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ID help: did I just find H. arizonensis?

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by many many legs, Jul 4, 2019.

  1. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Found it outside its burrow last night in ensenada, mexico. I've been seeing tons of tiny bark scorpions around here, but this one is much bigger and chunkier than them, maybe 4 inches. It also kicks around the sand in its enclosure, unlike my bark scorpions. Is it a desert hairy scorpion? That'd make my day :)
    20190703_232846.jpg
     
  2. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnobaron Active Member

    It doesn't look like a Desert Hairy to me. Maybe an Anuroctonus sp., or Paruroctonus sp.? @NYAN, @ArachnoDrew, @RTTB, any ideas?

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  3. Dry Desert

    Dry Desert Arachnobaron Active Member

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    If it's about 4 ins. and was found in Mexico it's probably Centruroides chiapanensis - toxic.
     
    • Disagree Disagree x 2
  4. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince

    Definitely not a Centruroides.. Not Hadrurus.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. AzJohn

    AzJohn Arachnoking Old Timer

    Maybe vaejovis.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  6. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Mexico is pretty big tho. Those are found in central/south. I'm very far north-west in baja norte. There have been hairy scorpion sightings near here, but yeah idk. I went on a walk with a blacklight last night and saw maybe a dozen baja bark scorpions, all 1-2" long. Those are common and always run away to find cover. This guy was notably huge in comparison and was just outside its burrow. It dashed into its hole as I approached, something I've never seen a baja bark scorpion do. It was also waaaaayyy faster than a bark scorpion when I coaxed it out.
     
  7. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

  8. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnobaron Active Member

    I agree with @RTTB, definitely not a Centruroides. 4 inches is pretty big for Vaejovis sp. as well

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  9. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

    After some searching, I think it may be vaejovis confusus. Though there are a lot of vaejovis species that look really similar, these occur in northern mexico and look very, very similar to mine. Still up for debate tho. Second guess would be Vaejovis hirsuticauda (now called Kochius hirsuticauda), but its claws and colors are a bit off from what I have, so probably not.
     
  10. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

    I took a look just now, I think I may have been excited and added an inch originally. Does look closer to 3 inches. and actually much darker top of body than photo lets on.
     
  11. neubii18

    neubii18 Arachnosquire

    Looks almost identical to the Paruroctonus species we have in So cal, although slightly a different color. I would bet Parurctonus.
     
  12. Mordax8393

    Mordax8393 Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Not (para)vaejovis confusus based on claw shape/size. Not K. histricauda based on telson structure. Certainly not Hadrurus or Centruroides.

    Almost certainly Paruroctonus sp., send me detailed pictures of: claw dentition and dorsal and ventral views of the tail and I can get it to species for you
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  13. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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  14. Dry Desert

    Dry Desert Arachnobaron Active Member

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    @NYAN
    @RTTB
    As we now have a new size and a more accurate location will be able to ID better. Centruroides chiapanensis is the only one I know of that's 100 +mm ( 4ins. ) in Mexico.As it's only 3ins. now, maybe even less, whole different ball game.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  15. brandontmyers

    brandontmyers Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Probably Paruroctonus silvestrii. It is known from Ensenada.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

    wow, once again, you nailed it! That looks just like what I have. Anything I should know if I plan on keeping it? Thank you so much.
     
  17. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Just want to update the thread with a pic I took of the scorp next to a 1" US quarter. So yes, I was maybe a little over enthusiastic about its size. To be fair though, the only other scorps around here are C. exilicauda, so this thing feels like a monster to me! Scorpion measurements are made from head to end of tail right? If so I'd guess its about 2.25"? I appreciate all the feedback so far. Thanks everyone :shame:

    IMG_20190705_173519_358.jpg
     
  18. Mordax8393

    Mordax8393 Arachnosquire Active Member

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    P silvestrii is possible but not certain, there are a few more almost identical species out there.
     
  19. brandontmyers

    brandontmyers Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Very true. The only other species from the 'boreus' microgroup found in Baja is P. arnaudi which is only known from the Socorro Sand Dunes. The other species found in Baja Norte are going to be psammophiles and have a distinct yellow color. I believe that this would be the only one in the area with this coloration. This particular specimen could absolutely be something different, however based on location I do believe P. silvestrii is correct.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. many many legs

    many many legs Arachnosquire Active Member

    Yeah, it digs little "burrows" under the local rocks and wood I provided it, is very fast/skittish and was found in a rocky coastal scrubland. seems to fit the description. I agree that its coloration is really pretty based on what I've seen online. Are these communal at all? it's enclosure is def big enough for two.