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Cleaning after parasites?

Discussion in 'Not So Spineless Wonders' started by PeterPann, Apr 10, 2019.

  1. PeterPann

    PeterPann Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Hey!!

    Sooo amazing news.. I have a new baby. His name is Sharmouta. I'm concerned about the enclosure though. I washed everything down with soap and water, then wiped everything down with a clorox wipe because I was paranoid about my previous gecko and his parasites he had.

    Did I do enough or do I need to soak the enclosure in a bleach solution? Because I'm going to be really upset if this one gets sick as well. I didn't put any of the old things back in the enclosure except for the plastic ivy that I did the same process with to clean it.

    How should I go about cleaning his tank so he doesn't get hurt from any chemicals?
     
  2. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Arachnopeon Active Member

    What parasites did the previous one have, and what type of gecko are we talking about?
    Has he been quarantined somewhere you can watch to make sure he doesn't have parasites?
     
  3. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    This is quite important. 'Parasites' covers a galaxy of invasive organisms with a vast number of stages in their life cycles. From is present or isn't to eggs to stages of larvae on out, each often handled quite differently. The only known great equalizers of all is/was methyl bromide or a thorough prolonged dosing of UV.
     
  4. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Arachnopeon Active Member

    I dunno, hydrochloric acid would probably be a pretty good equalizer, too, in high enough concentrations.

    (This is not a legitimate suggestion, please do not use hydrochloric acid for cleaning. Unless you're cleaning up after a zombie apocalypse or something.)
     
  5. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    I was working along the lines of what wouldn't leave scars on the landscape and psyche. The problem with nearly all chemicals when used as biocides is they aren't wet. Big clunky molecules that bounce off of things instead of chemically reacting with them. Bromomethane, CH3Br, is a gas toxic to everything it comes into any contact with, animal or vegetable, but unfortunately also to the planet as it releases bromine which is a magnitude greater than chlorine compounds in contributing to ozone depletion. And of course, UV is hostile to everything and without ozone along with other gasses would turn the planet into a bleached out crispy critter in short order.
     
  6. PeterPann

    PeterPann Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Hey everyone! Sorry, I had a lot going on this week with car troubles and getting it fixed. Two flats and one spare = a bad time.

    Its another Tokay... only about a few months old. He was captive bred. My first gecko had nematodes, flagellates, coccidia, and pinworms before he passed.
    He's my only gecko, so he isn't with anyone else--so technically

    Throughout the week though, Sharmouta (new gecko) has been eating... seems to be active. Loves hiding near the ceramic heat lamp. Barks if I accidentally startle him... He seems to be functioning very well.
     
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