1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Evolution of our collections?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Hoxter, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Hoxter

    Hoxter Arachnopeon Active Member

    17
    8
    3
    China
    Advertisement
    Let's talk about ours collections, how we started and the way they changed~!

    I'm still super new to the hobby, it hasn't been even one month since I got my first tarantula which was GBB and I wasn't expecting how addicting it can be. Since that one I've already gotten 3 others (A. geniculata, C. versicolor and P. irminia) and I wish I could take in even more of those cuties.

    How did it look to you guys? I can only imagine how some of those collections can be looking like after years or being in the hobby.
     
    • Dislike Dislike x 1
  2. Vanisher

    Vanisher Arachnodemon Old Timer

    Started early 2000. Within 4 years i had 150 tarantulas. Juveniles and adults. I bred many diffrent speicies during the years and got many hundred or thousand slings combined. I started to decrease my collection in 2010 and around 2016 i had ONE tarantula left. My 25 year old G porteri that was my first tarantula. My intrest in the hobby had decreased and thats the reason i sold them off. But last year i got the intrest back snd bought 8 more tarantulas, so now i have a small collection of 9 tarantulas!
     
    • Like Like x 5
  3. Arterion86

    Arterion86 Arachnopeon

    I started about 5 years ago with an A. Geniculata. I currently have ten, all of which I obtained as slings. Sadly a very beautiful OBT I had died as a juvenile, but the rest are all growing nicely!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnobaron Active Member

    I started with 5 T.'s, but before that my friend had his own collection and I learned most things from him. With the 5 T.'s I started with, it was interesting but it wasn't enough to keep me busy. At around 15 T.'s it was fun and I didn't mind more. I wasn't too busy with T.'s until I passed the 50 mark. Now at 80+ I spend about 2-3 hours a week with my T.'s. I've slowed down my collection now, since I don't have much T.s I truly want now, besides why-not-impulse buys. But I plan to lay back and watch my T.'s grows some more before buying more in the future.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. MintyWood826

    MintyWood826 Arachnobaron Active Member

    300
    349
    68
    USA
    I started out with an Avic avic. My number rose to four when I got some slings at an expo, but after an unfortunate accident it went back down to three. Now I'm going into mantids and true spiders a little, so I think I'll just be happy with what I have for a while when that shipment comes (get used to caring for those). Then, who knows where I'll stop with the hobby.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Phia

    Phia Arachnopeon Active Member

    28
    30
    18
    Texas
    Started with one wild caught mature male two years ago! Looked into tarantula keeping in depth and discovered all there was to it! I've always been a biology buff. I told myself I would never get old world species and now I have a pretty mixed collection of 44 T. Including a full grown OBT and H. Mac!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. The Seraph

    The Seraph Arachnobaron Active Member

    452
    367
    63
    USA
    Started with a B. hamorii and stayed with that for 5 years but very recently I got three new slings.
     
  8. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Like most people, my collection swelled within a year. By the end of the year, I was starting to dabble in OW species, because I saw them as the "forbidden fruit" that must be oh, so sweet. Same can be said for arboreals as a whole.

    Fast forward six years, I have roughly 150 (not exactly sure) juvies/adults and I primarily keep NW terrestrials. I absolutely got caught up in the hype of OW species and breeding - in fact, the breeding aspect very nearly ruined the hobby for me. I hated it, but at the time I thought that I was simply done with the hobby. Nope, just hate slings. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely still keep OW species, but my NW species outnumber them 5:1 easily. And as for arboreals, I own a grand total of six. I'm very happy that my collection swelled the way it did because it gave me the experience that was absolutely crucial to this hobby, but I'm happier that I found the niche I truly enjoy.

    Moral of the story? Find what you like and enjoy the hobby your way. I'd take an AF N. coloratovillosus over an AF P. metallica any day of the week. That's the beauty of our hobby - there is enough diversity that we can all enjoy our little niches.
     
    • Like x 10
    • Agree x 4
    • Lollipop x 1
    • Winner x 1
    • Beer x 1
  9. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnobaron Active Member

    Started out with an A. genic and started adding soon after, but with disdain to even consider any fossorial specimen. Now I have 30ish, a good portion of which are fossorials. A testament to how your tastes will change as you experience these critters.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. extrovertinvert

    extrovertinvert Arachnopeon Active Member

    About 19 years ago is when I first got into T's. I was working at a pet store, which gives you a unique perspective on the different types of pets. After caring for and personally experiencing the pros and cons of about every type of exotic pet, I decided that tarantulas were objectively the best pet. I brought home a rose hair first, kept it for a few months and then it molted, I literally watched it molt for hours and was hooked ever since.

