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Hapalopus sp.Columbia large breeding discussion

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by 14pokies, Jul 15, 2017.

  1. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    Just to get everyone up to speed.. I have an adult female H.sp Columbia that molted fifty days ago and a male that matured sixty days ago.

    This last week the female was fed heavily untill she refused a meal.. In total she ate six large crickets and three big fat super worms.

    The male since maturing has showed little interest in food.. He has only eaten three small crickets since his molt.

    He made his first sperm web that I have seen four or so days ago so I introduced him into the females enclosure that next night..

    He did absolutely nothing for two hours and the female never came out of her hide.. .. I watched and waited while he scrunched in the corner and then it happened.. I fell a sleep... Yup my dumb :mooning: passed out with a mature male in the females enclosure..

    Here's the best part.. When I woke up I had forgotten that I paired them that night :(... I thought I had the cage out for feeding which I had also done that night..

    So today while walking through my room I saw strange webbing in my H.sp Columbia females enclosure and was like why the hell is she making sperm webs... That's when it all came back to me :bored:....

    So long story short(ish) they have been cohabbed for close to three days and he is still alive.. I see no evidence that the female has left her burrow although I admit that's easy enough to miss.. I assume possibly(?)they are mating because I found one sperm web on the floor of the enclosure and one fresh one still hanging presumably from last night..

    So just general opinion what are the odds they have mated? What are the odds the only reason he is still alive is because the female has no clue he is there?

    I have seen one video of a female of this species kill and eat the male during breeding.. Does anybody know if that's more of a fluke and maybe the females of this species are more tolerant of males than most terrestrials?

    This is my first time pairing this species so feel free to offer any experience or tips you have pertaining to this species in particular..

    I'm honestly not sure whether to leave him untill he is consumed or pull him, give him a few days and reintroduce him to the female after I have removed her from her hide/ burrow.. If the females aren't tolerant of the males the only reason he is still alive is because she hasn't noticed he is there and I need to pull him ASAP..
     
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  2. sdsnybny

    sdsnybny Arachnoangel Active Member

    My female ate 2 males on 2 different overnight stays. The first time she molted out, the second she produced a sac which she can barley fit underneath her. She was fed large female red runners till she started killing them out of annoyance both time before pairing and looked like a huge overripe grape about to split. both times the male was food and she ate all of him. I'll let you now how many slings in about 20 more days.
    They dont live long after maturing so letting her eat him may increase your odds of a sac. If you don't have another female to pair I would leave him. After pairing I lowered her temps to about 65-70 put her in a dark corner for 3 weeks, brought her back out raised temps flooded her substrate and she dug to the bottom and made the sac within a week.
     
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  3. campj

    campj Arachnoknight

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    I have two females and had a mature male. Tried pairing both females with the male a few times each, but same thing as you 14pokies... male kind of wandered around and females either didn't recognize his presence, or chased him off. I tried adjusting humidity and temp to see if it made a difference, but nothing was working. Both females molted around the same time, so after some good feeding I tried again. Same story, so I decided to just leave the male in one of the enclosures (he was getting old anyway). He lived in the enclosure with the female for four days, and on the fifth he was nowhere to be seen. That is until I looked in her tube web and she was eating him. I have no idea if they mated or not. I'll try lowering temperatures for a bit and bring them back up to try to trigger a sac.
     
  4. campj

    campj Arachnoknight

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    @sdsnybny oh by the way, how do you go about dropping temperature for a single enclosure? Relocate to a different room and drop the temp for the whole room with air conditioner? Or is there a better way? I actually wanted to start a thread about this because I have a few Pamphobeteus pairs that I'll likely have to adjust temp on, but you mentioned it so I figured it's an easy kill right here if you can answer.
     
  5. sdsnybny

    sdsnybny Arachnoangel Active Member

    Since its a dwarf in a 6x6x6 enclosure I picked a wall in my home that stays the coolest and set it directly on the linoleum covered concrete. I have seen others use a small air conditioner in a closet.
     
  6. boina

    boina Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

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    Really? Mine is 19 months mature now and just ate a small roach 2 weeks ago (it was only the third time he ate in all 19 months!!!). But sadly, he hasn't been paired :(. So is he the big exception?
     
  7. sdsnybny

    sdsnybny Arachnoangel Active Member

    MM dwarfs in general dont live as long as a full size T MM's, it seems to be hit or miss with them. I have had some last over 12-20 months and some go 3-10 months.
     
