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Keeping Galodes Alive?

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Terrena Laxamentum, Jun 11, 2018.

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    Is it possible to keep these animals alive long term in captivity?
     
  2. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    I have no experience with Galeodes species, but I have kept (or tried to keep) some of the native California and Arizona solifugids. They do well short-term, eating and appearing to be fine. I've even had a couple molt successfully while in my care. I had one gravid wc female lay eggs, too - but she promptly ate them. Ultimately, though, they always seem to die after a few months. I think the longest I've kept one alive in captivity had been 6 or 7 months. (Those were the ones that molted, so they spent a significant chunk of that time immobile in premolt.) I still catch a few of the locals every summer to show my students - but I only keep them for a week or two, then release them back where I found them.
     
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  3. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

  4. sschind

    sschind Arachnobaron Old Timer

    That depends on your views. If its a monetary thing many people buy mantids that do not have a long lifespan (though longer than these apparently) and they feel its worth it. I look at something like an orchid mantis and what they sell for as nymphs and if I knew I could get a female that would live its natural lifespan I may consider it worth it but it pushing it.

    If you are of the opinion that captivity shortens the lifespan of these creature which would normally live longer in the wild you will need to decide for yourself if that is acceptable to you.

    Someone may unlock the secret of keeping these long term but it seems what constitutes long term is still somewhat of a mystery. Chandra obviously caught a few immature specimens (they molted) and they lived longer than others. Perhaps these have a naturally short lifespan as adults and most of them we catch are adults already so if you could get some babies you may be able to keep them longer. They may be not unlike mantids in that respect. It may be that it is just very difficult to provide these with what they need at any stage of their life and are doomed to shortened lifespans in captivity. They remind me of horned lizards in a way. Disreputable sellers will claim they eat crickets just fine which is true. They will eat crickets just fine. They just won't survive very long on them. The difference is that we apparently know what horned lizards need (formic acid producing ants) and we may not with these.

    If you are the type of person who is dedicated to trying to find the secret of long term success with this species in captivity then it may very well be worth it. If you just think they are cool and would like to try keeping one then maybe its not. I know myself I fall into the latter category. I think they are awesome animals but I know it would be extremely unlikely that I could crack the code when others far more dedicated have not been able to do so and because of that I am destined to observe them from afar. I would not mind getting a few well preserved specimens after they have lived out their natural lives however .
     
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  5. That makes sense. Honestly, I fall under the same category as you, I'll wait until more information is uncovered. Thanks for your input!
     
  6. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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    An important thing to consider- many people throw away a live solifuge in premolt because they appear dead and dying.

    [​IMG]

    this is what a solifuge in premolt looks like. You can consider them to be an arthropod with a pupal stage between each instar. if your galeodes is less than 4 inches, it's still a youngin, most likely.
     
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  7. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    After reading this thread I'm seriously tempted to get one... There's actually plenty of information about keeping them alive, like in this thread. If it is true that they run themselves to death a highly structured enclosure with plenty of different hiding spots and proper substrate should be the key, and additionally much cooler temps than most 'care sheets' recommend. Honestly, I have no clue, but I'd love to experiment with that.

    Now, where do I get a Solifugid ;)?
     
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  8. Very interesting. This one here is most likely adult then? (It walked onto my hand when I opened the container)
     

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  9. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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    I've found some of Punzo's claims to be untrue after experimenting with various genera, at least when it comes to those in my region. All you really have to do is give them enough stable sub to burrow, and make sure the bottom few inches of the enclosure are taped so light wont penetrate, otherwise it thinks it has to dig deeper and will collapse the sub from excessive excavating. after your solifuge has made its burrow, you then keep the photoperiod long, and the dark period short.

    this can be easy for small species, but massive kinds like Eremocosta and Galeodes get so huge that they need up to 3 feet of substrate or else they'll collapse it.

    other tips:
    Make sure you use a stout enclosure without flexing sides, as this will cause substrate collapse. ALSO! add a pile of fine sand somewhere in there. solifugae groom with it!
     
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  10. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    Well, Galeodes is the only Solifigid you seem to be able to get in Europe. Some people who observed them in the wild said they don't really burrow but live among stones and in cracks. Actually I don't think I'll be able to find one for sale and that's probably not that bad since they seem to be taken from the wild to die in captivity by the dozens.