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Gibbifer californicus

Discussion in 'Insects, Other Invertebrates & Arthropods' started by Inverts4life1, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. Inverts4life1

    Inverts4life1 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Being an entomologist means I have an endless list of insects that I want to find. Last summer after moving to Colorado I was able to cross one of those off my list (along with quite a few others). While I was collecting ants I looked over and saw my very first Gibbifer californicus. After a multi minute jig of joy and air fist pumping I eventually took this picture. This species is in the family Erotylidae (pleasing fungus beetles) and the larvae feed on wood-destroying fungi. They are found in the southwest U.S and Mexico and I found them to be relatively numerous in northern CO.
     

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  2. Salmonsaladsandwich

    Salmonsaladsandwich Arachnoknight Active Member

    I bet these would be easy to breed provided a regular supply of shelf fungi.
     
  3. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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    they can be reared on plain white mushrooms, but they need to be big mushrooms, and the larvae demolish them quickly.

    the coolest thing about these beetles is their parental care- mothers help their larvae find new mushrooms
     
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  4. davehuth

    davehuth Arachnopeon Active Member

    I love absolutely everything I’ve just read in this thread! Beautiful beetle.
     
  5. arizonablue

    arizonablue Arachnosquire

    Can you give me some more details on this, please? I have always wanted to try raising these but I never did because I thought they needed a constant supply of shelf fungus, which would be difficult for me.
     
  6. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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    they dont require brackets for larval development, but those DO take a much longer time to spoil and are often the only fungi available in their habitat. Kinshi might work for their larvae

    adults need a sugar source, beetle jelly ought to work
     
  7. arizonablue

    arizonablue Arachnosquire

    Beetle jelly is easy enough, raising the larvae sounds like the more difficult part. :) When the larvae pupate, they hang from the fungus, right? How does that work with white mushrooms? Do the mushrooms need to be planted or would some (well-washed) mushrooms from the grocery store do just as well?
     
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  8. Smokehound714

    Smokehound714 Arachnoking Active Member

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    they're kinda like ladybeetle larvae, they will hang anywhere, provided it's a protected area, usually under rotting wood. they might actually accept dried mushrooms.

    they lay their eggs in rotting logs
     
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