1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Mold issues! Help please!

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by FuzzyFreaks420, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. FuzzyFreaks420

    FuzzyFreaks420 Arachnosquire

    Advertisement
    I am seeming to get bad mold in his enclosure what do I do?

    He is a
    Poecilotheria regalis
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
  2. Toddydog

    Toddydog Arachnosquire

    It seems like it's a pretty bad mold outbreak. I would clean out the enclosure. may I ask what kind of species you're keeping? If it's a species that needs more moisture I would suggest getting an enclosure that's easy to poke holes in so you can make hole on the substrate level so the moisture can ventilate.
    Edit: usually a little bit of mold is harmless but I wouldn't take chances with that.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  3. Yep, need a species so we now hoe wet/dry the dirt should be.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. FuzzyFreaks420

    FuzzyFreaks420 Arachnosquire

    Poecilotheria regalis
     
  5. Anoplogaster

    Anoplogaster Arachnobaron

    P. regalis can take a bit of dryness. If you let the sub dry, the mold should go away. Don’t overdo moisture. Just keep a full water dish.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  6. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoking Active Member

    Moss peat helps with mold as it's slightly acidic. Add in springtails and you're laughing if you need the substrate moist for live plants.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  7. FuzzyFreaks420

    FuzzyFreaks420 Arachnosquire

    How often would you damp the substrate? Once weekly if it gets dry?
     
  8. FuzzyFreaks420

    FuzzyFreaks420 Arachnosquire

    Add peat into the substrate mixture?
     
  9. Anoplogaster

    Anoplogaster Arachnobaron

    To be honest, I don’t. I have not seen any issues from having bone dry substrate with pokies.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoking Active Member

    No. The whole lot needs to be moss peat.
     
  11. MikeofBorg

    MikeofBorg Arachnosquire Active Member

    I added springtails I cultured into all my enclosures. I’ve never had a mold outbreak in any of them. I overflow my water dish weekly for my A seemanni and have been mold free for 18 months thnx to the springtails. I actually enjoy watching the springtails work. Look like tiny grains of rice with heads and legs. They are quite active foraging the enclosure for fungi, algae and bacteria. And I have seen them eat a pile of Tarantula poo before. They seem to eat anything they can get nutrients from. I also added red worms to the substrate since I have live plants. Tried to go with a natural biological system to maintain cleanliness in the enclosures. Only enclosure without red worms is my A chalcodes. She is on bone dry sub.

    For my substrate I use a mix of peat moss, vermiculite, pool filtration sand, coconut husk and organic potting soil (no additives). Seems to be a great mix for reducing mold, allowing water to percolate into the substrate and makes it very stable for burrowing species. It’s a great mix moist or bone dry.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
    • Helpful Helpful x 2
  12. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnolord Active Member

    662
    622
    108
    Texas
    I keep my pokie bone dry with a full water dish and have never had any problems. If you just let it dry out for a while until the mold disappears you'll be perfectly fine.
     
  13. FuzzyFreaks420

    FuzzyFreaks420 Arachnosquire

    Where do I get springtails?
     
  14. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

    7,008
    6,507
    1,278
    I never do.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  15. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

    7,008
    6,507
    1,278
    vendors online, like here, dendroboards, etc. Have you tried using Google yet?
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  16. FuzzyFreaks420

    FuzzyFreaks420 Arachnosquire

    No not yet I figured I would ask first
     
  17. MikeofBorg

    MikeofBorg Arachnosquire Active Member

    I got mine by taking some moss from outside. Putting it in a plastic container then crushing hardwood bulk charcoal and laying it on top. Then I filled it with water to just below to top of the charcoal. Drop in a few grains of uncooked rice and in a week or two you'll see them all over the charcoal. I ended up with two kinds, the long white ones and the round pinkish colored ones that are fat little dudes. The round ones seem to prefer fruit that I feed my L dubia roaches. They do a great job cleaning up roach leftovers in my colony.

    Added a pic of my springtail culture container. Every little white dot is a springtail.

    If someone would like some I can send a starter vial of them to you. Just ask.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  18. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    I pretty much disagree with the consensus...I would do absolutely positively...NOTHING.

    1. Pokies can be kept pretty dry for extended periods of time, just give it dry time.

    2. Mold isn't a real issue, mold like that can just be left to run its course so to speak...in time it will use up its nutrients and die off. Its a short term issue with really zero negative consequences.

    Mold has to be pretty darn bad, and in the area the t is living for me to get at all concerned.

    I have never used or felt the need to use springtails or isopods.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  19. MikeofBorg

    MikeofBorg Arachnosquire Active Member

    I don't have any Pokies. All mine are New World species. I try to keep their enclosures as close to their natural environment as I can. Saguaro desert for my A. chalcodes, tropical western Costa Rica for my A. seemanni and eastern Guyana coastal tropical forest for my A. avicularia. My B. hamorii is a sling so it doesn't have a natural enclosure yet. I use live plants so I set my enclosures up as a sort of biosphere with ventilation. I have detritus eaters to recycle T waste into nutrient for the plants. So far two of my Ts have lived in natural enclosures going on two years with no substrate changes. An occasional plant pruning and a bit of water, not much as I used drought tolerant plants. Both Ts have molted multiple times with A. vulgares pillbugs, red worms and springtails with no issues. I don't have to pick out T poo, because it gets recycled into the substrate by the detritus guys.

    Really it is up to the keeper how they want their enclosures to look. Just be sure to match the parameters to the T's natural environment. I do not mess with temps though, most of my Ts are used to mid 70s F anyway in their natural environment or will seek that range of temp. Even for the A. chalcodes this is a good temp. At 73F my A. chalcodes never uses her burrow except to molt. I like the natural look, plus I have my Ts displayed in my family and living rooms. So I like their enclosures to look as good as the Ts do. Sometimes the T hides, but a good looking natural enclosure still grabs visitors attention. Biggest thing is don't harm your T and do slings the usual way until they large enough for the natural enclosure. As long as your enclosure conforms to the T's natural environment humidity wise and have adequate ventilation you should not harm your Tarantula in anyway, and actually may benefit it. Most likely it will be of no benefit or harm to your T which is fine.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
  20. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    This is an impossible task. We should be striving for ideal conditions...ideal conditions are seldom consistent in the wild and are often fleeting....part of the reason our survival rates in captivity are polar opposites of those in the wild.

    I have literally never done a substrate change in 18 years....sub doesn't go bad and shouldn't need to be changed.

    Of course not...I never said, or even insinuated that they would cause any issues...I merely said I had never used them nor seen a need to use them. Picking out a bolus isn't all that difficult.

    Of course its up to the individual, I merely said what I would, or would not do. But you are fooling yourself if you think you need to match the natural environment.
    Pretty much ALL ts are fine and comfortable at those temps. Ts do not have small temp windows and nearly all species can handle wide variances in temperature. In their natural environments temperatures and humidity levels vary greatly and fluctuate often.....often these variances are huge...much more than anyone keeping them in captivity would generally allow.
    Or any other t.
    Who doesn't?
    Humidity is not relevant to keeping tarantulas. Any t can be kept at any humidity, its just a matter of some requiring damp substrate.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
    • Like Like x 1
    • Helpful Helpful x 1