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Critiques Wanted (Macro)

Discussion in 'Through the Lens' started by EulersK, Oct 1, 2016.

  1. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

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    You don't have to go all in at the start. It's like most hobbies you don't need the best of everything to get good photos.

    If you are planning on getting into the photography as a hobby then I'd recommend at least starting out with a DSLR. This will give you a base to grow from.

    I started out with a Canon Digital Rebel xti when I switched over to digital. I bought the camera body and an off brand lens for the type of photos I wanted to take. Over the years I have added lenses to my kit when I needed them. I've long since traded the camera body for a much nicer 5D that uses the same lenses.

    Most of my light kits have come from cragslist as it seems there are always someone getting rid of them for cheap. Same for tripods and other things.

    Of course, I've got really good photos with my phone and with point & shoots. So it just depends on how much your into photography and if it's worth the extra cash.
     
  2. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoengineer Arachnosupporter

    Great article! I just got through reading that as well as ISO and shutter speed. This is a lot to take in, I'll tell you. Very little of it is intuitive.

    I'm going to start frequenting Craigslist for a second hand DSLR :p
     
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  3. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

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    It is but you don't have to know it all (I don't) to have fun and get great shots. Partal modes can be nice when you know which setting you want to adjust and you just let the camera handle the rest. For instance aperture mode lets you set the aperture and the camera adjusts the ISO and shutter speed to compensate. That way you don't have to set everything yourself but still get the setting you want.

    This is how it starts right here. :D
     
  4. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoengineer Arachnosupporter

    Well, no, this is how it starts. I have the ability to get a Nikon D3300 for about half of MSRP through my job. That's still a chunk of change, though. From what I'm reading it's a great beginner DSLR, and the reviews I'm reading are complaining about things I don't think will matter to me. But some of the verbiage they used raised a question.

    Are lenses not all universal? That is, what fits on one camera won't fit on another? What a pain.
     
  5. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

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    Nice, does that come with a lens kit?

    Lenses have mounting connectors so you have to buy the one for your camera Canon and Nikon are pretty good about keeping most of their lenses are compatible with most of their bodies. My Canon will take all lenses with the Canon EF lens mount which is a big chunk of the lenses they sale. You can't put Nikon glass on a Canon though and each have lenses that wont fit on some of their cameras so keep an eye out for that. If in the future you go to upgrade your camera body and want to use your old lenses just make sure it has the same mount.
     
  6. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoengineer Arachnosupporter

    Ugh, what a pain. Oh well.

    I've got two options. For $200, I get the body and a AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Zoom Lens. For double the price, I get the same thing plus an AF-P DX NIKKOR 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3G.

    From what @advan said, it doesn't seem like that extra lens would be worth it for my goal. The aperture has a narrow range of values, which doesn't give me much room to play with. Seems like I should save the money and save up for a proper macro lense.
     
  7. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoengineer Arachnosupporter

    Alright, I'm biting the bullet. After a few hours of reading, I think this is what I'm going for:
    • Nikon D3300 with included 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Zoom Lens, refurbished ($200)
    • Tokina AT-X 100mm f/2.8 PRO D Macro Lens ($250)
    I kept it just a hair over my $400 budget, and I got some killer deals in the process. Sure, the camera is refurbished, but I'm fine with that. That lens has some great reviews, and I think it'll be more than enough to get me started.

    Thank you @Trenor, @advan, and @Haemus for the help! There's no way I would have been able to navigate this maze of information without you guys.
     
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  8. Haemus

    Haemus Arachnosquire

    @EulersK Congrats, and welcome to the hobby! Can't wait to see some pics with the new gear :)
     
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  9. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    Boo Nikon ;) Just kidding, Nikon still has some excellent lenses and bodies, but I'm a Canon fan personally. One thing to keep in mind with your new kit is that it's going to take a lot of futzing around to get used to it and get the shots you really want. It might get a bit frustrating after a point. When I got my Canon Rebel T3, it took several days of me messing around with all the settings and trying to figure out proper lighting before I was able to get any halfway decent shots, and even then I wasn't all that happy with them. I kept messing around though and tried photographing things other than my spiders and after a point I started getting much nicer shots. I just finished doing a full upgrade of my gear (you can get great deals on secondhand gear here and here), so now I'm able to take great shots, some of which I'm actually really happy with and am contemplating printing and framing. BUT I know I wouldn't have been able to get to this point without spending a couple years learning and practicing and taking lots and lots of shots. Fancy gear certainly helps with shots, but nothing can beat good ol' practice. Plus it's kind of fun going back and seeing the shots you took when you first started as opposed to after you've had the kit for a few weeks/months/years.

    You got a great deal with that gear and from some of the shots I've seen through that Tokina you'll be having lots of fun! Can't wait to see the shots you get! :)
     
  10. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoengineer Arachnosupporter

    Thanks for those links, I'll keep them bookmarked. This largely dried out my hobby budget, but I know I'm missing a few crucial pieces of hardware. I like that the camera is a beginner level that gives me a bit of room to grow. I don't really see needing anything else any time soon, you know? I'm actually really looking forward to the learning process. Like you said, I love to see the progression over time. I'm a musician, so I know very well how long skills can take to develop!
     
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  11. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    Agreed, that set up will definitely last you for a while :) Have fun with your set up and enjoy learning how to use some great equipment!
     
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