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Meet Tetris

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Andee, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

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    This is Tetris a new member of the house hold who is very grumpy from his ride here XD

    Tetris.jpg
     
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  2. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Arachnoknight Active Member

    Nice! Which species?
     
  3. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    Hadogenes troglodytes i think he's a sub adult <3
     
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  4. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoknight

    Love this species, they are awesome and hardy. But can be painful to breed sometimes.
     
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  5. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    I plan to work on breeding these guys, if you have any tips I would love if you would share your wisdom. I plan to switch over to a more... Sandy substrate before breeding occurs. Add a flat rock, and try recreate natural temp drops and humidity and rain fall as what happens where they are found.
     
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  6. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    I plan to work on breeding these guys, if you have any tips I would love if you would share your wisdom. I plan to switch over to a more... Sandy substrate before breeding occurs. Add a flat rock, and try recreate natural temp drops and humidity and rain fall as what happens where they are found.
     
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  7. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    Darn double post
     
  8. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoknight

    I have never owned these scorpions before, but I had helped a friend of mine breed them. They are more cannibalistic than most other scorpions on breeding. But after a few attempt pairings, we finally got a successful breeding of 2 females. This is where "COMPLICATION" comes into place. We literally waited for over 12 months, leading in to almost 16 months for actual scorplings. The temps was pretty warm and decent feeding according to how my friend kept them. The time took so long, we thought that it was just a fat scorpion at that point. But when we did got scorplings, he just sold most of them. But I didn't take any, because I wasn't into scorpions like that yet.
     
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  9. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    Oh I don't mind a wait and honestly, I have g. Pulchra as my only t to work with now, I have cannibalism easy to deal with in true spiders and mantids so I assume it's the same way to deal with in scorps?
     
  10. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoknight

    Kinda is easy to deal with them. Just make sure the female lets go of the male if she is to aggressive, the chances of females attacking with stinger is almost zero when breeding. Because females have smaller tails than males when fully mature for the H. troglodytes. Its really easy to know if shes going to eat him or not. If she is responsive and not aggressive then you should be fine. But the females were pretty harsh on the males when we bred them. So basically if the female doesn't let go of her pincers/claws after the male inserts and she starts to act aggressive, then just use tongs or something to divide the two until the female lets go after insertion.
     
  11. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    Interesting, such interesting breeding habits inverts have. Thanks for your info it is very valued <3 I have to look for longer tongs to work with him currently. Because he's been very defensive and my tongs are just a hair shorter than I'd like XD
     
  12. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Arachnoknight Active Member

    It looks similiar to some of the Australian species, I see that our "Rainforest Scorpions" , Liocheles/ Hormurus are in the same family, they don't get anywhere near as big though.
     
  13. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    Flat rocks as they are called are similar to rainforests with their heavy claws if it's the same type of rainforest species I am thinking about, heterometrus sp.? But they are thinner/flatter and depending on the species of heterometrus are longer than most.
     
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  14. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnoknight Active Member

    VERY nice looking specimen, congrats. I have one, and it's one of the best. I did notice however that the pictured enclosure is definitely not proper for a flatrock. Sand and spaced flat rocks are the rule for these guys. Tetris will continue to be grumpy if he has no rocks between which to hide, hence the name of the species.
     
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  15. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    Thanks so much for the info sweetie. I will adjust immediately <3
     
  16. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    I do not have sand currently, should I add flat rocks for now and then when I pick up the sand later adjust?

    Edit: Plan on picking up the sand tomorrow and do you suggest pure sand or a mix?
     
  17. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnoknight Active Member

    Yes, Ma'am. Mine very rarely ventures off of the rocks, so keeping the current substrate for the time being ought not be an issue. When setting up the rocks, make sure you take into consideration his size and stack them accordingly. I have mine set to where it can move from place to place, which it does often. You can also get a read on when they're hungry by their positioning in the spaces. When they are chilling you can hardly see them, if at all, as they tuck way back. However, when they're hungry you see those pincers outstretched from the crevices, so cool.
     
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  18. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    This is what I was able to set up for now, I thought I had some of my slate tile left but I don't apparently. But I broke his pot up and created this with hot glue covering all sharp edges and holding it together so no squishing. I plan to get more slate rock when I pick up sand. It's not expensive and 3-4 pieces would be perfect for him <3 Can you tell if he's an adult?

    Flat rocks for Tetris.jpg
     
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  19. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnoknight Active Member

    Honestly, I don't know how he will take to the curves as they really seem to like tight crevices, but give it a try. He will be none the worse for the wear if you need a couple days to snag some slate.

    Regarding his age, they are quite large scorps (one of the largest). So, I would say from what I can tell from your picture he is a good sized sub-adult. Maybe someone else can chime in on that question.
     
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  20. Andee

    Andee Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    I figured I would need some slate in the long run but once I can run out to get sand I can get some and I think he will like the tighter crevices of this that just the open clay pot I originally had. Lol improvisation for my boy. I agree he looks like a sub adult but good sized one. I think he will be adult soon but needs a few more months before molting <3 idk I am newish to Scorpions but want to make them my focus. It's just like ts though, I can't take cate sheets at face value it seems and have to rely instead on where they are known to come from. Thank you for your help! I just want my babies happy and healthy.