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Isopod Tales, Wishlists, Etc.

Discussion in 'Insects, Other Invertebrates & Arthropods' started by Jurdon, Sep 16, 2018.

  1. Jurdon

    Jurdon Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Over the last few years, I’ve descended further and further down the rabbit-hole that is the isopod hobby, after a long-time fascination with the Philoscia muscorum I’d often find running about under just about every log I flipped as a kid. Fast-forward to present day, and I’ve currently got six species! Not a lot, I know, but I’m deeply passionate about every one of the species I keep.

    Enough about that though, my questions for all of you are what are some of your milestones keeping these interesting little critters? What are your dream species? Any interesting encounters or experiences with iso’s in the wild or otherwise?
     
  2. Speg

    Speg Arachnosquire

    My personal milestones have been selling these things. I started selling Isopods on a few online venues and have recently been selling to one of the more well-known reptile store in my state... and re-orders are occurring! Very happy to have a fun little hobby like this pay for itself and more.

    My dream isopod is the rubber ducky.

    Did you tell us yours? ;)
     
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  3. Jurdon

    Jurdon Arachnosquire Active Member

    That’s awesome! I hope to start selling some, but that’s only after I breed some that are really worth selling (I’m looking at YOU, Porcellio ornatus who haven’t been reproducing since February). And I didn’t tell you my dream isopod! How terribly rude of me :(
    I suppose Armadillidium klugii and P. boliviari are among the dream species I could feasibly obtain, but there are some species with absolutely no hobby presence that would be insane to have. H. reaumuri, for instance, or, (slightly) more realistically, Calmanesia sp. Either would be breathtaking in a large display enclosure.
     
  4. davehuth

    davehuth Arachnosquire Active Member

    I honestly just love trying to select a trait and move populations in that direction by isolating it. Not for a reason other than the joy of it. It's so fun for me to collect little common animals living in my compost pile, and then, if I treat them with understanding and respect, I'm rewarded with this cool genetics game. All in a plastic box on a shelf! Such weird, cool little animals.
     
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  5. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Thank you for making this thread. I don't have much experience with isopods yet but I am enjoying hearing your guys' :).
     
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  6. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Have my first tale for you guys. Just found one of my WC Armadillidiidae had its first "litter" :D.
     
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  7. Jurdon

    Jurdon Arachnosquire Active Member

    Hey, congrats! I was up into the ungodly hours of the night last night and saw two of my Porcellio ornatus mating, and I haven’t had any new litters since the beginning of the year. Here’s to baby ‘pods! Also, if you need your Armadillidiidae ID’ed, feel free to send pics! (assuming it’s a classified sp. and not one of the crazy asian pods that are starting to have a bigger hobby presence, lol)
     
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  8. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Sounds great! I've got a few different kinds in there so maybe I'll try and send you pics of both species. I'll see if I can go try and get some shots ;).
     
  9. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    woodlouse2.jpg

    The one below is still a juvie. The adult wasn't visible at the moment as it had burrowed down a bit. When it's older, the spots on this one should get more yellow I believe.
    woodlouse1.jpg

    Thanks again :)!

    I looked up your Porcellio ornatus too and that looks like a really pretty species. How many different species are you keeping right now?
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018 at 11:16 PM
  10. Polenth

    Polenth Arachnopeon

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    I'm new to keeping woodlice this year (and to this forum). My first species was Porcellio laevis "Dairy Cow". After that, it got complicated. I have some oranges which I'm pretty sure are also P. laevis (but weren't labelled that way). I have mystery bonus woodlice that came with my millipedes, which are probably Trichorhina tomentosa (I will confirm under the microscope when I get time).

    I'm hoping to start a Philoscia muscorum colony with the ones that come in on the leaf litter. I only really decided that this week, after I found three when I was processing the litter.
     
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  11. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Welcome! It sounds like you've got a good start on your woodlice already. I googled your different species. I like the looks of the Trichorhina tomentosa.
     
  12. Jurdon

    Jurdon Arachnosquire Active Member

    The top pic is definitely Philoscia muscorum, one of my favorite species! They can be kinda hard to get breeding but I’ve had the most success keeping them moist with low ventilation at room temps, with live moss in the bin (idk if that’s necessary or not but they enjoy it). The second one is a juvie A. vulgare, and while I’m not super partial to them, they come in a lot of wild color forms!

    Thanks for the compliments on the ornatus! They’re definitely one of, if not my #1 favorite species. I’m currently keeping six species, those being P. ornatus, P. muscorum, P. scaber ‘Calico’, A. nasatum, P. pruinosus and A. granulatum. Nothing too crazy at the moment.
     
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  13. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    This is awesome! Thank you so much for IDing them. Looked up A. vulgare and saw the color forms. Wow! Thanks for telling me about all the colors. I feel like I've seen some in the wild that were a little more on the bluish side (but not nearly as blue as in the pics). Maybe I'll try and collect some of those. I might keep my eyes open for some more Philoscia muscorum too. It sounds like I might have the right conditions for breeding them :D.

    All of the species you're keeping look like cool ones. I do especially like your P. ornatus and your P. scaber ‘Calico’. Were some of your species WC or did you have to purchase all the different kinds?
     
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  14. Jurdon

    Jurdon Arachnosquire Active Member

    Thank you! My muscorum, nasatum, and calico scabers are all wild-caught. Though, I doubt I have any truly wild individuals left in my scaber colony, it’s been going strong for over a year now!

    And some vulgare do have a blue tint, but most truly blue isopods are infected with an iridovirus that discolors and eventually kills them. You’ll know the difference, it’s a very unnatural looking shade of blue. I have some interesting vulgare around my house, but I’ve been around them all my life so I really just don’t have a motivation to keep em. You’ll want to give the vulgare good ventilation, Armadillidium thrive with it (though nasatum is more adaptable than most)
     
  15. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Ah, I'll try to leave really blue ones alone then, thanks! I don't think we have the calico scabers around here but it would be so cool to see those in the wild.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018 at 5:25 PM
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