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how long do paraphidippus aurantius take to grow

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Wolfspidurguy, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. Wolfspidurguy

    Wolfspidurguy Arachnobaron

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    ive had a male and female for about a month now and no signs of molting happening soon although niether of them are eating
     
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  2. Chuckiee

    Chuckiee Arachnopeon

    Every jumping spider have to molt 5 or 6 times before they become adults so considering average lifespan of jumping spider (which is around a year) than they COULD molt every 2nd month I say they COULD not that they NEED...but either your jumping spider is adult or its not "RIPE TIME" for molting,just wait some more time and when they stop eating than that could be pre-molt,still good luck
     
  3. The wolf

    The wolf Arachnobaron Active Member

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    I find they moult very often to begin with then slow down and by the time it's their penultimate moult it will take them ages to get round to it,I'm not actually sure if jumpers are seasonal or not so they could live through a winter and last a year as an adult

    Also are you sure their not mature
     
  4. This is my question as well. How do you know they aren't matured already? Can you post clear pics of the Male (a dorsal and another particularly showing the palps would be helpful) and of the female (a clear ventral focusing on the abdomen near the book lungs and a dorsal shot)?
     
  5. Wolfspidurguy

    Wolfspidurguy Arachnobaron

    yeah the male doesnt have a hint of green on him as for the female ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
     
  6. The wolf

    The wolf Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Pics of the female,more because I'm bored than anything else
     
  7. Are these the same spiders from weeks ago? Did you ever look into Eris? I don't think the male is Paraphidippus. If you try to breed them, you may end up with a devoured male.
     
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  8. Wolfspidurguy

    Wolfspidurguy Arachnobaron

    i know its the same species because ive seen older ones around that do have the green on it
     
    • Clarification Please Clarification Please x 1
  9. That doesn't mean it's the same species. There are quite a few that look "like" P. aurantius but very slightly in color, marking, chelicerae size, etc, but are from an entirely different genus. But ok. I've put in my two cents on both of your threads and that's all I can do. Good luck with your spiders.
     
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  10. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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    they often overwinter as sub-adults, then mature the following spring.
     
  11. Wolfspidurguy

    Wolfspidurguy Arachnobaron

    okay i mean like the male i have doesnt have a green stripe down its back yet because its not matured enough to gain the coloration but ive seen other males around that look the exact same but they have the stripe