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mold problem

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by toenailsoup, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

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    Are you planning on providing proof of that statement?

    @boina ... any input on this?
     
  2. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnosquire Active Member

    There’s plenty of material out there for you to read yourself. Also videos of experiences on the matter. Go to a library, use the search function on safari or whatever web browser you use, even here on the board as this isn’t a “new” thing.
     
  3. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    You must not be familiar with how burden of proof works.
     
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  4. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnosquire Active Member

    Look it up there’s your proof
     
  5. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron Active Member

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    It would probably be a lot easier for you to dig up your sources, considering you are already familiar with them. Sending someone who disagrees with you to find proof of your claim is a bit silly.
     
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  6. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    I've seen plenty of anecdotal stories about mold in the book lungs, but never any actual evidence. Just did a search myself, couldn't find anything but anecdotes and guesses. If you have some primary literature, that'd be wonderful - it means I'd learn something new today :)
     
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  7. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    Mold growing in book lungs is an old myth that won't die down. NO, mold cannot grow in book lung, at least not as long as the spider is healthy. Spiders have an immune system that's very efficient against mold, because mold is a very common factor in their natural environment. They simply wouldn't be able to survive without a very good protection against mold.

    @8LeggedLair is confusing anecdotes with proof - and using anecdotes to argue against established science. The next point in science: You need to establish a real causal relationship. If a dead spider is found with mold in it's book lungs that doesn't mean it died from the mold. It only means a dying spider got mold in its book lungs because its defenses were compromised.

    Oh, and @8LeggedLair - before you tell me I need to do more research: I'm a microbiologist scientist who's been working in immunology for several years. This is a topic I've researched extensively. It's you who needs to do some real reasearch, as in learning to distinguish between science and 'what people say'.
     
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  8. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnosquire Active Member

    I’m not saying this TRUTH or it’s a science I do not want nor have i ever had mold in any of my enclosures. You can checkout the common ailments of Captive Care of Invertebrates, which i just found. There’s several sites. I didn’t glance at it however.

    I do have a book on mold which tells the differences and the different types of mold... It was for biology class a very long time ago, however the preventive care on it still stands today... to prevent mold outbreak is of course ventilation in an area that is moist or wet.....

    If you have mold in a Tarantula enclosure then I would remove the T and clean the entire enclosure and not use the wood if there was again even if cleaned. Cork bark is cheap.
    Some people though confuse fungi and mold. Most Fungi isn’t harmful to Tarantulas in a captive environment that I am aware of, however Cordyceps is a very Parasitic Fungus and is certain death of the invertebrate that it comes into contact with. However IF I notice Mushrooms or Fuzzy white, green, grey, yellow mold growing I am removing it that’s all there is to it.
     
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  9. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnosquire Active Member

    I like for the most part how most everyone seems they’re some sort of professional scientist on this board... when we’re all here for the same reasons GIVING OUR EXPERIENCES which I’ve stated above about HOW I DO things...

    Yes a Tarantula absolutely CAN get mold in its book lungs if exposed long enough to said outbreak... don’t believe me, do it yourself... let mold grow in your T’s Enclosure and do nothing about it, once that mold becomes frivolous and no longer moistened, but dusty to the touch meaning it goes airborne, your T will be walking through it, dragging its abdomen in it eating its prey on it or around it. Then it will eventually die... but I guess the professionals here will say it’s DKS...
    Go to the library and check it out it’s a good read...
     
  10. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnosquire Active Member

    I majored in microbiology as well
     
  11. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    I have mold in several enclosures and I've had it for years. The tarantulas don't die, they are perfectly fine. Cleaning out an enclosure with mold is useless and overkill. If you are going on a cleaning spree at every sight of mold, fine, but I'm not going to sit by and let you teach this to newbies without challenging it. Tarantulas can live in moldy enclosures for years and be perfectly fine. They have specialized cells, called hemocytes, and antimicrobial peptides for defense against bacteria and fungus. Again: There is no scientifically sound proof that mold is harmful.

    Look, if you are a microbiologist, you really should get some things straight: mold and fungus is biologically the same, mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of some fungus. Cordyceps is a very rare parasite that you won't get in your enclosures because those are spores that are not just around in the air.
     
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  12. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnosquire Active Member

    I am not sure if you read what I say or not...
    I have never had mold in any of my enclosures...
    why is it that on other posts YOU yourself also say mold is bad?
    Like I said as well previously when talking about Fungi isn’t harmless that i know of to invertebrates, then also said that there is the parasitic fungus known as Cordyceps..
    you can do a search a keeper had his Tarantula infected with Cordyceps, so yes it absolutely can, since you were/are/studied microbiology then you yourself can not rule out the possibility of a Tarantula dying from frivolous mold that is no longer moistened that’s not how microbiologists or scientists operate, there is always an assumption and possibility dealing with Micro-organisms...let those dusty spores get in your T’s book lungs..
    but anywho I digress. Have a wonderful day
     
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  13. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    I like gow your claim is to "do it yourself" for everything, as if it is something no one would ever attempt. I have plenty of enclosures with various molds/fungi in them... and the Ts are perfectly fine.

    So you've never had mold in any of your enclosures, but you are making all these claims about how harmful it is and how we should "try it ourselves"... yet you have no firsthand experience with it yourself?? You are basing everything you say off other peoples' claims, and ignoring those of us with actual mold experience. Interesting method...
     
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  14. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Well, you are having a discussion with a working scientist, and you yourself claim to be one as well. So I was honestly hoping for more information regarding my request for sources. Instead, the reply boiled down to more anecdotes.

    That being said, here is my anecdote. The majority of my humid enclosures have mold. Several have sprouting mushrooms right now. You bring up mold that is allowed to dry out - several of my Brachypelma species are in this exact situation, and have been for years. So in my case at least, I see no evidence of mold causing issues.
     
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