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HELP!! Rose acting very strange!!

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Gillian Pajor, May 15, 2018.

  1. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    My boyfriend just got a grammastola Rosa from someone and its legs are bent close to it's body and its shaking side to side and kicking it's legs up and they kinda twist weirdly when they up in air, what is goin on?

    Also she can't walk in straight line apparently. There is dirty coating her toes which idk might be problem too, someone help
     
  2. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnolord Active Member

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    The dirt on the toes shouldn't be a problem, but from the way you described its movements it sounds like your rosea most likely has DKS symptoms.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2018
  3. spookyvibes

    spookyvibes Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Please post pictures of the tarantula.
    Is she moving like this?
     
  4. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    This is 3 images of her. It's not like the video it's more of a wobble like she can't catch her balance when she walks. We are trying to get the caked on dirt on her toes and legs off still
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnobaron Active Member

    Do you know how old the T is? Do you know what sex it is?

    I'm so not an expert, but could it be a mature male nearing the end of its natural life span? Just a hunch... :confused:
     
  6. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    The way the spider curls the legs dehydration may be the issue here. Place the whole front end of the spider in a shallow bowl of water to allow it to drink. Don't worry, it's very difficult to drown a spider.

    That does not exclude the possibility that it's a mature male - the pics are not clear enough on that.
     
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  7. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    These are of new pictures of her. We tried putting her in water and she did at first drink but now she wont anymore. She likes to walk with her fangs out to, not in a threatening way or anything, just out. Like well pick her up and her fangs will sometimes touch our fingers or palms and drag around
    .
     

    Attached Files:

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  8. Nightshady

    Nightshady Dislike Harvester Arachnosupporter

    Generally not a good idea to handle T’s, and especially ones that seem ill. Has it been eating? It’s abdomen looks a little shriveled.
     
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  9. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnobaron Active Member

    Is that tissue paper wet? Do you have her in ICU? If yes, it's probably a very bad idea. This is an arid species and doesn't do well in humid, stuffy conditions. You should put her in a well ventilated enclosure with dry substrate, having only a shallow water dish with fresh water in it. I'm not sure what you meant by "We tried putting her in water", but you should only put her mouth parts into the water, not the whole spider. You could also try and flip her on her back and give her some water right into her mouth, slowly and patiently, a pipette (like an eye dropper or such) works very well.

    And like Nightshady said, it's not a good idea to handle your T, especially not in her current condition. She'd probably get stressed out even more.

    Oh, and again... do you know the age and sex of your T?
     
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  10. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    we led her onto his hand and moved her from one cage to the next cause it was the simplest and quickest way to do it at the time

    WE had her in an ICU for 48 hours and it seemed to help a little but we moved her to a dry towel substrate because when we tried with the dry coconut she flipped out and started banging into everything. When we got her she had caked dirty up her legs and she was obviously neglected with the condition we got in her. But we have had this species before so we know what is normal for them. And yes, he picked her carefully and lowered her mouth near the water where she did drink a little. Now she will step into the water dish but wont drink anything and stand there. We were thinking about flipping her on her back and doing the eye dropper but she seemed to be doing well with this before. Shes been with us about a week and has gotten better then leveled out.

    As for feeding, now she wont eat. We offered crickets and roaches and left them with her for 24 hours. She avoided them and if they brushed her she quickly moved away but we noticed her abdomen is small but she just wont eat for us. Though the ICU did help give her more strength because she is walking slightly more normal now but its still not what it should be so we might try ICU again in a few days we just didn't want to stress her out
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2018
  11. Lokee85

    Lokee85 Arachnoknight Active Member

    An ICU (i.e. a small moist stuffy enclosure) can do more harm than good for an arid desert species like G. rosea. In fact, it can kill your spider. If she's moving around on her own, keep her in her normal enclosure with an always-full water dish. It may take several weeks for her to recover fully, but continuously putting a desert species in a moist environment will do nothing more than stress her out and possibly cause her health to deteriorate further. She will get MUCH more hydration from a full water dish than from any kind of moist paper towel or anything like that.

    As for feeding, I would wait for a couple of weeks to try feeding again. Give her a chance to rehydrate more and settle down. G. rosea can go for really long time without eating, and right now hydration is more important.
     
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  12. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    alright i will try that most of my species I have that have needed it ended up greatly profiting from ICU but most of mine where high hydration spiders and none of my boyfriends spiders have ever needed it before
     
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  13. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    When did they need it and how did they profit from it? If they started to move around more they did that because they called up their last reserves to GET OUT of that death trap. And what is a 'high hydration spider' supposed to be??

    If you have a moisture loving species you should have it on moist substrate. If more than one of your spiders ever seemed dehydrated and therefore, by your conclusion, needing an ICU you are doing something seriously wrong.

    Spiders need to drink, not a sauna. They can't take up moisture via their exoskeleton

    If she's actually better after the ICU (I somehow doubt that) then she possibly managed to drink from the wet towels. She could have had that without you putting her in that deadly contraption for 48 (48!!) hours.

    NO spider EVER needs an ICU!
     
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  14. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    I just found this quote by one of the moderators here on another thread about a G. rosea:

     
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  15. Andrea82

    Andrea82 Arachnoking Active Member

    Is it a mature male? I can't see the pedipalps...
     
  16. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnobaron Active Member

    That's what I suspected, but I never got an answer to my questions how old or what sex that spider is. :rolleyes: ;)
     
  17. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    The spider appears to have been exposed to a toxin...but dehydration could also be causing the issue.

    The thing that worries me is this:

    " most of my species I have that have needed it ended up greatly profiting from ICU"

    This seems like its not something new for you...which makes me think there is something wrong with they way they are being kept. Which leads to obvious questions, specifically about heating...are you using a lamp? A mat? or some other method of heating? Keeping them in direct sunlight?

    There's gotta be something, because this isn't something that should be a common occurrence...in fact it should be incredibly rare...like winning the lottery rare.
     
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  18. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    It's not a mature male. All we know is we picked it up last week from a guy getting rid of it
     
  19. AnimalNewbie

    AnimalNewbie Arachnobaron Active Member

    So are you heating it???
     
  20. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnosquire

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    Yes there is a small HEATING pad on one side of it's cage