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Giant African millipede in a Paludarium a good idea?

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by snej97, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. snej97

    snej97 Arachnopeon

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    Hi.

    I want to build a Paludarium which has the total size of 120cm x50cm x50cm(length x width x height)
    A Paludarium is a Aquarium and a Terrarium combined.
    Most of the Paludarium will not be water tho.
    The transition to water and earth will not be rapid but rather slow.
    My question is are the Millipedes "smart" enough to see that if they go deeper in water that they will drown?
    I was searching the whole internet for the past 2 weeks and i couldn't find any answer to my question.

    Im also sorry for my awkward english , i hope you people can understand what im trying to ask.
     
  2. desmess3000

    desmess3000 Arachnopeon Active Member

    Sounds like a cool idea...I know that many millipede keepers have had there millipedes drown in a water bowl that they could not get out of so your transition to water would need to be very gradual as you previously stated.
    Also make sure nothing is extended over the water were they could climb and potentially fall in the deep side.

    As far as your millipede just walking into the water and drowning I don't think that would happen...but I have never had more than a water bowl with mine so I can't say for sure...good luck.
    If you do this please take pics and keep us updated like I said I like this idea..but there may be some hazards to overcome.
     
  3. desmess3000

    desmess3000 Arachnopeon Active Member

    And you are doin just fine with your English...I understood you completely :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. mickiem

    mickiem Arachnoprince Active Member

    I agree with @desmess3000 - it isn't a matter of being smart, but in an unnatural environment, they may not intend to get into the water but find it accidentally. Post photos - it sounds lovely!
     
  5. LawnShrimp

    LawnShrimp Arachnobaron Active Member

    Millipedes are water-resistant and can survive underwater for hours or even days in some species. They are also smart enough to not enter water, but if you are planning on breeding any, the babies would likely drown just from the excess moisture.

    I assume a few adults could handle a paludarium but do consider the fact that their native habitat is desert, savanna, and seasonal rainforests, not marshes or riverbanks.
     
  6. snej97

    snej97 Arachnopeon

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    Wow.
    Im really thankful for all the replies , really helped me.

    It seems like it can be done but i dont really want to force them into an habitat they are not used to, thats certainly not something i want to do.

    Is there a millipede species that would fit in a paludarium better?
    Or is there a species that is more used to a marsh/riverbank?
    It can be smaller ones.
    Im not a big fan of centipedes but if there is a centipedes that would fit perfectly in a paludarium then i would consider it.
    Centipedes freak me a bit out.

    Like i said , i dont really want to force animals to live in a enviroment they are not used to.

    I haven't started working on the paludarium , i have all the materials here to start working(like styrofoam , epoxy resin, aquarium silicone and so on) but i just want to make sure how im going to build it to make sure every animals is happy about living in this paludarium.
    And to be honest i wouldn't really care if the babies would drown or have a hard time grow up.
    I dont want to breed more animals, im already breeding axolotls and thats enough work.
     
  7. LawnShrimp

    LawnShrimp Arachnobaron Active Member

    I think most millipedes will be treated the same way by this environment, sorry.

    Most non-desert species of centipede, such as S. subspinipes, S. dehaani, S. gigantea group are able to swim (though they don't like it) and would probably enjoy a paludarium. However, (this is impossible to get, though) there is a species of centipede that is partially aquatic, S. cataracta.

    GREAT video; first time I've seen a 'pede do this:
     
  8. snej97

    snej97 Arachnopeon

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    No worries, i appreciate it that you are honest.

    This is interesting.. i have seen that video before and it freaked me out to some degree.
    Not a big fan of centipedes..
    Way out of my comfortzone.

    But i will think about it.
     
  9. desmess3000

    desmess3000 Arachnopeon Active Member

    Now in no way would I ever say lawnshrimp is wrong for he has great knowledge of all things myriapod. But are there not rivers and streams in AGB natural habitat...I understand that the large majority are living in dryer conditions away from water but I'm sure there are some wild colonies living happily near a water source.
    As long as there is good ventilation keeping humidity down the only difference from there natural habitat would be the water itself...I am in no way an expert I am just really interested in this as well and lawnshrimp is shootin down my hopes:joyful:
    I personally would not choose AGB just because they are rare here in the states so I would want lots of babies.
    Would Chicobolus spinigerus work for this I wonder? There natural habitat is pretty wet...some of the island morphs could do well?
    Although I don't know how easy it is to get this species where you are.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. snej97

    snej97 Arachnopeon

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    AGB are not really rare in germany.
    I guess it depends on what you mean by rare.
    Its relatively expensive but nothing compared to what you pay for fishes for example.
    It depends on where you get them but its 10-20€ for a single AGB here..
    All the other millipedes are in the same price range.

    I checked Chicobolus spinigerus and there is a relatively close by breeder who sells them.
    Also damn... they look really cool.

    Oh and dont worry about ventilation.
    Im going to build a ventilation system with pc fans which you can control.(obviously im going to secure it with a piece of mosquito net on the inside)
    Humidity is also not a problem , im going to build a rain system which you can turn on and off to lower or higher the humidity.

    Ventilation system is pretty much a needed thing for a Paludarium.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
  11. snej97

    snej97 Arachnopeon

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    What about Tonkinbolus dollfusi?
    They also seem to live near water or atleast the closest compared to other millipedes.

    Oh and while im here writing so much..
    Do you people keep other animals inside the same terrarium where your millipedes are living?
    I wanted to keep bigger landsnails with millipedes but from what i heard its a really bad idea because they both dig underground.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
  12. mickiem

    mickiem Arachnoprince Active Member

    I was dividing a box of Ivories into two boxes of Ivories today. I took 1/2 of the old substrate from the original container. I carefully took it from the front, from top to bottom and then added new substrate. But when the front half of substrate was missing, millipede after millipede kept tumbling down the "cliff". They reminded me of minions or lemmings doing the same dumb thing over and over. I had to keep a little substrate on the bottom so they wouldn't get hurt. But my point is, I don't think millipedes always intend to do what they do. They just get those legs going and it all snowballs.
     
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    • Funny Funny x 1