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Millipede Vivarium Planting Advice

Discussion in 'Vivariums and Terrariums' started by Hermes, Jul 3, 2017.

  1. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    How do you fertilize plants in a vivarium containing decomposers that would normally consume the soil? Are there non toxic fertilizers that can be used? Also, what are some vivarium plants that can be used with inverts that will occasionally munch on leaves? Any and all advice is welcome, thank you!
     
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  2. Felix S

    Felix S Arachnopeon

    I don't know if maybe you are new to millipedes, but they will munch on any plant. Hope you can find some cool looking decorations. Also, what kind of millipede are you thinking about getting?
     
  3. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    I've been keeping millipedes for years, but I've never kept mine with live plants before. I'll be stocking the vivarium with an A. gigs, a trio of Vietnamese Rainbows, a colony of Glomeris marginata, hopefully some bumblebee millipedes, and sometime down the line a Zephronia sp.
     
  4. Felix S

    Felix S Arachnopeon

    What tank size are you planning on using?
     
  5. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    You're real problem isn't so much the millipedes eating the plants, it's whether the plants are suitable for low light/high humidity and could survive their tank. Thankfully, before I got into millipedes just recently (like a month ago), I spent years making plant terrariums as a hobby. Here are a few species that are pretty hardy in those conditions (just pick some based on your viv size): miniature ivy, Bolivian Wandering Jew (these are fantastically hardy), Wandering Jew (regular size), Pilea (many different species), small ferns, pepperomia (some species are a bit delicate physically, but they do well in those conditions), Snake plants, Dracaena (choose smaller specimen), Earth Stars, Syngonium, Philodendron/Pothos vines, and also consider adding some moss (the millis DO like eating this occasionally, though, so be forewarned). Hope this helps.
     
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  6. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Thank you so so much! You're the only person so far who's given me such detailed advice! Would Creeping Fig work, or does that need more light? And by small ferns, do you mean like Selaginella, or something else? I've never really looked into ferns. I'll be using a ten gallon tank, if that's any help.
     
  7. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    I think Creeping Fig takes a bit more light, but you're welcome to give it a try! Selaginella would also work, but for smaller ferns, this page has some good options:
    http://www.neherpetoculture.com/ferns

    For a ten gallon, nearly any of those options will work, just not too many at once, of course! :) Also, you're welcome!
     
  8. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Thank you so much! One last question, lots of the plants for sale on the site are listed as clippings. Do I have to let them sit in water to let them root a bit first, or would it be okay for me to just stick them in the substrate?
     
  9. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    The Bolivian Wandering Jew will root by just sticking it in the substrate (it grows crazy successfully)...but for other plants, I'd root them in water first. If you have any more questions, just ask!
     
  10. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Great, thanks. This is the list of plants I was thinking of using:
    Korean Rock Fern
    Pilea cadierei
    Bolivian Wandering Jew
    Sansevieria trifasciata
    Frosty Fern Selaginella
    Does this sound like a good idea? I'm aiming to keep the humidity around 80%, with the temp around 70 in the winter and up to 80 in the summer. I'm using two CFLs for a light source.
     
  11. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Sorry, forgot to quote you so you'd get a notification
     
  12. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    That plant list sounds fine to me, though I do hope that 80 degrees isn't too hot for the millipedes (someone else will need to chime in on that one because I'm not sure). As for the CFLs, obviously get some daylight spectrum ones (Daylight LEDs would work, too - I've noticed CFLs being sold less and less in my local stores, not sure about yours).
     
  13. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    I made sure that they were in the right range for Kelvin, I'll purchase some LEDs when I have the money. And all of the species I'm keeping can tolerate that high of a temp for short periods of time, it's rare that it's that warm in my room for more than a few hours. I've been keeping pedes for years, but I've never set up a vivarium. Thank you for the info, I'll post a picture when it's all set up!
     
  14. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    Oh, okay, I didn't realize you'd kept millipedes before. I'm actually relatively new to keeping them, but I've made loads of terrariums over the years. If you're interested, here's some crummy quality pics I took of my vivs - the big round vase one is the millipede viv, and the "house" style one has terrestrial snails in it (alas, snails are my first love before I got millipedes). I'm thinking of making a more ventilated lid for the millipedes...let me know if you think they need it. That glass plate has gaps along the edges, so it's not airtight or anything.

    Milliipede Viv.jpg Snail Viv.jpg
     
  15. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Yeah, they would appreciate the extra ventilation, especially if they are large species. Ideally, the humidity should be between 60% and 80%, depending on the species. Also (it might be in there but I can't see it in the picture), make sure that there is lots of dead oak leaves and rotting hardwood, as that composes the majority of their diet.
     
  16. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Forgot to quote you again
     
  17. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    None of them are really bigger than Florida Ivories...but I'm definitely planning to make a better ventilated lid. Also, yes, there's lots of oak/leaves in there, and a nutritious edible substrate (or as nutritious as rotten wood can be).
     
  18. Hermes

    Hermes Arachnosquire

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    Do you know the species?
     
  19. feelahthetigress

    feelahthetigress Arachnopeon

    Ah, yes, I've got Florida Ivories, a Smoky Oaks, one baby spirostreptus, a bumblebee, and a Narceus americanus. Oh, and I forgot (edit) some slate millipedes.