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GBB lost a leg, now looks like the start of a death curl

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by TheFox, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. TheFox

    TheFox Arachnopeon

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    I went to feed my juvinile GBB yesterday and noticed that one of it's legs was on the ground next to it. It hasn't molted in about a month(so I don't think it was related to a bad molt) and I was a little worried; but I know that Ts can drop legs and regenerate them over a couple molts, so I didn't worry too much. I've been keeping an eye on it to see if it gets any more serious and this morning when I went to check on it I noticed that some of it's back legs were skewed in weird positions and it looks like the end of it's legs are starting to curl up beneath it. It doesn't look like a full on death curl but I feel like it's the start of one. I'm really confused as to why this happened/is happening does anyone have any idea what could've happened or if there's anything I can do to encourage a recovery? The enclosure has a very low ceiling, and none of the decorations are sharp/have hard edges (also it's webbed over almost everything in there) so I don't think it's fall related or anything.
    I'll get a picture of it soon however I reached in with my tongs to make sure it was still alive and it moved out of the possible death curl position and more into a threat posture. When it was moving it did seem a little like it's back legs aren't functioning properly. Could it be DKS? Im just really confused as to why my T could be so injured right now so any insight would be greatly appreciated!

    You can kind of see from this picture the front legs curling up. Everytime I bring it's enclosure down for a picture it scurries around though so idk if I'm being paranoid or if it's really not doing well.
     

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  2. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    That's a severely dehydrated tarantula, you might still have time to so save it if you act quickly...get a water dish in there and place your tarantula's mouth parts over it, it is likely be too weak at this stage to find the water itself.

    Good luck.
     
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  3. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    Yes, lack of water was my first thought, too. Does it have a water dish?
     
  4. TheFox

    TheFox Arachnopeon

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    Thanks for the replies! I think dehydration was definitely the issue because when I went to put a water dish under it, it instantly snatched it from the tongs and brought it underneath it's mouth. I did have a water dish in there with it that I would usually refill once a week when I feed it but I'm guessing now that the heat is on in the apartment that it's probably drying out faster than it used to. I'll definitely be keeping an better eye on the water levels now. But after giving it a second water dish, refilling the old dish, and lightly sprinkling some water on it's webs and around the enclosure it seems to be doing a lot better. It's legs still seem a little weak but it's no longer curling and has now perched itself up by the side of the enclosure. Thanks again for the info guys, it's very appreciated!!
     
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  5. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnosquire Active Member

    That’s great news! Sometimes although the air doesn’t feel dry to us, it feels dry to our tarantulas who operate at a whole different level to their human caretakers. Store bought hygrometers are usually rubbish at detecting actual humidity levels. Just eyeball it a time or two a day and things should stay good.
     
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  6. grayzone

    grayzone Arachnoking Active Member

    I would definitely do a close examination and check to see if its leaking hemolymph from the legs. Even with access to water it will dehydrate/bleed out if the cast off leg came loose in an area the t couldnt shut off.

    If its leaking fluids, even a tiny amount, youll need to take measures to stop the "blood" flow
     
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  7. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron Active Member

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    I may be wrong, but if the tarantula shed the leg without any other apparent injury, I highly doubt the situation you describe would be an issue.

    I wasn't aware the a leg could come off in a way that the tarantula wouldn't be able to close that valve, unless maybe the coxa got damaged in some way?

    OP, if you do feel a need to use anything to stop hemolymph from leaking, DO NOT use superglue, it could cause molting issues in the future.
     
  8. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron Active Member

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    "I have shown above (see fig. 3, A-D) that in Tegenaria the coxal muscles are all inserted on to a ring of sclerites which fit into a groove in the proximal rim of the trochanter. The joint fractures between these sclerites and the trochanter, and the coxal muscles then pull the articular membrane proximally while at the same time the sclerites converge on one another (fig. 3, E) so that a comparatively small hole is left in which the blood rapidly clots and which after a day or two is sealed by a brown plate." (D. A. Parry, Spider Leg-muscles and the Autonomy Mechanism)

    So, you might see a little hemolymph leaking for a couple days, but I don't think it's anything to worry about as long as you make sure it's staying hydrated.
     
  9. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    What you describe could be the exact reason for the spiders problem: It lost a leg and some hemolymph in the process and didn't have water to replace it. Cue dehydrated spider.
     
  10. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron Active Member

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    I was hoping you would reply to this thread. What do you of the situation that @grayzone described?

    I think it's unlikely in this scenario, but I'm curious if that's possible under different circumstances. I imagine the only way that would happen is if the coxa was damaged, but you're much more knowledgeable about T's than I am so I wonder what your thoughts are on this.
     
  11. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    If it's leaking only a little fluid I'd provide lots of water and leave it the heck alone. Tarantulas do have a clotting system and only need to replace the water. If it is loosing more fluid I may use corn starch. I'm wary of superglue, though I know some people have used successfully, but if it came to the choice of watching my tarantula bleed out or using super glue, super glue it is. Still, there would need to be really significant bleeding for that.
     
  12. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Let me try to reword my question :sorry:

    It is possible for a tarantula to cast off a leg and have it come loose in an area the T can't shut off?

    I had always been under the impression that when a T voluntarily casts off a leg, it is not in any real danger of bleeding out and should be fine as long as it has access to water. I've never heard of a tarantula voluntarily casting off a leg in a way that would make it unable to close off the wound.

    The exception I can see to this would be if the coxa was damaged in the injury which caused the T to drop the leg.
     
  13. TheFox

    TheFox Arachnopeon

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    Just to clarify my situation: the spider wasn't leaking any kind of liquid and the leg definitely seems properly cast off. That being said maybe it did lose some of it's hemolymph before I saw it leading to further dehydration. Is loosing a leg a common side effect of dehydration? Just want to check to make sure it's not something else that's wrong too.

    Also, should I be worried about making the enclosure overly humid? I was surprised to see how much it had dried out over last night so I resprinkled water in there and plan to do so daily/multiple times a day at least until the T seems to be totally back to normal. I've just read a lot when I was starting the care for the T that a lot of beginners get misinformed and over-do it in regards to humidity. Is that something I should be worried about at this stage, or should I be going a little overboard just to get the Tarantula's fluid level back to normal?

    Thanks for all the info everybody!
     
  14. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Losing the leg would have been what caused the dehydration, dehydration doesn't cause them to drop legs.

    You don't want the substrate to get too wet, you don't need to provide humidity, you need to provide drinking water. Just keep the water dish full. It wouldn't hurt to spray the webbing or the sides of the enclosure every couple days to provide an additional source, just make sure you're not getting the sub too wet. These guys like it dry.
     
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  15. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    I completely agree with this. However, if there's one thing I've learned in medicine then it's that nothing is impossible. I can imagine a scenario where the valve is somehow damaged or malformed but I'd expect that to be exceedingly rare, so nothing you'd consider in a normal setting.

    Yes, you should, and very much so. This species may die within days if the enclosure is too moist and stuffy. Provide drinking water, nothing more, as @Mirandarachnid already said.
     
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  16. TheFox

    TheFox Arachnopeon

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    Okay got it, I'll just make sure it's bowls are full and maybe add a few drops to it's webs just to make sure it had access. Now just to figure out why it dropped the leg in the first place