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Heading down the right path

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by AngelDeVille, May 8, 2018.

  1. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    My last experience with exotic pets was 14 years ago when my beloved 14’ Burmese Python passed at about age 18. Prior to that I had a Chilean Rose and a few Emperor scorpions.

    I feel I have enough past experience to start again with a couple slings.

    I am including my two boys in the hobby ages 15 and 5, and my wife will remain at a loving distance. The 5 year old listens well, and is excited to see the spiders grow up. The 15 year old thinks it’s cool but I don’t expect a whole lot of hands on since they are spiders and not teenage girls...

    I decided to focus on “bird-eater” types of Tarantulas because of growth, size potential, and display factors. Handling is not a remote priority, especially because of the youngests age.

    I think the ultimate goal will be 3-5 of the larger T’s.

    Any of your thoughts or input would be appreciated.
     
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  2. BobBarley

    BobBarley Arachnoprince

    Ahahahahahahahahaha

    There are a lot of large t's. A good start would be G. pulchripes. I see in your signature you have an N. chromatus and an L. parahybana (?).

    How are your current slings set up?
     
  3. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    I’ll add G. Pulchripes to the research list.

    I have a T. Blondi on the future wish list.

    ^^^^I may go juvenile on one of these^^^^^

    The L. Parahybana is in a ventilated hard plastic case from a phone charger cord. I have a dime sized piece of moss I’m keeping damp, and a little cypress mulch

    The N. Chromatus is arriving by friday and will be about 1/2” I bought a couple of enclosures and some cocofiber and tongs too.

    L. Parahybana is in the upper right corner. Moss is lower.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnobaron Active Member

    There is a spider in there? :wideyed::eek: Please tell me, it's just for rehousing purposes and you don't mean to keep it like this! o_O
     
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  5. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    Yes, just for rehousing, I have some better housing/materials on the way.

    She’s probably about 3/8”
     
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  6. darkness975

    darkness975 Dream Reaper Arachnosupporter

    If you do go the route of a Theraphosa spp. You will likely get a Theraphosa stirmi. True T. blondi is rare and expensive.
     
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  7. PidderPeets

    PidderPeets Arachnolord Arachnosupporter

    Honestly I can't think of too much that hasn't already been stated. Perhaps an A. geniculata would be another good addition. I would just be wary of their appetites and the fact that they think literally everything is food.

    I personally would wait a bit until the LP has grown so you can get a feel for a truly ravenous species and decide whether these big, hungry species that you're seeking are really something you feel comfortable with your kids around. My LP is a little over 3 inches and she’s the only tarantula I have that I would never trust an inexperienced person to feed and I wouldn't trust a child to even be around her.

    Lasiodora sp., Nhandu sp., and Theraphosa sp., are also all known to be prone to kicking hairs and with particularly irritating hairs. And repeated exposure to these hairs cause progressively worse reactions, so that's another thing to be wary of.

    I'm not trying to discourage you from tarantula keeping, and the larger species are always interesting. I just want to make sure you know all the risks involved before you potentially get in over your head, especially with kids involved. Kids have an innate curiosity and the 15 year old is also exposed to peer pressure and the desire to seem cool amongst friends, and that could easily lead to poor decisions when you or your wife aren't around.

    These are just things to consider.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2018
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  8. PanzoN88

    PanzoN88 Arachnobaron Active Member

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    2-3 years down the road, I highly recommend a P. cancerides and P. atrichromatus (especially P. atrichromatus, though they are rare)
     
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  9. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    Absolutely!

    I dont recall the exact species, but the local shop did have a larger specimin but the abdomen was almost bare. The creature was either very tempermental or very stressed. I did feel sorry for it, but for sure it would be too much for me to handle right now.

    I’m pretty handy, so I’m planning a bookshelf where they can be easily viewed, fed and cleaned with minimal handling and stress to them.

    Both of my boys are very responsible, but I’m considering locking thrm..
     
  10. PidderPeets

    PidderPeets Arachnolord Arachnosupporter

    That doesn't surprise me. I got lucky with the fact that neither of my N. chromatus kick very often, but they both will bolt away if they detect even the slightest movement. But mine also have well established burrows, so they thankfully run down their burrow instead of up and out of the enclosure.

    My LP on the other hand only lasts a few weeks after molting before she has some bare patches again. :shifty: And I'm definitely starting to get worse reactions each time I get her hairs on me.

    I personally would suggest locking them up if you're already considering it. That way there's peace of mind that no accidents can happen
     
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  11. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    I have the family listed in my sig line... I’m good for the forseable future...

    Lasiodora Parahybana, is an active little guy, I dont think he realizes he is only about 1/2”.


    Acanthoscurria geniculata, and Nhandu Chromatus, arrive Saturday, along with substrate, and some nifty little containers.

    I should have a tracking number for Theraphosa Stirmi and Chilobrachus Dyscolus shortly.

    I plan on printing up a label for each one. How does this sound for info...

    1. Scientific name
    2. Common name
    3. Humidity requirements... ie; wet sub, dry sub, etc...

    Anyother tips?

