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Must haves for a collection

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Troopermk2, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. Troopermk2

    Troopermk2 Arachnosquire Active Member

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    So now that i am comfortable that i can care for my T's, having had no issues so far im wondering what you guys would recommend for a Semi novice level keeper.

    So far my collection includes:
    x2 A.Geniculata
    Davus Pentaloris
    B.Vagans
    B.Emilia
    B.Smithi/hamorii (would love some confirmation of the name of this species)


    I have my eye on Avicularia Versicolor and Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens but more suggestions would be most welcome
     
  2. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    I'm gonna say Psalmopoeus cambrigei so I get a bunch of likes and agrees. :shifty:
     
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  3. Troopermk2

    Troopermk2 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Did some quick research on this species, looks like they are a more advanced species from what i have currently, a good step up from the brachys, quite a bit faster and quite a bit more aggressive, is this correct?
     
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  4. sasker

    sasker Arachnoknight Active Member

    What you need is a Pamphobeteus sp. :) You already have two A. geniculata, so you are familiar with a great feeding response already. Pamphos get big and are great display spiders. My P. sp mascara is absolutely my favourite spider.
     
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  5. Troopermk2

    Troopermk2 Arachnosquire Active Member

    That has an absolutely amazing color!, I was looking at Xenethis Sp purely because of the purple coloration but they seem very rare in the hobby, this is beautiful, ill be adding this to my wishlist :), thank you!
     
  6. JoshDM020

    JoshDM020 Arachnoknight Active Member

    P. cambridgei isnt really advanced in the same sense as an OBT or other old worlds. Generally the calmest Psalmopoeus.
    Psalmopoeus are super easy to care for. Theyre just fast if provoked and have stronger venom than most other new worlds. Definitely a must have.
    You could get the versicolor first so you can get used to the ways of arboreals, if youre concerned. Attitude wise, its basically the A. geniculata of the trees.
    Otherwise, id say your list already has most of what people call "hobby classics".
     
  7. Troopermk2

    Troopermk2 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Yea, i really wanted to start off with genuine "beginner" species to get used to feeding, rehousing, behaviors etc, but having quite a few brachy slings with that lovely shade of brown just makes me want something a bit more colorful, as soon as i got the D.penta with that awesome orange color i knew i needed a rainbow of T's!
     
  8. Sergic

    Sergic Arachnopeon

    You've already got your eye on the GBB, which would have been my first suggestion.

    If you want something colorful that's a genuine beginner species, look into Aphonopelma seemani, especially the blue color form.
     
  9. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    Pamphs rule!
    Keep in mind with Pamphobetus and Phormictipus, that you only see that bright purple in males, and even then, only once they have matured.

    This is a female Pamph....the brown look is pre-molt.
    ---

    Now some great ones more like what you might be looking for....

    C. versicolor. One of the more forgiving Avic type ts, great eaters, faster growth and they have that WOW! look.

    N. chromatus/coloratovillsus...much like your genic, but a little different.

    G. pulchripes...just an all around great spider...calm demeanor, fantastic eaters and good looks...and they rarely hide.

    B. albiceps....stunning, less common...slow growing as a sling, but worth it.

    B. albopilosum...good eaters, a little faster growth and calm demeanor....also rarely hides.

    B. cabocla....fast, but generally pretty calm...good growth rate and feeding response.

    GBB....heavy webber, crazy good eater, medium growth rate...now they can be pretty skittish, but theyre not difficult to work around at all....and hiding is rare.

    Another good one if you want to work your way up is N. incei...theyre a dwarf, topping at about 3", they grow fast, web a lot, eat very well, and have no urticating hairs...theyre very fast, but not defensive and easy to keep, just keep an area of damp sub.

    P. cambridgei is a favorite, but they get big and grow very fast...while they are fast themselves, they tend to not be very defensive (unlike irminia) and actually not too difficult to deal with, with a little experience....a great choice if you want to eventually get into OW arboreals.
     
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  10. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Arachnoprince Active Member

    Either of those would be a wonderful choice, especially if you are looking for something a little different from what you already have. (Avicularia versicolor is now Caribena versicolor.)

    Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens is extremely hardy, even as a sling. It also goes through several cool color changes, and it makes interesting web tunnels. Not exactly your nondescript brown sling:
    [​IMG]

    If you want to stay in the beginner-friendly species, you might also like Grammostola pulchra (if you can find one). They grow into a beautiful velvety black and tend to be very easygoing.
    [​IMG]

    Avicularia avicularia would also be a good first arboreal. They aren't as colorful or fluffy as Caribena versicolor, but they have adorable pink feet.
    [​IMG]


    Other than being hardier, I would consider Psalmopoeus to be more advanced than Avicularia (or Caribena versicolor) due to their speed, more potent venom, and (depending on species) defensiveness. In addition to being cool spiders in their own right, they are frequently recommended to those who are looking for a bridge between New World and Old World species.

    If you had your heart set on Psalmopoeus, I would recommend Psalmopoeus cambridgei, as it tends to be the least defensive (and is the most likely to be out on display as it grows). Otherwise, it makes a great second arboreal.
     
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  11. Troopermk2

    Troopermk2 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Oh dear y'all had to post those amazing photos didn't you lol :)....well, i certainly think that GBB and Caribena versicolor should be among my next more "immediate" additions, then once i'm comfortable with their enclosures, feeding and molting etcetcetc, take the plunge into the Psalmopoeus world possibly.

    I'm not quite sure i'm ready for a fast species with potent venom and i feel that im really still a newbie, so having 8 T's with a few nice varied colorations and variations on webbings is a good place to put a halt to the additions for the time being.

    As always you guys are amazingly helpful and awesome...but damn you and your temptations!
     
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  12. Ztesch

    Ztesch Arachnopeon Active Member

    What do you think of P. Sazamai? They are fast growing, speedy and have a lot of spunk. Not to mention once that blue starts coming through, they look amazing. I'm getting 1 saturday.
     
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  13. AshS

    AshS Arachnopeon

    Its been mentioned before, but I will suggest it again. C. Versicolor is a great way to go, get some experience on the aboreal side. Get a sling and watch it watch the colours change as it grows.
    20170907_184915.jpg
     
  14. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    They have a ridiculous feeding response IME. Like come out of cage towards you sometimes when you're opening the lid. Never seen a threat posture form mine yet. They can be quite fast, but with ample planning, there's really nothing to worry about. IMG_20170926_223819910_HDR.jpg
    Didn't care I sprayed her when she came out, didn't care I blew on her. Just made her more excited. Actually just let her be to crawl back in on her own.
     
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  15. darkness975

    darkness975 a Dream Within a Dream Arachnosupporter

    GBB
     
  16. MetalMan2004

    MetalMan2004 Arachnoknight Active Member

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    I’ll tell you what I did. After my male B hamorii matured I decided to get something a bit more exciting. Went with the gbb and it was clearly the right decision. She is awesome! Within a week or two I ordered a versicolor sling and I haven’t looked back. The gbb got me experience with something a bit faster (but not lightning fast) and the versi got me into arboreals. After I gave that some time I took the pokie plunge and I felt as prepared as I could be for it. I’m not saying go get a pokie next month, I’m just saying the gbb and versicolor were the perfect stepping stones for me!
     
  17. Shrike

    Shrike Arachnoprince Old Timer

    They're lightning quick, that's for sure. A P. irminia was the first tarantula that really bolted on me. I broke out in a sweat when I realized how fast it was. Lesson learned, the next time I was more prepared. In my experience Psalmopoeus aren't aggressive at all. Defensive is a more appropriate term to use, but I don't even find them to be that. I've never even seen one throw a threat posture. I find them to be very skittish, fleeing to their hides at the drop of a hat. There are some old world genera that are probably significantly more cantankerous.
     
  18. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Grammostola iheringi. One of the biggest Grammostola and absolutely stunning. They're also pretty fast, and they grow quickly.

    Ybyrapora diversipes. Just look at'em. They don't stay this color as adults, but they're still beautiful.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Phormictopus cancerides. They are large, feisty NW terrestrials who are navy blue as spiderlings. Care is much like A. geniculata, but they are feistier.
    [​IMG]

    And yeah. Definitely a Pamphobeteus. They're absolute BEASTS, even as slings.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Above is a Pamphobeteus sp. "Costa spiderling, eating, pre-molt, and then post-molt. The size they gained was impressive as heck.
     
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  19. PanzoN88

    PanzoN88 Arachnoknight

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    Any species withe the following genus:

    Nhandu

    For novice-intermediate, I would say go for a C. versicolor or any species in the Avicularia genus before going for a Phormictopus species. However, the GBB is probably the best choice at that experience level, that is the same thing I did.
     
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  20. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnobaron Active Member

    I was about to sentence this thread to Exterminatus for heresy in its most extreme form but we have a believer.

    It is better to die for the iheringi than to live for yourself.
     
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