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Genus Linothele

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Philth, Apr 22, 2014.

  1. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

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    Not really a true spider or a tarantula ( whatever that means) but the genus Linothele is a Mygalomorph spider in the family Dipluridae, sometimes referred to as Funnel web tarantula. They have been sporadically available in the hobby over the years, but not in great numbers, and are rarely bred here in the U.S. My increasing desire to keep and breed these have inspired me to start a thread dedicated to the Linothele genus. I searched and couldn't find a similar thread.

    Linothele fallax
    [​IMG]

    A young L. fallax taking on a dubia roach
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    Young female L. fallax
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    Later, Tom

    ---------- Post added 04-23-2014 at 12:21 AM ----------

    Linothele megatheloides ultimate male
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    Linothele megatheloides mating.
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    Linothele megatheloides ultimate male
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    Linothele megatheloides mating.
    [​IMG]

    Later, Tom
     
    • Like Like x 20
  2. MrCrackerpants

    MrCrackerpants Arachnoprince

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    Awesome :) Thanks for sharing. Do they live about a year?
     
  3. Nokturnal1980

    Nokturnal1980 Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Good looking spider thanks for sharing.

    Sent from my MB855 using Tapatalk 2
     
  4. They're so metallic! They look like little Ahkal-Teke horses...but in spider shape. Definitely going to have to keep my eye out in case I ever run into one.
     
  5. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

    I haven't owned a female long enough to get a idea how long they live. It took about a year for me to raise a spiderling to a mature male though. I'd expect the females to live longer.

    Later, Tom
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. awiec

    awiec Arachnoprince

    Aw dang, you're making me want to get back to true spider breeding again, but I would certainly jump at the chance of having one of those for sure.
     
  7. jecraque

    jecraque Arachnobaron

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    Diplurids and a few other non-tarantula mygalmorphs are at the top of my list. Thanks for reminding me why!
     
  8. Philth, I envy you! I have for a long time been interested in members of the family Dipluridae, but have yet to obtain even one!

    -JohnD.
     
  9. Beary Strange

    Beary Strange Arachnodemon

    I really love Linothele sp. but have yet to bring one home. Those spinnerets are so amazing. Thanks for sharing, lovely spiders. ^^
     
  10. NoahThomas43

    NoahThomas43 Arachnosquire

    Very nice Linothele fallaxes!
     
  11. dactylus

    dactylus Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Thanks for starting the Linothele thread Tom!! I am also keeping L. fallax and L. megatheloides. Both species are easy to maintain, gorgeous, and lightning quick!! Great spiders!

    :angelic:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Lucidd

    Lucidd Arachnoknight

    Wow, those spinnerets look like short legs!
     
  13. Tomek

    Tomek Arachnopeon

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    Yes! A topic for my favorite genus. At this moment I have 0.2.0 Linothele curvitarsis, 0.1.0 L. fallax and 0.1.6 L. megatheloides.

    Linothele curvitarsis:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Linothele fallax:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Linothele megatheloides:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Looking at these pictures made me realise again how much I like these spiders, but also how little I know about them. They are fast and great webbers, but I don't know how much eggsacs they lay, if they take care for them or just hang them in the web, if females keep on molting after becoming adult/fertile. In case of L. curvitarsis I also don't know how big females will get. I had one male (2nd picture) and two 'females' from about the same size. Tried to mate them, but at the day the male died I found old skins from both 'females'. They are visibly larger now, and might have some more growing to do. Now I hope to find another male soon.

    L. megatheloides is relatively easy to obtain in Europe, L. fallax more difficult and L. curvitarsis I have only seen a few times so far.
     
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  14. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

    Thanks for adding pics Tomek. I recently got some L. curvitarsis as well, but they are to small for me to photograph yet. I'm pretty sure they carry around the eggsacs, rather then suspend them somewhere. Time will tell for sure :)

    Later, Tom
     
  15. Tomek

    Tomek Arachnopeon

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    She doesn't carry anything, most of the time she is half in/out her retreat - without eggsac. Unfortunatly.
     
  16. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

    I'm pretty sure I was wrong when I said this lol. My first hatching of Linothele megatheloides

    [​IMG]

    Later, Tom
     
    • Like Like x 11
  17. RegallRegius

    RegallRegius Arachnosquire

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    Congrats on this - well done! :D
     
  18. edgeofthefreak

    edgeofthefreak Arachno-titled!

    What instar are these beauties? They already have such striking colouration, and those gorgeous long spinnerets!
     
  19. Philth

    Philth N.Y.H.C. Arachnosupporter

    They're 2nd instar, just started eating. Nice size for 2nd instar, about 1 inch already.

    Later, Tom
     
  20. dotdman

    dotdman Arachnobaron Old Timer

    That's one lovely looking brood. Congrats!