    All are terrestrial, and have the same feeding requirements, so I don’t think I need that on the label. I just want to learn the names better and make sure I keep them properly hydrated..

    CEF16CB9-E475-483A-8860-074F6DC089E1.jpeg

    All are 1/2” EXCEPT for the T. Stirmi, and she is a 2”

    I am getting a little confused on the Chilobrachys sp Vietnam blue...

    What is the correct scientific name, and common name?

    Scientific name I’m finding “Chilobrachys sp” or “Chilobrachys Dyscolus” or “Chilobrachys sp. blue Vietnam”

    Common name I am finding, Asian smokey earth tiger” or “Burma chocolate brown”. Or is the common name VietNam Blue?
     
  12. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

    I just label mine with the scientific name, the symbol for male or female (if the sex is known), and its pet name if it has one.

    For example:

    Grammostola pulchra
    "Bulldozer"

    Acanthoscurria geniculata
    "Genicula"


    I would not recommend Chilobrachys to new keepers, as it is an Old World genus with potent venom and a nasty disposition.

    That being said, I believe Chilobrachys dyscolus (blue color form) is the one commonly known as the Vietnamese blue tarantula. (Most of don't even use common names here, because they are often ambiguous.)
     
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  13. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    I’m not positive they will show enough personality yet to get a name, but we shall see!


    It looks like this is the only Old World on my list, they will all get a pretty wide berth, and minimal cuddling, but they are so darn cute....

    The common name is a lot easier for me to remember for now.
     
  14. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    I am hearing tale of care sheets posted here.

    I can't seem to find them.

    Conflicting information on the interwebz.....
     
  15. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    Acanthoscurria Geniculata, and Nhandu Chromatus arrived healthy and happy yesterday.

    I have them in 2 1/4” square enclosures with coco substrate and moss.

    N. Chromatus has started a burrow.

    My Lasiodora Parahybana is in a round vial about 1 3/4” with coco substrate and moss. She is slightly larger than the other two, and is very active, as is A. Geniculata. L. Parahybana did make a very small hide under a moss chunk, and retreats there rarely.
    I am considering moving her to a 4” square enclosure, and taking up the extra space with a moss pile.

    I do have various chunks of cork bark but I think they would clutter their space.

    Here is N. Chromatus and her started burrow. The set up for A. Geniculata is the same, but she is proudly displaying herself.

    [​IMG]

    ^^^ the substrate in pic in the last post looks wetter than it is, but I do think it is too wet^^^

    L. Parahybana in her hide, and vial. She seems content so I’m unsure if I should move her to the 4” enclosure.

    [​IMG]

    Feeding:

    N. Chromatus and A. Geniculata both ate a pre-kill cricket slightly smaller than they are overnight.

    L. Parahybana ate two...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 13, 2018
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  16. draconisj4

    draconisj4 Arachnoknight Active Member

    I think a 4" enclosure would be too large for that spider, maybe a 4 oz deli cup would work better. I'd also give it a bit more substrate, they like to burrow when young. Mine was a pet hole when it was very small, it would come out regularly but would run down it's burrow at the least disturbance. Now that's it's 3 inches it's front and center and in your face, lol. Doesn't even use it's hide.
     
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  17. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    She is rarely in her hide, and thats as deep as she has made it. She already has the attitude!

    I’ll scout around for those deli cups, With the way she is eating she wont be in it for long.
     
  18. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    My 1/2” Nhandu Chromatus has earned a name...

    She has made a vertical shaft with a horizontal hide...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    A54076B2-0AE6-43E3-AB1C-DAB21DB18DE8.png
     
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  19. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    My Other 5 T's should be finally shipping out today.... from slings to 1-2" Shipping was delayed because of a molt.

    The 3 slings I have now have gotten into a boring routine....

    Lasiodora Parahybana hasn't eaten in the last 8 days or so, so I will stop offering until next week or until after a molt. She has made a short vertical burrow in one corner of her enclosure and seems to be content to sit there most of the time. I'm expecting a Molt soon.

    Acanthoscurria Geniculata is a little piggy and just ate almost a whole mealworm a couple days ago. She made a very short vertical burrow that leaves her rather substantial backside exposed. I do expect her to stop eating and molt soon.

    Nhandu Chromatus DigDug has expanded her burrow and spends most of her time in it. She hasn't eaten in about 8 days as well, and I am expecting a molt with her as well.
     
  20. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    My Seven Wonders package arrived today!

    G. Pulchripes is so incredibly mellow, she hasnt moved much from that spot since I put her in there, but she did spend some time grooming herself.

    [​IMG]

    T. Stirmi is feisty as hell, I am so glad I transfered her in the bathtub... no incidents but she is fast.

    [​IMG]

    Grammostola Pulchra transferred easliy, but hid under her cork for a bit.

    [​IMG]

    Brachypelma Albopilosum transfered easily and was relaxed, but when I went to take a picture she had been furiously working on her burrow.

    [​IMG]

    Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens
    was super exciting to transfer, if I wasnt so fast and lucky with the paintbrush, I may still be trying to find her....

    [​IMG]