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Got some isopods :)

Discussion in 'Insects, Other Invertebrates & Arthropods' started by Giygas, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. Giygas

    Giygas Arachnosquire

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    I decided to venture into the field by my house, its a isolated area, far away from any farms. I prepared a simple deli container enclosure with potting soil and some chunks of cork bark for hides.

    Its getting into the dry season here, so the isopods will start dying out. Luckily, i found 6 good sized ones, its not a lot, but im curious as to see whether a colony will form.

    They're the common grey species, in case anyone was wondering :)
     
  2. Pixxie

    Pixxie Arachnosquire

    I found a few the other day and didn't think to do that same thing until after I moved them out of the way from being crushed by feet. But I plan to go out and find some more soon. The iso's up here in VT are a lot cuter than the ones in SC.

    After reading about the possible benefits of putting iso's in with T's in "The Tarantula Keeper's Guide", it makes me wonder if anyone here has tried it, I want to try it, but I feel that with how big of an appetite my rosies have, they'll just devour them all as they find them. Anyone tried it? Would you recommend it? What do you use them for, Giygas?
     
  3. Giygas

    Giygas Arachnosquire

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    Well, until they start reproducing, ill be using them for my P.irminia. They require a moist environment in order to live, too dry (like the rosie) and they'll just die out. Ts will usually ignore them but some slings do take a nip at them occasionally :)
     
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  4. Pixxie

    Pixxie Arachnosquire

    Oh yeah, I didn't even think about how dry my rosies' cages are. Good thing you said that, haha. I guess I'll try them with my A. avic instead.
     
  5. Giygas

    Giygas Arachnosquire

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    Bury a small chunk of potato in the soil once in a while, keeps them alive and it dosnt mold easily.
     
  6. Yoxigan

    Yoxigan Arachnopeon

    I would do it. They breed fast. I know a lot about isopods, so feel free to ask me anything about them. By the way, Oniscus are not usually eaten. The ones you have are probably A.vulgare.
     
  7. Kruggar

    Kruggar Arachnobaron

    I don't mean to highjack this thread, but I wanted to share.
    Here's my Isopod container, I've only recently put it together. Any feedback would be great! :D


    I fold the cardboard and tear the edges, so there is more surface area for them, and the smaller buggies can easily access the grooves in the cardboard. I've also saturated the coco-fiber to keep the humidity up. With the lid closed it easily stays above 80%. They seem to really enjoy fish flakes and can be seen eating bits from the jungle mix.

    [​IMG]


    This container is only 11"x 7"x 3" tall, I put about 200 pinholes in the lid for air.

    [​IMG]


    You can't see any of the cardboard in this shot, but i assure you there are lots of isopods hiding in it. The mold shouldn't be a problem, yes? if so I'll scoop it out.

    [​IMG]


    Can anyone tell me what species these are? I've got some smaller ones, but I'm not sure if they are a difference species or immature instars.

    [​IMG]


    This is the only caramel coloured one. Is this different then the above? or just a morph?

    [​IMG]

    Thanks everyone! :D :D :D


    ;)

    ---------- Post added 05-03-2012 at 12:57 PM ----------

    Oh and if it helps people identify them, they were found in So. Ontario, under various decomposing wood, in a mixed forest. Thx
     
  8. I suspect the original poster will have no problems setting up a colony of them off a starter group of six, however another trip out into the field for another six wouldn't hurt!

    Mostly, I just wanted to express my fascination with the caramel isopod in the last post. Those are all Oniscus. I'm sure somebody would have suggested the color was due to a recent molt, but I've seen Oniscus molt a million times and have never seen a caramel colored one at any point. Isolate that one with a couple others (to ensure reproduction) and see what subsequent generations reveal. I have a yellow Porcellio that I want to share a photo of soon.

    And nice description about the set up!

    Here is a vid of an Oniscus asellus molting:

    [YOUTUBE]KCkeFVEqhDs[/YOUTUBE]
     
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  9. Kruggar

    Kruggar Arachnobaron

    Thank you! I like communicating as best as I can.

    That Caramel Isopod is definitely coloured that way. I've had to for weeks now and there has been no real change. I imagine that it's just a morph? You're certain that its not a different species? It seems slightly larger then its tub-mates, but I could be wrong.

    ---------- Post added 05-05-2012 at 09:08 AM ----------

    I'll keep an eye on it and hopefully post some pictures of it morphing too.
     
  10. I'm sure it's O. asellus, but that doesn't mean I'm right ;) !
     
  11. Kruggar

    Kruggar Arachnobaron

    I just wanted to let you know that I've found several more caramel ones in the same woods.. some are almost orange. interesting morphs, IMO. I've got about 5 in my setup now, so I should have some offspring.
     
  12. Fenn

    Fenn Arachnopeon

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    Isolde are probably my favorite "bug". I keep all kinds of species, and have never seen that color before. let us know what happens!
     
  13. Tenodera

    Tenodera Arachnobaron

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    I've noticed orange morphs occur locally, there are some woods and even individual logs that I can count on to find a couple colorful ones.