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Dyskinetic syndrome (dks)

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Stan Schultz, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

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    Don’t lots of cities spray pesticides to keep mosquitoes populations down ?
     
  2. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

    Yes.
     
  3. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    Do air conditioning units filter this stuff out? I’d imagine someone who keeps windows open could possibly get some pesticides in there house. Dono if it would be enough to cause issues, I’ve noticed less & less wild inverts & moths in my local area. Each year seems like pesticides chip at native species to the city.
    I’ve not had any dks issues in a few years now .
    I’m Thinking flea killing powder, or the spray might have lingered in air , longer then expected. Last dks was p Metallica possibly due to this . Probably 3 years ago or more, can’t remember exact date.
    Hope we can identify the cause Of dks.
     
  4. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

    I guess it would depend on what they are spraying and what kind of filters it uses.

    Look up the mosquito abatement schedule in your area so that you can take appropriate precautions. Find out what they are spraying, how, and when. (Google the chemical name to find out how long it lingers in the air.)

    There may be a process for beekeepers to register. I registered this year so that I would get notifications on nights when they planned to spray from trucks. (I explained that even though I don't keep bees, I keep pet tarantulas, which, like other invertebrates, are potentially susceptible to insecticides.)

    Here, the routine spraying involves driving around in trucks and spraying permethrin. (It targets adult mosquitoes, but it doesn't seem to be very effective here. However, I don't think it has been great for the population of large orbweavers.)

    The only precautions I have been taking for routine spraying are to turn off the vent fans (that vent outside air inside) during the nights of the spraying. (It is just too hot and humid to forego air conditioning.) I have not noticed any symptoms with my tarantulas or my feeder insects; everyone seems healthy.

    Last August, during the Zika panic, a plane flew over and carpet-bombed our entire county with naled. They forgot to notify the registered beekeepers. Millions of domestic and wild bees were killed; many beekeepers were wiped out. Anecdotally, it seemed to devastate our local spider population as well.

    The only announcement was posted on the town's Facebook page. It was posted on a Friday afternoon after business hours, so no one was available to respond to questions. We only found out because my husband happened to log in that day. I didn't have much notice, so I sealed each of my tarantula enclosures in large plastic bags with their own air supply (from our air compressor) and left them in the bags for 36 hours. Everyone was fine.


    I would avoid flea powder or topical flea/tick treatments if you have pet invertebrates. If you have dogs or cats, they make oral flea medicine that might be a safer option for your pet invertebrates.
     
    • Sad Sad x 1
  5. ediblepain

    ediblepain Arachnosquire

    m balfouri sling DKS like symptoms. More info in video description.
     
    • Sad Sad x 3
  6. laservet

    laservet Arachnopeon

    FWIW, I'm an exotic animal veterinarian and I asked about this in a forum for exotic animal veterinary specialists (including zoo vets, researchers, along with practitioners) and they said with the data available so far it is not recognized as a syndrome, suspect husbandry issues.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. ediblepain

    ediblepain Arachnosquire

    Only one balfouri in my communal showed any issues. It was humanly euthanized. The other balfouri (sack mates) are all healthy.