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  8. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Very informative post.. Thank you..

    My initial instinct after not noticing any breeding behavior from the male was to pull him out or go about it the way some people breed GBB.. The first few males are cannon fodder.. That's why I didn't pull him as soon as I realized I had left him in there.. I figured if he get's eaten then maybe he got an insert either right before or while he was being eaten. If not I have access to more males to pair her with.. I also figure if she eats a MM it will click that hey it's time to breed.. With the males of this species being rumored to live very short lives after maturity.. Whats the loss really..

    I'm half tempted to pull her hide out and see if her chasing him around a little will stimulate him to breed..

    I'm not sure what exactly I'll do but I'll post it along with the results..
     
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  9. spotropaicsav

    spotropaicsav Arachnobaron Active Member

    Following...following...like a novella:D, hope it turns out to your liking
     
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  10. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Thanks! I'll keep you posted..
     
  11. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Well about an hour ago I decided to remove the male so I could remove the females hide.. I did this so that I could pair them in a more traditional manner and hopefully see an insert or signs of interest in breeding from either Tarantula.

    I gave both Tarantulas a few minutes to get over the stress of the events and reintroduced the male..

    Upon introduction he slowly wandered over to the female and crawled over her back legs.. She slowly turned around and they sat facing each other for about three minutes.. Neither one of them showed any interest in the other.. Like seriously none at all.. He didn't seem scared and she didn't seem to care that there was another tarantula in her enclosure..

    After about three minutes she turned around and walked away.. He just sat there.. Like a chump.. I watched for another hour and absolutely no courting behavior has taken place.

    At this point I'm going to cohab them untill he is eaten. I'll put her hide back in once he has been consumed and cycle the female as @sdsnybny described..

    I'll post an update as soon as I see mating activity, he is consumed or she drops a sac..
     
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  12. campj

    campj Arachnoknight

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    It's weird, right? Same thing with BOTH of my females... no interest from either side whatsoever.

    Removed the hide, huh? Both my females made pretty elaborate tube webs incorporating the moss and fake plants I have in there with them. Yours didn't do anything like that?

    Best of luck to you.
     
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  13. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Pics worth a thousand words Lol. 20170721_003850.jpg
    I put this in and then added more sub untill it was even with the top and dug away around the opening so she could find it.. I had breeding in mind when I picked her up. I wanted to have easy access to the sac if I was successfull.

    The hide is roughly one and a half inches tall and was placed on top of about two inches of sub.. In all she had about three inches of depth to dig.. She didn't really do much digging though she just webbed the hell out of the inside of that hide and had a small oblong cavern dug about an inch down..

    Thanks the male is still in with her.. I plan on putting the hide back in over the weekend.. It's really funny but neither has made any attempt to dig a burrow in her enclosure.

    They just slowly roam around almost oblivious to each other.. I've never had a breeding like this..
     
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  14. boina

    boina Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

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    I want an "interesting" emoji..., or maybe "faszinating" ;)
     
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  15. campj

    campj Arachnoknight

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    Oh, I see now. Yeah, easy access to the sac is something I wouldn't have.

    I agree though, weird pairing for me too, and by far the most boring. I don't know what the folks in the breeding reports did differently, because their pairings sound like a compete 180 from what we've experienced.

    20170721_143242.jpg 20170721_142542.jpg 20170721_142637.jpg
     
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  16. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Well, at the very least the female must be tolerant of the male. Today I was curious if he has made it this long because the female simply wasn't hungry.

    I tossed in two crickets and she took one immediately the second one was also snatched up moment's later.
    She has the size to eat him easily so she must be OK with him in her enclosure because she was deffinately hungry.
     
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  17. boina

    boina Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

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    You seem to have discovered the secret of communal Hapalopus :confused::eek:
     
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  18. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Those are good looking setups though.. Live plants?
     
  19. campj

    campj Arachnoknight

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    Cool, thanks. I only use fake plants. Got those ones from Michael's and they're working out nicely. Those are the only tanks with that many though, most just have a few in the back as accent or whatever.
     
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  20. sdsnybny

    sdsnybny Arachnoangel Active Member

    How's this working out? any evidence of a sac yet?
    I pulled mine today (31 days) cuz its been very dry and hot, glad I did!
    Bunch of EWLs that were starting to turn raisin like ;( hope a boost of high humidity will help save at least a few.
     
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