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My ethmostigmus rubripes injured from prey fight

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by patrick nimbs, Aug 27, 2019.

  1. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Hi guys, well my 16cm ethmostigmus rubripes had an oversized grasshopper and the centipede took it down the wrong way and it kicked the centipede in the face, damaging one of its antennae. The damage is not life threatening as far as I know, but the antennae is healing and there is a black-blue mark at the wound site. I don’t know if it is bruising or is merely substrate that got caught in the wound after bleeding had ceased. Anyway, I just thought I would like to share this with you guys and I will of course welcome your feedback and helpful hints, because the ethmostigmus rubripes appears to be in a mass of pain, and I am pretty scared about it at the moment.
     
  2. Seeing as it's just the antenna, it won't be a serious wound. Just an inconvenience that'll heal up with a few molts, and seeing as your rubripes isn't especially large, it'll likely molt several more times in its life.

    Also, I recall you saying somewhere else that you measured the pede with terminal legs. That's not the correct way to measure a centipede (they're typically measured without terminal legs and antennae) so yours is more likely about 14cm.
     
  3. Outpost31Survivor

    Outpost31Survivor Arachnobaron Active Member

    Was the grasshopper wild caught? If so, never feed wild caught prey to a pet because it could be carrying parasites, both external or internal.

    Anyways, it should probably have its jumpers removed before being introduced to the pet, large or even medium sized grasshoppers can inflict serious damage.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Salvador

    Salvador Arachnosquire

    It'll most likely fine, I've had a few centipedes take a bite to the antennae before, and while they hate it, theres no long term effects. Along with the fact I don't particularly enjoy seeing inverts kicking away for 10 minutes while the centipede kills them (rare but happens, particularly with roaches), that's another reason I usually prekill feeders. It is important with a wound though, that your conditions are correct, and won't encourage bacteria or fungal infections. It's at that point it could lose the antenna or worse.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Outpost31Survivor

    Outpost31Survivor Arachnobaron Active Member


    I wouldn't worry about roaches and other insect feeders, it is mother nature at work. Roaches can live a week or longer without a head and die due to the fact obtaining water and food is no longer possible. They are simply tough SOBs and the given fact your venomous invert could be conserving its venom.

    But vertebrates are another matter entirely in my book.
     
  6. Salvador

    Salvador Arachnosquire

    I'm not really worried, it's just personal preference :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    The thing is I’ve tried prey that is already dead, but the centipede just turns its nose up at it! But yeah, I’ve been monitoring the centipede today every 1-2 hours then later every 2-3 hours and no signs of deterioration were setting in and I tested the damaged antennae and it still spazzes out when I touch it, so it is pretty lucky it’s minor and even more lucky it is still live and able to detect objects with the antennae’s tip!!
     
  8. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    I remeasured the pede today excluding the terminal legs and it measured about 14.5 cm, so yeah, and the damaged antennae still works top to bottom and the pede being monitored all day once every hour to two hours and everything is fine!! But yeah, I’ll be a lot more careful when feeding it from now on! Thanks for the reassurance by the way! You are totally right, the wound is not serious and to top it off, the whole antennae is still able to detect senses though the centipede seems to be more sensitive when I touch the damaged antennae.
     
  9. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    It has been monitored all day at every one to two hours, and there are no signs of discolouration, deterioration or rotting, but will be monitored every three to four hours for the next three to five days. But yeah, prekill could work and pay more attention to the size and never overestimate the capabilities of the centipede because it is lucky to have an antennae that is damaged and still works as good as the undamaged one, though more sensitive.
     
  10. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Well this morning I went to check my inverts and I find that my centipede appears to be dead. So as I was about to take its body out and prepare it for preservation (I preserve my deceased inverts in case you didn’t know), the centipede’s body starts moving sluggishly, I then fed it a roach and it wrestled it and devoured that in two minutes and then I cautiously touched its terminal legs and it spazzed out for about five seconds then it started to roam around its cage, like it usually does. Last night was cold and usually when it gets cold, it burrows into the substrate but yeah, I reckon it’s antennae is still a bit sensitive for it to burrow at the moment, but I think the exposure to the cold caused it to lapse into unconsciousness but fortunately didn’t get killed!!
     