    I went a little crazy after that and would pick up a nw T every time we ordered reptiles. I could get them for the wholesale price so it wasn't terribly expensive. After keeping T's for about 4 years I hit a rough patch and lost my house so the T's had to go I sold my entire collection for 300 bucks and had regretted it ever since. Last year I entered a youtube giveaway for a LP and won. Its amazing how fast the "collector mentality" comes back. I now have 4 T's, 3 Latrodectus, and a few natives.
     
  11. korlash091

    korlash091 Arachnosquire Active Member

    87
    155
    48
    MÉXICO
    I started with 1 G. rosea and a terrestrial tarantupack fom Jorge Mendoza, from there my collection started to grow slowly, now a year after i got my firts T my collection consist in 14 Ts and i hope to get more this year.
     
  12. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnosquire Active Member

    136
    105
    48
    STL
    So, it kind of goes in these steps:
    • Initial interest (1 or 2 specimens)
    • Initial growth (that species is cool, let me get one the next reptile show)
    And then you kind of continuously loop through these stages ad nauseam:
    • Exponential growth (wow, I really like that genus, particularly species x, y, and z. Let me get three of each to better the odds of a female)
    • Plateau (ok, I have the majority of what I want, let me focus on caring for them or breeding (breeding tends to circle back to exponential growth really quick))
    • Decline (collection becomes overwhelming, interest wanes, or older specimens start to die off)
    Personally, I'm in the exponential growth phase at the moment and my interests have always been arboreals and some select fossorials, mostly OW.

    Thanks,
    --Matt
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  13. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince Active Member

    1,238
    1,423
    203
    Texas
    Started with one T, got a mantis, tailless whip scorpion and some more Ts. Shortly after that I got a centipede, then more Ts, then a bunch of true spiders and centipedes. My collection is pretty evenly balanced between true spiders and tarantulas, with some centipedes sprinkled in and I try to always have a few mantis.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    The more time goes by the more I own.
     
  15. draconisj4

    draconisj4 Arachnoknight

    I initially did not start with Ts because I didn't want anything that needed live food as the closest place that sells feeders is 35 miles away so I decided on desert beetles. I ended up with more larvae than I could raise so I thought " Hey, here's some live food!" I ordered a T and a scorpion about 2 years ago. One thing led to another and now I have 44 Ts, a funnel web, 2 scorpions, a centipede, harvestmen and a host of other inverts. I think my collection is pretty much complete now, the only inverts I'd really like to add are a vinegaroon and some whipspiders.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    1.5 Years in the hobby 22 inverts, more than enough for me.
    Mostly NW Terrestrials mainly Brachypelma, favourite part of the hobby is watching slings grow.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnomancer Arachnosupporter

    626
    2,321
    533
    Maryland
    Got a 1/4 inch G. pulchripes in 2013. Got a 3/4 inch G. pulchra about a month later. Fast forward to early 2017. Those slings had become young adults, and I decided that I really like having tarantulas around, so I started buying more every few months. Slowed down in 2018, as I moved from an apartment into a house after my dad passed away. Got shelving that was the ideal size for the acrylic containers I use, and set everything up in the dining room. The count is currently 43, but there are a handful more that I'm interested in. I don't think I'll go much over 50 at any point.

    [​IMG]
     
    • Love Love x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  18. The Seraph

    The Seraph Arachnobaron Active Member

    452
    367
    63
    USA
    So neat! It looks so much better than my disorganized mess.
     
  19. Hoxter

    Hoxter Arachnopeon Active Member

    17
    8
    3
    China
    I really love how you organized it. Did you make those enclosures on your own? Locking mechanism looks interesting, how does it work actually? I might be making some of my own in near future.
     
  20. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnomancer Arachnosupporter

    626
    2,321
    533
    Maryland
    The enclosures are acrylic shoeboxes and sweater boxes. I drilled holes for ventilation. The locking mechanism isn't really that at all, it's gaffer's tape. Strong, leaves no residue, and can be peeled back and re-stuck hundreds of times before it starts to lose holding power. It's expensive stuff at $20-25 per roll, but it's worth it.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1