seems pointless with Hadrurus I think you are wise to avoid it. I will be collecting some adult Hadrurus soon and I have blue death-feigning beetles if you need. Good luck and keep us posted!
     
  12. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    I am hoping to have an adult male and female or at least old enough to breed. We used to have a very unique pest store ten miles from my house but its gone now, he closed in the 90's I believe. The guy had everything from Gaboon vipers to monkeys and everything in between but since the electronics explosion and the internet seems people just aren't as interested anymore.
    Now I have to either drive to Detroit or buy mail order, hopefully when I am ready I could purchase from dealer on the forum and yes I am interested in the Blue death-Feigning beetles and thanks, I should be ready by the end of the month for my occupants.
    If my tank setup works I would like to provide good healthy scorps to collectors and not so much to the pet trade, I would fear the fate of the little guys in the hands of just anyone.. Thank you all for the advice and kindness.
     
  13. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    Tested the water tube yesterday and it worked great, the hide I created stayed nice and damp but not wet. I injected two ounces of distilled water into the gravel bed, which in-turn dampened the sand above it where the hide is. I added a small one inch wall to the bottom of the tank so the water will be kept to the hide side, so far it works great. No slate this week, so i am waiting to finish the tank, I am going to add a hygrometer to the hide area so I can monitor the humidity in the wet side (damp). Still have to build the hood yet, it will house two 60 watt ceramic heat elements to warm the surface of the substrate, this will be controlled by a temp controller, so it can be set for day time warmth, then a timer will shut it off at night. Going to eventually automate the whole thing, this is the prototype. I will post more pictures soon..
     
  14. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member

    Since the 55 gallon is going to the Hadogenes Troglodyte, I have built a small ten gallon tank for the Hadrurus, its the same as the 55 just allot smaller. I built the divider out of plexiglass and covered the water tube with 1/4 PVC pipe, next steps will be adding the sand/clay mixture and building the hood. I also added a 4 watt heater under the dry side, I tested it against my skin and it should be perfect, not to much heat. There will be a ceramic 25 watt nano above the damp side just to provide some heat from above. Should be able to make some progress after the 22nd of this month, maybe even get a occupant.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. soldierof4cheese

    soldierof4cheese Arachnosquire Active Member