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Mexican red knee

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Katielou89, Aug 15, 2017.

  1. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    Hi I'm new to this site but just gotta a couple of questions for anyone that has more experience than me :) I bought a Mexican red knee about 2 months ago for my son, she never ate nothing then molted then after a week or so I put a cricket in there and she had it in her mouth but didn't completely eat it, that was 13 days ago and she's refused anything since is this normal? Could she molt again it hasn't even been a whole month since the first molt, she's very quiet rarely see her she hides in her coconut all the time.
     

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  2. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    If she molted a month ago then no it's pretty unlikely she is molting again a month later. Brachypelma hamorii is a slow growing species. Brachypelma can also go on periods of fasting, so it is likely she is just refusing food. As long as she has 24/7 access to water then she should be more than fine.

    However I don't believe you have enough substrate in that enclosure. It's a bit hard to tell from the perspective but there should only be about 1.5x their leg span worth of space between the substrate and the top of the enclosure. Tarantulas are very susceptible to falls and drops. So if she has a leg span of 3" then there should be 4.5" between the substrate and the top.

    It's also hard to tell from the picture whether your substrate is just dark in color, or wet. If it is wet then it shouldn't be. B. hamorii like dry substrate, not wet substrate.
     
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  3. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    We use something called 'spider life' for the bottom off it as the pet shop said to try it, I'm very new to all of it, I do clean her water pretty much everyday, and I offer her food every night but every morning it's still there.
     

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  4. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    All I've done is Google things lol but it says that small red knees can molt quite often?
     
  5. EmilzHernandez

    EmilzHernandez Arachnosquire Active Member

    I would suggest adding MUCH more substrate. That is not nearly enough, if she falls she could definitely rupture her abdomen. It's definitely best to assure that a fall is prevented.
     
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  6. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    OK will definitely add quite a bit more now, although I never see her out she stays in the coconut all the time :/ and she hasn't webbed is that normal?
     
  7. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Alright well first of all, pet shops usually don't know jack diddly about proper tarantula husbandry. So take whatever they said with a grain of salt!

    Small B. hamorii constitute slings.

    [​IMG]

    THAT is a picture of a sling. Haha, slings grow faster than juveniles and adults do.

    Second of all you DEFINITELY need more substrate in there. I'm also a bit wary of a substrate mixed by pet shops specifically for tarantulas. I use coconut fiber mixed with sphagnum for my slings and just plain old coco fiber for juveniles and adults with a bit of sphagnum just for aesthetics and decoration.
     
  8. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Brachypelma aren't much for webbing. They'll web but it isn't always the most noticeable.
     
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  9. EmilzHernandez

    EmilzHernandez Arachnosquire Active Member

    I have a 2 inch B.hamorii, and this is her enclosure. I do plan on changing the hide, but the substrate is high enough she is safe from falls overall
     

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  10. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    OK so maybe change the substrate altogether then? How big do you think she is, obviously when we got her she was in this little container thing :( just want the best stuff for her to keep her happy :)
     
  11. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    Wow I'll definitely put a load more in then
     
  12. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    I've put the rest of the bag in, do I still need more if so will have to get another bag tomorrow?
     

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  13. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Yes, also you don't have to keep that hygrometer in there. Chasing humidity numbers is frustrating and pointless. Did the bag have an ingredients list of what they put into it?
     
  14. darkness975

    darkness975 A Dream Within a Dream Arachnosupporter

    Should look like this in there. Bone dry substrate, I use Eco earth personally.

    There should only be 1.5 times the DLS of the spider distance from the substrate to the top.
     
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  15. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    Does it make a big difference on the substrate that we use? Or is it just how much we put in it?
     
  16. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    The problem is if they used something with fertilizer or added chemicals that could harm your tarantula. Pet stores that don't know proper tarantula husbandry might not know that something they blended into their 'tarantula specific substrate' could actually be dangerous.

    You wouldn't want to toss your tarantula into an enclosure full of miracle grow for example.
     
  17. Katielou89

    Katielou89 Arachnopeon

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    This is what we got?
     

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  18. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Welp I'm not impressed with the directions. 1"-2" of substrate for non-burrowing species and 5"-6" for burrowing species is false. Substrate is subjective to the size of the enclosure. For example like yours was set up, it was about 1.5" of substrate and 6" of space for the tarantula to fall. That's no good. You need to put in as much substrate as needed for the enclosure you're working with. If I have a 3" high enclosure for a burrowing spiderling, I can't put in 5"-6" of substrate you see? Those directions are just too general.

    Also I'm not a fan of the "keep substrate slightly damp" because the moisture levels vary from tarantula species. A G. porteri is kept on bone dry substrate where as a T. stirmi is kept on very damp substrate. It's more bad information.

    Also the fact that they don't list what is put into it just doesn't seem right to me from an honest business stand point.

    THAT SAID--I've googled it a bit and seen tarantula keepers say it doesn't have anything harmful in it but they don't like it for the same reasons I don't like it. From what I'm reading it is a mixture of peat and vermiculite, so if that is true then it is safe and won't harm your tarantula. Here is an old thread where they talk about it.

    When it's all said and done, that substrate is just a gimmick. They put a label on it to sell it to you at a higher price than if you just bought cheap peat and vermiculite and mixed it yourself. Eco Earth is made of coconut fiber and it is used commonly by keepers on here.
     
  19. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Arachnoprince Active Member

    The type of substrate doesn't matter as much for this species as the depth and moisture level. (A substrate marketed for tarantulas is probably safe, just overpriced.) If you are buying your own, you want to avoid anything with pesticides, fungicides, or fertilizers, or other such additives.)

    Once they get past the sling stage, Brachypelma generally prefer drier substrate. (One sign that they might not like the substrate is if, more than a couple of weeks after being put in a new enclosure, they are constantly crawling on the walls and otherwise trying to avoid contact with the substrate.)
     
  20. whovian89

    whovian89 Arachnopeon Active Member

    I am also a newbie so I may be wrong but does that hide/coconut look a tad too tall for a terrestrial T? I like to keep my hides semi-buried in the substrate.

    EDIT: nvm, I didn't look at the second picture .. the one after you added substrate.