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Breakdown of chilobrachys species

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by arachnoherp, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. arachnoherp

    arachnoherp Arachnosquire

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    Hello, ive been following this hobby for awhile but then came to a stop when i was moving around alot and last thing i remember was everyone wanted the different poecies and it was all about them but i came back and it seems like the most popular genus is suddenly chilobrachys species, can someone give me an idea about the guys like, why are they so popular, basic info on them, personality, your experiences with them and what you like about them. Sorry if this seems to be a strange question just up until i came back ive never heard of this these and now everyone and there mom has them lol.
     
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  2. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    Chilobrachys are probably becoming more popular due to the many new colorful species available. Although some are vastly overpriced IMO. (Sp. Electric blue)

    They are overall beautiful spiders with awesome personalities. They have moderately fast growth rates as well. Mine have always been very active and stay out in the open a lot. These spiders are heavy webbers and have an excellent feeding response. What's not to love?
     

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  3. arachnoherp

    arachnoherp Arachnosquire

    They are pretty nice! Are they pretty defensive? Whats venom like?
     
  4. efmp1987

    efmp1987 Arachnosquire


    What do you think of them? Are they more of the "flash" species (the color only becomes visible when subjected to the camera flash) or the truly vibrant under any light (e.g. GBB)?
     
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  5. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I haven't noticed much popularity. Alot of new sepvies i haven't seen befote, but that's about it.

    I only raised fimbriatus, my specimen is about 3" now. Really good eater, almost scary good. Like don't leave the lid off they'll come out good.
    Burrowers, but also web everything.

    Alot of them are very fairly priced too. Average sling price for the majority of species is aroubd 30 dollars.

    I agree with Euler's. I don't buy Hysterocrates for their black/grey/brown colors, I buy them for their burrows, size, and feeding response. Tarantulas are a lot more than looks.
     
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  6. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Chilobrachys is hands down my favorite genus. Most have fairly boring colors to be honest, with the common exception being C. fimbriatus. But you don't get this genus for the colors, you get them for the interesting webbing, amazing feeding responses, fast growing, and fierce attitude. If any tarantula can be considered aggressive, it would be a Chilobrachys. Adult females will actively chase down intruders, going as far as to chase you out of the enclosure. Definitely a genus to always have a catch cup nearby.
     
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  7. efmp1987

    efmp1987 Arachnosquire


    Are they the type that will render a person as incapable of caring for a living thing should one die under his or her care (and thus should not bother to reproduce to prevent the spread of his or her genes)??????
     
  8. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Juveniles and adults are quite hardy. But their young slings (I'm talking very young, 3i or smaller) are stupidly fragile. In general, once they break the 1" mark you're in the clear. They all prefer slightly humid enclosures, but all can survive on bone dry. That's how durable they are.

    Note that you shouldn't keep them bone dry, I'm just making a point.
     
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  9. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnoreaper Arachnosupporter

    They're very quickly becoming cheaper (here at least anyway) slings used to cost around the same as T. blondi slings (about £90) but they've at least halved in price since then.
     
  10. Nonnack

    Nonnack Arachnosquire

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    I wouldn't call them most popular genus, fimbriatus is quite popular but the rest isn't too much imo. I can't tell much about Chilobrachys because i have only one C. Kaeng Krachan young female (but raised it from 1I sling). I got it as freebie and first I wasn't really excited about it. But now I think its one of my most interesting spiders, and it made me buy some more Asian burrowers:)
    It doesn't have any interesting colors, unless you shine bright light on it, but have a nice shape of body. And I love the way it hunts, fast and furious;) its like in split of second pray is just grabbed and dragged underground. Also its tunnels and web system is great. Here are some pictures:)

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    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
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  11. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    Oh great. Now I'm worried. I got a 2i sling (C. fimbriatus) as a freebie a few weeks ago...
     
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  12. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Their main issue is humidity, as you can imagine. They die in stuffy enclosures and seem to require much more ventilation than other slings (ironic for a burrowing species). But at the same time, it has to be kept perpetually humid. They'll literally die over night in a dry-ish enclosure. You've kept snakes, yes? If you've got an incubator, I'd suggest using it.

    ... but something tells me you'll do just fine with it ;)

    EDIT: Remember, I live in one of the driest deserts in North America. My definition of dry is quite different from yours, I'm sure.
     
  13. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    Ok, I think the humidity is fine - I live in an area of perpetual rain, after all :grumpy: and nothing ever dries out, even if I want it to :sour: - but I'm running to make more ventilation holes.

    Thanks for the tip - and for the compliment ;)
     
  14. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    Mine are more skittish then defensive and are quick to retreat rather then stand their ground. They do have a cazy feeding response though.

    Their venom is definitely pretty potent as they are an OW species. I haven't read the bite reports on the genus so I couldn't tell you exactly how bad they are.
     
  15. efmp1987

    efmp1987 Arachnosquire

    How is Chilobrachys different from Orphnaecus?
     
  16. KezyGLA

    KezyGLA Arachnoking Active Member

    50 shades of brown
     
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  17. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    "This one is bluish brown!"
    "This one is purplish brown!"
    "This one is charcoal brown!"

    Again, people don't buy them for the colors :D C. fimbriatus is the dazzler of the genus, and even they're pale compared to most pokies.
     
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