1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Considering my first tarantula

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Mimstrel, Apr 17, 2019.

  1. Mimstrel

    Mimstrel Arachnopeon

    0
    2
    2
    USA
    Advertisement
    I've been thinking for a while about getting a tarantula. I like that they are pretty low maintenance, unique pets, and quite beautiful; I've recently ventured into invertebrate pets in the form of mantids, and have been quite pleased.

    A little background on me: I currently have a dog, a Senegal parrot, two Society finches, three Kenyan sand boas, a corn snake, two mourning geckos, three fish (two bettas and a killifish, all getting quite old), a ghost mantis, and a spiny flower mantis. I also have volunteered or interned with several zoological institutions, primarily with birds and mammals, but with a few herps and inverts.

    As it will be exclusively a display animal, it is important to me that my first T be something I find especially beautiful. As such, I'm considering an Avicularia or Caribena (though C. versicolor gets a little bigger than I ideally want to venture). They are beautiful Ts and while they're not the most commonly recommended species for beginners, they do seem to be cautiously kept on the list.

    There's a couple of species of Euathlus (and/or Homoeomma? Euathlus parvulus and H. orellanai are possibilities, for example) that I think I would be interested in as well, but they don't seem to be commonly available currently so I suspect that if I do find one, it would be expensive.

    Are there any smallish species of Avicularia that would be better or worse for a beginner?

    (side note: I likely will wait until at least October/Tinley Park to purchase unless I find a really great deal)
     
  2. ChaosSphere

    ChaosSphere Arachnopeon

    Avicularia, Caribena and any other of the ex-avics are more or less easy to keep: they had a bad reputation back in the day as frail spiders, but with plenty of ventilation there is no issue.
    So you can use them as a beginners species without problems.

    Why does size concern you, if I may ask?

    Another spider you could take a look at would be the Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (beautiful, heavy webber, sits out in the open often).
    Or maybe some of the NW dwarfs (though they might be more reclusive and shy).
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Teal

    Teal Arachnoemperor Old Timer

    I second this recommendation for a great display spider. Their webbing is awesome and the spiders themselves are lovely! Avics tend to just make a web tube at the top, if at all, or hide out in a cork bark tube. But if you want an Avic/Avic adjacent species, go for it! Just read all the posts on here regarding *proper* husbandry. C. versi aren't huge spiders... maybe you have them confused with another species?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. ChaosSphere

    ChaosSphere Arachnopeon

    Anyway, it mostly depends on what you want: aborreal or terrestrial.
    Aborreals tends to have the colours and ease of care, but you see Them less often than terrestrials whose care is often extremely easy and who will stay out all the time.
     
  5. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    A. minatrix are the smallest of the genus (they max out at around 3") but they're very fast/skittish so not really great for beginners, mine was also my most reclusive Avic.

    I don't think they get much bigger than 5" IIRC (my adult female is 4.75"), if around the 4" mark is where you draw the line then you're going to have a hard time finding beginner species, a lot of dwarf species are generally considered intermediate species either due to their speed/skittishness or slightly narrower tolerance for husbandry errors.

    N. incei and D. diamantinensis are both awesome species that don't exceed 4" but they're very fast/skittish, N. incei also need to be kept on slightly moist sub.


    Homoeomma chilensis/orellanai or Thrixopelma cyaneolum would be ideal but they're difficult to acquire (especially the latter), Phrixotrichus scrofa would be another one to look into but they're also difficult to get a hold of.


    If the OP thinks C. versicolor is a bit on the large side then a GBB will be as well seeing as they get slightly bigger
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  6. Teal

    Teal Arachnoemperor Old Timer

    The adult female GBBs I have seen were 4-5". They get larger than that?
     
  7. VanessaS

    VanessaS Grammostola Groupie Arachnosupporter

    I have two adult females and both their exuvia measure 5.5" DLS. Whereas my Caribena versicolor adult female is only 4.5".
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    Supposedly 5"-6", pretty sure my girl's over 5" now, the moult was only a smidgen under 5"

    Edit: she's exactly 5".
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Mimstrel

    Mimstrel Arachnopeon

    0
    2
    2
    USA
    For on thing, because I simply tend to be drawn towards smaller creatures; I find them cute. Secondly, because larger species require larger enclosures, and space tends to be at a premium in my house. I would rather select a smaller animal and have the option to give it extra space (my understanding is that sometimes with inverts, depending on the species, this may not be as advantageous as it is with vertebrates), rather than get a larger animal that I can only provide the minimum space requirements once it reaches full size. Or, if the animal is one for which there is no advantage to providing it with extra space, I might then have space for another small pet if I decide to go that route.

    I found a few references stating that they would get 6 inches or maybe a bit bigger; 5" is really the top size I'd hope for. Just finishing up lunch and heading back to work or I'd look up and share where I found those measurements.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    versicolor are a fairly small arboreal...most top about 5".

    Even the largest ts dont require very large enclisures....large arboreals would be an exception. Just about any large tetrestrial can be in a 10 gal or a tub thats even shorter.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. CommanderBacon

    CommanderBacon Arachnosquire

    I second D. diamantinensis. Mine is an awesome little guy. Big spider energy in a small, beautiful package. If you don't want a GBB because of the size, a D. diamantinensis will be a good alternative. They web a lot, have a good feeding response, and are really gorgeous little guys. Mine is tiny but is out often enough. I handled it during a rehousing and it was chill, but tbh I wouldn't expect that all the time from it. He's fairly fast when he wants to be and skittish at times.

    I also like small or dwarf species. What I have found that they are generally all a little bit skittish, my only exception being my Euathlus condorito, which is always out and a little dopey.

    I love my A. minatrix, but it is extremely fast. I had read about it and was prepared for it, but it still managed to escape during my first rehousing and ended up on my lap. I don't recommend it for a first spider.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1