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Day & Night Cycle

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by grimmjowls, May 20, 2016.

  1. bryverine

    bryverine Arachnoangel

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    I keep my tarantulas in a closet with a heater/humidifier.

    I've noticed that one tarantula in particular (H. mac) was only out around 11:00pm-5:00am even though I offer no day/night cycle.

    My other tarantulas don't seem to care. Maybe I'll have to start dropping the temps at night though...
     
  2. High Lord Dee

    High Lord Dee Arachnosquire

    And I respectfully disagree with your disagreement. :pompous:;). All animals trigger behavior based on the light/dark argument.
     
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  3. I think you need to reword that to most, as there are species of animals that live in almost complete darkness all of their lives. Particularly species that live at the bottom of the ocean or deep inside caves where measurable light levels are negligible.
     
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  4. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    Yup...go virtually anywhere where there is never light penetration and you still find life...on land, arachnids almost always inhabit these types of places in high numbers.


    My ts haven't had light for 8 years...yet everyone is healthy, grows at a good clip and I have 4 different specimens currently sitting on sacs.
     
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  5. Haksilence

    Haksilence Bad At Titles Arachnosupporter

    i always look at things naturalisticly i try to give my specimens as close to the wild as i can give them. so i leave the shades up during the day to give a regulated schedule.

    on another note that may have been visited, not sure since i didnt read ever comment (TLDR) ive heard of some people using lighting when breeding certain species to simulate the climate ques they would normally have in the wild, IE slightly longer daylight hours during the summer ect. idk how much validity there is in this, but thought it worth mentioning
     
  6. High Lord Dee

    High Lord Dee Arachnosquire

    Covered that earlier in the thread. Thanks.
     
  7. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    My room, where i keep (and always kept) my T's & inverts, is always in the "dark" mode, but Jesus Christ, ain't a vampire.

    Starting from the very 'Captain Obvious' point that no enclosure is near, or exposed to light (ah ah, go figure) i love to let the gentle light of the day "IN", filtered of course by the window curtain, during Day-Time (mostly from dawn, prior work).

    Same for the night. My T's aren't bothered at all. My previous T's weren't. Active during the day as well.
    Agree, 100%, that it's NOT necessary, but wouldn't harm as well.

    Seriously, do we really think that, that P.cambridgei living in the wild of that beauty Trinidad tree estate on the beach, doesn't notice the gentle "touch" of light?
     
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  8. Formerphobe

    Formerphobe Arachnoking Arachnosupporter

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    My Ts do not get direct sunlight, but they do experience light and dark. And I've found a surprising array of species "basking" in the daylight at the opening to their burrows.
     
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  9. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Same here, man.
     
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  10. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member


    I agree.

    But look at fossorials...they may live their whole lives and never see light if they can help it...underground all the time except for after dark.

    Obviously there's a lot of other species where this isn't the case, so your point certainly isn't lost;).
     
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  11. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Very true. Except the Goddess, she's the Queen, the light bringer. Praise the Sun :-s
     
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  12. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    :banghead::banghead:
     
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  13. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Eh eh :)

     
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  14. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    This very behavior indicates the animal has a circadian rhythm.
     
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  15. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    But if the animal doesn't see light, it in its self isn't a requirement for survival...all it does is force that rhythm.
     
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  16. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince

    If an organism has functioning eyes it hasn't evolved to live in complete darkness and IMO should be given a photo period..

    Some could even argue that we should offer nocturnal inverts,reptiles and some mammals/marsupials soft illumination at night to simulate the dim light of the moon for there psychological well being..
    The nitty gritty is that these creatures( us included) experience not one but two photoperiods everyday...

    I understand many Tarantulas spend 90+ percent of there time in there burrows but many come to the mouth of there burrow everynight or out completly wether to hunt or just to explore..

    Is it required no not really but what harm does it do? And why shouldn't most of us advocate for it as a standard husbandry practice? I understand if you can't for short periods of time but for most of us not living in caves giving your Ts a photo period is most likely a good idea...
     
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  17. Formerphobe

    Formerphobe Arachnoking Arachnosupporter

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    Not so. Ive caught most of my fossorials "basking" at their burrow openings in the daylight. Some of the best photos I got of my H lividum were taken in daylight. A enzendami can be seen most afternoons, as can most of my Chilobrachys (sp Black Satan is the exception). P murinus, E murinus, C marshalli, M balfouri all sit in burrow openings frequently during the day. They do not live in a world without light.
     
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  18. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I've noticed that as well especially with my female E.murinus, "sitting" at her burrow entrance.
     
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  19. Sana

    Sana Arachnoprince

    I keep my tarantulas in my bedroom along with myself and any number of plants. My plants and I require daylight. I'm a sun worshiper. I bask like a cat. I don't stick my tarantulas in direct sunlight, but the curtains are open during the day and closed at night so they do experience the daily cycle. This habit of mine also contributes to seasonal cues for my tarantulas as they experience the longer hours of daylight during the summer and shorter hours during winter. Additionally, we don't use a/c in our house so the tarantulas experience the increased temperature of summer and the decrease of winter. It's probably still warmer in the house during the winter then some temperate species would experience during a winter night in their natural environment but I suspect that our indoor winter temps probably reasonably reflect what would be found naturally in the tropical areas. If I had to go through ten types of annoyance to run artificial lighting and whatnot to create this cycle I don't think that I would do so unless it was proven necessary but as long as daily life for my tarantulas isn't harming them when it reflects my daily rhythm I'm going with it.
     
  20. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    What do you mean by the above? What do you mean by survival, if you mean whether it will live or die, that's a black/white definition.