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Does anyone have registered at what instar a species become mature?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Gekkotan, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. Gekkotan

    Gekkotan Arachnosquire

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    It would be good a database for males and females in diferent species...
     
  2. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    They do not all mature at the same rate.
     
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  3. Sarkhan42

    Sarkhan42 Arachnobaron Active Member

    Unfortunately there’s no solid answer for you, as CB said even sacmates can mature at different rates (something I’m hoping to perform a study on next year perhaps, stay tuned for more detailed variation numbers)
     
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  4. AphonopelmaTX

    AphonopelmaTX Moderator Staff Member

    The only species I could find this information for is Theraphosa blondi. Marshall and Uetz (1993) reports males mature at the 9th instar and females at the 10th.

    Marshall, S. D., & Uetz, G. W. (1993). The growth and maturation of a giant spider: Theraphosa leblondi (Latreille, 1804)(Araneae, Theraphosidae). Revue arachnologique, 10(5), 93-103.

    @cold blood @Sarkhan42
    The question is regarding the number of molts until maturity and not how fast they mature. In spiders, the number of instars until a species reaches sexually maturity is a constant where-as how fast they reach that ultimate instar is variable.
     
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  5. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    I did not know that...that actually surprises me quite a bit.
     
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  6. Sarkhan42

    Sarkhan42 Arachnobaron Active Member

    I read the question in passing, I misunderstood entirely. Thanks for pointing that out and clarifying :)
     
  7. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Arachnoknight Active Member

    So the same as scorpions, I had wondered about that seeing that females keep moulting throughout their lives.
    It would be a good idea to compile a list, if the data can be found.
     
  8. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    For the female its molts to maturity...all molts afterward are post maturity molts.
     
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  9. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Arachnoknight Active Member

    I knew there were post maturity moults, but it would be interesting to see if moult number 'x' is always the moult that they are mature within a species, and if it varies species to species.
    I had read info from Steve Nunn about how in some Australian species the male siblings will mature in waves with some maturing a couple years after the first ones. I guess it would still be the same number of moults. The early maturing are mature at a smaller size, but I guess they just don't put on as much size each moult rather than becoming mature after fewer moults. It's all very interesting.
     
  10. Gekkotan

    Gekkotan Arachnosquire

    Exactly. Thanks for clarificate this
    Yes, this is what I was planning to find out. Maybe there is someone with these notes...
     
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  11. jaycied

    jaycied Arachnoknight Active Member

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    This is a really interesting concept. It would be neat to track, though I can see that being difficult, especially with fossorial sp. Even if you keep a sling from egg laying through maturity, it can be hard to tell when molts occur, and difficult to sex the molts if you have a molt muncher.
     
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  12. boina

    boina Arachnoprince Arachnosupporter

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    According to the German breeder Benjamin Weber, who has been breeding all kinds of Pamphobeteus and Xenesthis for years, these genera mature at 10th instar, male and female alike.
     
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  13. AphonopelmaTX

    AphonopelmaTX Moderator Staff Member

    I did a bit more reading and found that some tarantulas mature in the same number of instars (9-10) as the larger Araneomorphae. Also, if I would have read through the Marshall and Uetz paper I referenced instead of going the lazy route of reading the abstract, I could have typed more data. Here are some additional tarantula species with the instar they mature at:

    Theraphosa blondi (captive reared individuals from French Guiana lineage): 9-10 instars in ~3 years
    Aphonopelma hentzi from Arkansas: 16-17 instars in ~10 years
    Avicularia avicularia from Trinidad: 14-15 instars in ~3 years
    Psalmopoeus sp. (species not specified; captive reared individuals from Venezuela and Trinidad): 9-10 instars in ~2 years
     
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  14. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Arachnoknight Active Member

    So we're already seeing a difference from genus to genus, helpful information already. If people keep looking a comprehensive list might be possible.
    And....You gotta read past the abstract! Naughty! Lol :)
     
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