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Dwarf Tarantulas

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Lamia, Jul 10, 2018 at 3:13 PM.

  1. Lamia

    Lamia Arachnopeon

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    Looking for more information where I can buy dwarf tarantulas. My daughter really wants a Euathlus sp red or E. parvulus.. ok.. I am having zero luck on them. :(

    Is there another dwarf type species that would be good for a beginner?
    We are located in the USA.

    Thanks
     
  2. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Does it need to be a dwarf? There are plenty of tarantulas that only grow to about 5 or 6 inches that make great beginners but the few dwarfs i can think of (i am by no means an expert on them) all have a reputation of being VERY fast and prone to bolting out of enclosures.
     
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  3. Lamia

    Lamia Arachnopeon

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    My daughter is so picky (she gets that from me :shame:). She wants a smaller size. She is not wanting a 6-7 inch tarantula, and really something more than just a 'brown' spider. I am thinking ease of care, humidity requirements, etc in the long run.

    I am open to all suggestions!
     
  4. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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  5. boina

    boina Arachnoprince Arachnosupporter

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    Most Euathlus species don't get that big. If you are open for an 4" tarantula there's E. condorito, for example. Then there is Phrixotrichus scrofa, also about 4" and Thrixopelma cyaneolum at that size. Among the Brachypelmas B. verdezi is one of the smallest - and one of the more active ones. All very nice spiders, good for children, too (how old is your daughter?) - and rather difficult to find.

    @Theneil is right, most dwarfs are extremely fast and skittish.

    They are bright and pretty - but they burrow and you'll never see them. Also fast.
     
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  6. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Well there are plenty that aren't just brown. LOL. The general "Beginner" species are going to be the New world terrestrials. Most often recomended are probably the Brachypelma and Grammosola genera, however those average about 5 inches as adults i think, maybe a bit bigger.

    For dwarfs the only ones that come to mind are:

    H. sp columbia Large (Often reccomended against due to speed and tendancy to run out of enclosure)

    H. sp Columbia Small (a lot less common, VERY small, Not sure on attitude.)

    K. brunipes (Mine have all been very easygoing but they are still only maybe .25-.375" DLS)

    and D. diamantinensis which i think is supposed to be Even worse about bolting out of enclosures than the columbia large)

    Sorry i can't be much more help.

    Of the above, the H. sp columbia Large (AKA Pumkin patch) is probably the best bet with propper research and caution. Also worth a note, it is Fossorial (meaning it will live in a burrow) so it will likely not be visible most of the time if it is housed properly.
     
  7. boina

    boina Arachnoprince Arachnosupporter

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    No, they are not fossorials - mine have never burrowed at all. They just web up everything is sight. And, yeah, they are good if you enjoy searching for a small spider all over your home :shifty:. They bolt. They don't run towards their hide, they just run. I once had the 'pleasure' of carefully extricating my male from the folds of my couch blanket - after a panicked search.
     
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  8. Lamia

    Lamia Arachnopeon

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    She is 16. so not really a 'child'.
     
  9. boina

    boina Arachnoprince Arachnosupporter

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    I thought of another one: Plesiopelma sp. Bolivia, a true dwarf. I always wanted to recommend that one, it's one of my absolute favorites - and incredibly rare :hilarious:.
     
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  10. Lamia

    Lamia Arachnopeon

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    incredibly rare.... ugh!

    looks like her and I are going to do a lot of googling tomorrow about all these different kinds.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 15, 2018 at 1:42 AM
  11. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    This is the species you should be looking for...P. scrofa.
     
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  12. Lamia

    Lamia Arachnopeon

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    ok.. that would freak me the heck out!

    was up all night at 3am tearing apart a 55 gal fish tank because I could not find a betta that was in there.. i found him.. alive and hiding. :/

    Could not imaging trying to find a spider in the folds of the couch...
     
  13. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    This locality can be found for sale. PM me I'll give you the name of a dealer.

    There is no other T w/such a great disposition, other than E sp Yellow and T. cyaneolum around their size AND disposition. The latter is slightly larger but very, very rare in the hobby, and much more money.

    I have many slings of both large and small, all burrowed even into juvi stage, but not as adults.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2018 at 8:47 PM
  14. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Mine (Large) has always made a burrow too. (only an inch-ish right now.) So i guess they are just terrestrial as adults...?
     
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  15. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoprince Active Member

    Dwarf Ts are something I don’t have , I ran out of money when I was going to get a few. If you can’t find them get a normal or average sized T. Really nothing is massive except Goliath , my vote is gbb or C elegans. Gbb isn’t too big or bulky. Mine are around 4.5” or so

    I vote for this , or g rosea they grow slow enough and don’t get too big.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2018 at 10:05 PM
  16. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I don't think such conclusions can be made from captivity with a small n. Captivity can induce unnatural behavior in many animals.
     
  17. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Good point.
     
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  18. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    We have a saying in science " 2 pts make a line", but the predictive value of 2 pts is not the greatest. ;)
     
  19. Sorry I can’t help too much but I was able to get 2 euathlus parvulus in December and both of them after they molted have become VERY skittish. Obviously 7 months with only 2 isn’t really enough to say if they’re calm or skittish.
    I’ve also been looking for a euathlus sp red for about 3 years now...no luck.

    I know you wanted something smaller but a B.albo(curly hair) is a good choice. Mine have a really nice pinkish colour to them.
     
  20. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Arachno HoneyBadger Arachnosupporter

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    It’s already taking too long for my slings to grow, a dwarf would just be irritating....
     
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