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My carnivorous plants

Discussion in 'Live Plants' started by Benurmanii, Feb 23, 2017.

  1. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Yes, I admit I know nothing about growing Pinguicula, though it sounds like temperate Pinguicula are basically the same as sarracenia. However, the only CP I've ever seen wild were Pinguicula vulgaris on a hill in Iceland, and it was amazing.
     
  2. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnosquire

    In my opinion, the temperate Pinguicula are the most difficult temperate CP to grow, besides the south American and New Zealand temperate Drosera. The cold temperate Pinguicula do not tolerate high temps very well, and the warm temperates need a cold winter but no prolonged frosts and high humidity during frosts.
     
  3. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnosquire

    Pictures of P. hirtiflora, P. megaspilaea, and the seed pod from the cross I made between the two (hopefully it was successful). Also, the flowers of P. primuliflora 'Rose'.
    20170407_194839.jpg 20170407_194909.jpg 20170407_194926.jpg 20170406_220954.jpg 20170406_220959.jpg
     
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  4. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnosquire

    Part 1 of a buttload of pictures taken during the past few weeks
     

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  5. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnosquire

    Part 2
     

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  6. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnosquire

    Part 3
     

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  7. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnobaron Active Member

    Your pinguiculas are gorgeous--I always found them boring, but I may need to find some! And the sundews are beautiful as well.

    A question about D. filiformis (which I think you have in one of your pictures?): mine, instead of growing vertically as it's supposed to, often has the leaves grow at odd angles and fall over. It's otherwise quite healthy: large leaves with plenty of dew. Do you have any experience with a problem of this sort? I think it might be the angle of the lighting.
     
  8. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnosquire

    Mine get full sun but once they are well into the growing season they tend to get more floppy. These are just waking up, so the leaves seem to he more short and stout.
     
  9. keks

    keks Arachnopeon

    Wonderful plants and wonderful pictures :happy:.
    I love this plants, and I had some too, but no luck with them.
     
  10. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Awesome collection! I really need to try and expand my Pinguicula collection, Amazing plants.
     
  11. Xafron

    Xafron Arachnosquire Active Member

    Awesome collection. I love carnivorous plants, though I've pretty much given up on ever keeping them. They're beautiful and interesting.
     
  12. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Why have hou given up if I may ask?
     
  13. Xafron

    Xafron Arachnosquire Active Member

    Most sound like more work than I care to put into them. There is a local one I think that I could probably grow outside but other than that I doubt I'd try them again. Tried some years ago and didn't go well.
     
  14. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnobaron Active Member

    Some are really not too bad. For a lot of Drosera and Sarracenia, the only requirements are half and half peat/sand soil, very bright light, and constant standing water, as well as a winter rest. Whereabouts do you live? If it doesn't get cold enough for a winter rest, you can get tropical drosera instead.
     
  15. Xafron

    Xafron Arachnosquire Active Member

    Pacific Northwest. I have a window that gets decent light, but then that is somewhat dependent on the weather which isn't always the most consistent thing up here. Sand soil? Is that a thing you buy?
     
  16. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnobaron Active Member

    Outside is probably your best bet, if you can--the Pacific northwest has a great climate for a variety of species. Where exactly?

    I meant soil that is half peat and half sand. I, too, have never heard of sand soil.
     
  17. Xafron

    Xafron Arachnosquire Active Member

    I'm not far from Portland. I was actually at a plant fair recently where a guy was selling some. One of them is native to this region, but I didn't end up buying any.

    And ok haha. So then, two parts peat, one part soil, one part sand...is the kind of soil and sand important?
     
  18. Xafron

    Xafron Arachnosquire Active Member

    Also, are any of these good at catching ants? The tiny little ones. Just now occurred to me that I could potentially use these to help control the ants that get into the house.
     
  19. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnobaron Active Member

    For most cp's you want the substrate to be 50% peat and 50% sand, though there are certainly plenty of exceptions. In Portland you could grow most sarracenia, temperate sundews, and venus flytraps. Cobra lilies grow in the area as well, and it's a climate that would probably be good for cephalotus and roridula, but I wouldn't recommend those to a beginner. Cephalotus is also thought by some to specialize on ants, although this claim has been disputed.
     
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  20. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight Active Member

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    There are quite a few easy to grow CP's you could grow in your climate @Xafron
    As for ant control, I don't know any plant that will completely eliminate your ant problem, you will most likely have to resort to some other means of control.

    @Xafron Check out these guys, the are in the Pacific Northwest
    https://www.youtube.com/user/SarraceniaNorthwest
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2017 at 10:45 AM