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Mesquite BBQ smoking wood chips

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Desert scorps, Sep 6, 2019.

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    Kind of a weird question but I was wondering what your guys’ opinion would be on if using these with Centruroides sculpturatus scorplings would be safe. I ran out of the bark i was using before and i noticed i had these mesquite bbq woodchips in my pantry for whenever we smoked ribs or whatever, but i had the idea of using them for my scorplings since they’re the perfect size
     
  2. undeaddeaths

    undeaddeaths Arachnosquire Active Member

    If it's not treated at all (since it's meant for smoking there may be additives), I wouldn't see why not?
    I've never found it to be very aromatic or resinous when bone dry like say cedar or pine.
    Perhaps some other opinions would be nice.
     
  3. to my knowledge there aren’t any additives. but yeah forsure. i’ll wait and see if anyone else wants to chime in. thanks for the reply!
     
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  4. beetleman

    beetleman Arachnoking Old Timer

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    i'll tell ya one thing........you will have a nice smelling enclosure if it is safe to use for the little buggers :) mmmmm......mesquite bbq
     
  5. Rhino1

    Rhino1 Arachnoknight Active Member

    Hey mate, just like our food, some woodchips are laden with chemicals to protect a companies viability at the cost of the health of their consumers and families. Some are soaked in flame retardant, almost all are treated with insecticide, here's an extract from guidelines outlined for such companies.

    Extract reads as follows:
    Insect control. All insects on cooking wood must be
    killed. If not, they will come out of the package in
    stores, homes, and restaurants and can ruin a business.
    Most companies are using insecticide chemicals such as
    aluminum and magnesium phosphide fumigants or
    methyl bromide. At the time of printing of this publica-
    tion, methyl bromide has been scheduled by EPA to be
    phased out by year 2000. The Texas Department of
    Agriculture has approved these two chemicals (and only
    these two) for treatment of mesquite cooking wood.

    "Hmmm, nice smoked ribs but could have used more methyl bromide?"
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
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  6. darkness975

    darkness975 dream reaper Arachnosupporter

    I would not use that product. Just get something that is guaranteed to be invertebrate safe.

    Why risk it?

    Centruroides sculpturatus are arboreal. They don't really care what the substrate is all that much. Throw a thin layer of play sand or whatever in there to mimic their natural environment and provide the appropriate climbing bark/surfaces/etc and leave it at that.
     
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