1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Help identifying scorpion

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by DM824, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

    Last edited: Nov 30, 2017
  2. FatherOfScorpions

    FatherOfScorpions Previously Sempiternal7 Active Member

    Do you have a picture of the scorpion?
     
  3. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

  4. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

  5. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

    [​IMG]
     
  6. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

  7. FatherOfScorpions

    FatherOfScorpions Previously Sempiternal7 Active Member

    Looks like its from the genus Centruroides. It might be a Caribbean dusky scorpion - Centruroides gracilis.
     
  8. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

    Here’s another picture. Is it dangerous?
     
  9. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

  10. FatherOfScorpions

    FatherOfScorpions Previously Sempiternal7 Active Member

    The scorpion is venomous, but much less toxic than others of its genus. It mostly just depends on how a person reacts to the sting. (Just like some people are allergic to bee stings) It looks like centruroides gracilis to me, if so, its potency would depend the origin of the scorpion. Ones from south American have a very potent venom as opposed to ones from Florida which are said the have a mild venom. I have one, never been stung, but I hear its a very painful.
     
  11. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince Active Member

    The Caribbean form is said to have a tad more potent venom than the US form. Not a 100% sure it's a C gracilis so be cautious regardless.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  12. darkness975

    darkness975 a Dream Within a Dream Arachnosupporter

    Scarcer food sources in the Caribbean?
     
  13. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince Active Member

    Scorpion venom is a curious thing. I think of some of the deadly Tityus and Centruroides that live in basically a jungle type habitat. One would think there is plenty of prey items. Yet their venom is quite potent. Interesting question and topic.
     
  14. DM824

    DM824 Arachnopeon

    Sounds like he came from Honduras. Thoughts about how poisonous he may be? Are we still talking bee sting with anaphylactic shock if there is an allergy?
     
  15. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    I'd jump in on the C. gracilis boat. Once you start pulling from Central American populations the venom level goes up by a good margin. Still most likely wouldn't kill you, but it'd put a damper on your day/week. Definite bad news if you're allergic to it.

    There was a paper that came out somewhat recently on scorps being able to adapt their venom based on predator harassment. I wonder if since the Central/South American versions are in a jungle habitat they're exposed to more predators, which has led to more toxic venom? Plenty of holes in that hypothesis I'm sure, with one issue being that even with the highly venomous Tityus stigmurus there's a significantly more venomous population somewhere in central Brazil (maybe? don't quote me on location).

    It could also be an arms race of sorts with prey items. These scorps would be found under bark or maybe under fallen logs, which limits prey types pretty significantly. I'd imagine commonly encountered prey items would be roaches and certain beetle groups. If they can't punch through the armor of a beetle, a roach would make an easy and convenient meal. However, roaches have evolved plenty of ways to not get eaten. Speed, excellent sensory structures and good reflexes. The scorps need to hit and they need to hit hard because they don't have the muscle to wrestle down a roach like most of the Scorpionidae (Heterometrus, Pandinus, etc.). A scrape of the stinger or stinging something big enough to escape could mean a lost prey item and expenditure of a physiologically costly resource (venom).
     
    • Like Like x 2