1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

I'm new to this world

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by KingDontay, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. darkness975

    darkness975 a Dream Within a Dream Arachnosupporter

    Advertisement
    Looking forward to seeing what you end up getting! :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. KingDontay

    KingDontay Arachnopeon

    I have no idea how to find a female.
     
  3. crone

    crone Arachnodemon Active Member

    Uh, guys. To my knowledge a G. rosea is not a New Mexican T. I'm sure all we have is Aphonopelma.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. crone

    crone Arachnodemon Active Member

    OP, what part of New Mexico are you from? I REALLY don't believe that G. roseas are native New Mexicans.
    If he truly is, then my guess he released outside by his owner to create FrankenTs. In that case, grab thAt boy back and keep him in a cage!!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  5. mconnachan

    mconnachan Arachnoprince Active Member

    when ordering a spider of whatever species you would like, you can choose....they sell males, females and slings, order online it's so simple.
     
  6. mconnachan

    mconnachan Arachnoprince Active Member

    I'm sure she's talking about a T from a store, that's the way I'm reading it, yeah the OP would like a T from a store a G. rosea.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

    1,723
    4,349
    353
    NC
    Females are a bit harder to find since they don't roam far from their burrows unless they have to. The MM you caught had left his burrow to find a lady before his time was up so you'll see them a lot more. Unfortunately, I don't live in an area that has wild tarantulas so I don't have first hand information on finding/catching tarantulas in the wild. @advan and @Austin S. both post photos of tarantulas they have found in the wild. They could likely give you tips on what to look for and how to coax them out of their burrows. I'll look later tonight and see if I can't find you some posts on people collecting wild caught tarantulas from the mid west.

    There is always the option of buying a captive bred one like the rest of us. There is nothing wrong with that either. If I lived in an area with a wild T that wasn't endangered (and had no laws protecting the species) I personally would like to own a locally caught one.

    Glad to hear your getting good info on tarantulas. Good luck in the hobby.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

    1,723
    4,349
    353
    NC
    Your right, there are no G. roseas (native) in NM. If you found one in the wild down there you should catch and remove it as it doesn't belong in that area and would be an invasive species. You definitely wouldn't want it to mate with local females and cross species. The male she caught was not that species and looked like a Aphonopelma of some type from the photo which would be right for a native NM tarantula.

    The G. roseas came later in the online order part. :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  9. crone

    crone Arachnodemon Active Member

    Thanks @Trenor. I'm still a greenhorn, and have a hard, not to mention non time in IDing.
     
  10. crone

    crone Arachnodemon Active Member

    Why the disagreement?
     
  11. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

    1,723
    4,349
    353
    NC
    No worries. I couldn't tell you which Aphonopelma species it is. Just that it looks like it belongs to that group. :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. My first guess would be outside
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Funny Funny x 1
  13. mconnachan

    mconnachan Arachnoprince Active Member

    I'm really not sure what you're meaning, the OP has stated she would like a G. rosea, as far as I'm aware they're not native to NM so I can only come to the assumption she meant from a local store, there's no disagreement, I've not disagreed with you or anyone else for that matter - Apart from taking a wild specimen, that's the only disagreement I have had in this entire thread. ;) Ah I see what you mean the disagree comment under your post, yes, I don't think the spider is a hybrid it's a MM from NM it's native to there. that's why the disagree under your post, if it is in fact a hybrid then yes it would be best to recapture the FrankenT you're right.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. Yeah, I was just looking on youtube for NM tarantula information -- enjoyed learning about NM migration of males during mating season.
    Knew this was common in CA and CO (mass highway crossings) but didn't know it happened in NM too -- that's a LOT of Ts.

    Murphy's Law: If you go herping -- you'll find a female T. If you go looking for a female T -- you'll find a rattlesnake. lol
    OP: Be careful out there!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  15. mconnachan

    mconnachan Arachnoprince Active Member

    Looking at the OP, the photo looks like an Aphonopelma, which are native to NM, so it makes sense to me anyway that when the OP posted regarding a G. rosea she was talking about one from a store, @crone do you see where I'm coming rom now, I wasn't disagreeing with you, I was taking everything into consideration and have come to the conclusion that I've stated. No malice intended, no harm no foul, all's cool pal.:)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. sasker

    sasker Arachnoknight Active Member

    @KingDontay You wrote that did months of research. May I ask how and where you conducted your research? You would not have had any difficulty identifying your WC (wild caught) tarantula as a mature male if you really did months of research. I think you came to the right place for answers when you posted on arachnoboards :)

    I think it is a good thing that you released it back into the wild so this pure-bred mature male can hopefully create hundreds of babies.

    If you choose to get a specimen from the wild, you will have to search a bit harder. MM are often out and about, searching for love, but females and slings/juvis are mostly hiding in their burrow. The link below gives a bit of an idea how and where to find them. Just be careful not to spook any rattlers.



    However, I think it is indeed easier to order your first tarantula online. This way you can purchase what you want, not what the local pet shop has in store (often mislabeled, in poor condition, of unknown gender) and you don't need to politely listen to the misinformation provided by the shop's employee who doesn't know the difference between a guppy and gerbil.

    But please, before your order, do some more research on the species that you want to buy before you place your order. Correct me if I am wrong, but I have the feeling you would benefit from doing some more research.

    By the way, although G. rosea/porteri is often considered a good beginner species, many who have them disagree because they are pet rocks with mood swings and the tendency to go on hunger strike for months for no apparent reason. There are loads of good threats on this forum about what makes a good beginner species and why.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  17. ShyDragoness

    ShyDragoness Arachnosquire Active Member

    I would recommend getting a Brachypelma Albopilosum as a starter but I feel like everyone is unique in what they choose
     
  18. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    id suggest G. pulchripes...cheap, easily found, really cool and one of the very best beginner sp.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  19. KingDontay

    KingDontay Arachnopeon

    I got a sling. Its supposed to be a Brazilian giant white knee tarantula
     
    • Like Like x 3
  20. KingDontay

    KingDontay Arachnopeon

    I researched how to do setups & care for them. I honestly didnt care about gender or the type. I just wanted a pet. I will look more into the different kinds of tarantulas & their physiology. Thank you!
     
    • Like Like x 2