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Minnesota Pedes

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by Tleilaxu, Jun 10, 2006.

  1. Tleilaxu

    Tleilaxu Arachnoprince

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    What type of pedes are found up here they look like mini S. robusta. The biggest I saw was maybe three inches.
     
  2. Cheshire

    Cheshire Arachnoking Old Timer

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    They sound like scolocryptops species. Count the legs and that will give us a clue as to what they are.

    In the meantime, search for the Iowa centi list and PM cacoseraph.
     
  3. Tleilaxu

    Tleilaxu Arachnoprince

    I have pics of a sub adult one!

    [​IMG]

    This should help with ID.
     
  4. Cheshire

    Cheshire Arachnoking Old Timer

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    I think lithiobiomorpha
     
  5. CopperInMyVeins

    CopperInMyVeins Arachnolord

    Yeah, it is, not enough legs/body segments to be scolopendromorpha.
     
  6. It's also an adult. Not a sub adult.
     
  7. Nice looking little fella!
     
  8. Tleilaxu

    Tleilaxu Arachnoprince


    No because the adults I have seen are larger. And a deeper red.
     
  9. Not necessarily. There are literally thousands of lithobius species. And it would take an expert with a microscope to be able to tell the difference between em. The larger deeper red ones you are finding could be a different species.
     
  10. CopperInMyVeins

    CopperInMyVeins Arachnolord

    Well, lithobiomorpha aren't born with all their body segments, I think they're generally born with 7, and then add them with each molt, until they have 15 segments, the maximum number that order can have. The one in the picture has 15, so the larger ones you see are probably a different species. Scolopendromorpha have 21 or 23 segments, and have them all right from birth.
     
  11. Could be Scolocryptops or Theotops. I don't know if they're native but they're longer and red.
     
  12. Tleilaxu

    Tleilaxu Arachnoprince

    Oh I see well they all look the same to me up here :eek: anyways... atleast we were able to pin them into a genus.
     
  13. Cheshire

    Cheshire Arachnoking Old Timer

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    The longer, redder ones could *could* be soil cents (again, search the Iowa centi list for genus name) but theatops and scolocryptops are also found this far north so those genra are definitely not out of the question.
     
  14. The one in the picture is a Lithobius spp (aka stone centipede). Centipedes of the genus Lithobiomorpha are extremely long and thin and can have upwards of 150 pairs of legs (and are also blind).
     
  15. cacoseraph

    cacoseraph ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Lithiobiomorpha max at 15 leg bearing body segments = stone cents
    geophilomorpha max at >150 leg bearing body segments = soil/snail cents

    scolopocryptops always have 23 leg bearing segs and are eyeless
    theatops should have 21 and are eyeless also. i think theatops all have fat terminal legs, but i'm not sure about that