  11. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    The actual centipede was obtained by me. So, technically it wouldn’t much matter if I fed it wild caught prey (which I do anyway because I detest spending money) and we are environmentally conscious. We never use chemicals in the garden and the food is caught in the local state forest which we, believe it or not, have our own access to it at the back of our property (because we are rural), so yeah, the forest is where I get new additions and food for absolutely nothing!!! But yeah, it’s lived it’s life under my care eating wild caught food straight from the forest and so does the funnel web spider, in fact any animal I keep is fed on food from the state forest because all of my inverts are and were legally caught in the state forest as well!! No harm whatsoever so don’t worry. But yeah you do have a point and I have taken that into account as well. Goodnight Outpost31survivor. Thanks for your feedback and reply. Much appreciated!!!!
     
  12. Outpost31Survivor

    Outpost31Survivor Arachnobaron Active Member

    Hey it's a great convenience considering your rural situation, I just wanted to put that out there that wild caught grasshoppers and similar wild caught prey items can carry mites (external) and nematodes (internal worms) that can be passed onto a pet.
     
  13. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Oh! Thanks for telling me. Well I fed the pede this afternoon a hopper and I checked it for mites and stuff but it wasn’t behaving abnormally so I assumed that it was safe for the centipede to eat. I’ll keep a lookout for side effects. If there are side effects, our local pet store has a vet who can help my centipede if needed!
     
  14. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Oh, for those of you who do not know, my ethmostigmus rubripes has a given name “Bob”. So if you refer to my centipede, please feel free to use the given name if you wish, because it was actually given a name. I think all pets ought to have a name, of course! Good night guys, and as always, I readily welcome replies and comments, so feel free to leave me a comment, feedback, a hint or tip would be much appreciated!! Have an excellent evening and night and I will get back to you guys as soon as possible!!
     
  15. Outpost31Survivor

    Outpost31Survivor Arachnobaron Active Member

    Okay, I respect your situation, but with wild caught prey you are playing Russian roulette and one time the chamber may just be loaded. Nematodes are particularly nasty requiring the destruction of the pet (usually euthanized in a freezer) and complete sterilization of the housing (meaning everything needs to be tossed into the trash with the exception of the container of course). These worms inhabit soil and enter an invertebrate's anus and multiply, in advance stages a visible ball of worms exit the mouth.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Right. I’d better adhere to your reply and not feed it any more hoppers and the like. I’ll be especially wary of that! Thanks for informing me about that. Much appreciated
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Scoly

    Scoly Arachnobaron Active Member

    If you caught the centipede and the grasshopper in the same area, its a pretty safe bet to assume those centipedes have been eating those grasshoppers for 1000's of years, so the odds of it carrying a parasite the centipede isn't equipped to handle is pretty slim. The risk of pathogens with wild caught food is greater when the prey is native to a totally different part of the world, and contains pathogens which the centipede isn't equipped to deal with.

    A sudden unexplained death is usually due to a pre-existing condition with the centipede, or husbandry issue. How were you keeping it?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Forgive me if I have misunderstood you but I do think that you are a bit mistaken. Not to be rude or anything but the centipede is still alive and there are no signs of approaching death or any health problems. And indications inside the enclosure also indicate that the centipede is live as well!
     
  19. Scoly

    Scoly Arachnobaron Active Member

    My bad!!!

    I read this bit:

    Skimmed the rest, and the thread seemed to be talking about him being dead (including the bit about referring to him as Bob).
     
  20. patrick nimbs

    patrick nimbs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Yes the centipede had a food coma (which was why it appeared dead) and yes, the centipede’s name is Bob.