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bald headed hornets

Discussion in 'Insects, Other Invertebrates & Arthropods' started by kingstubb, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. kingstubb

    kingstubb Arachnosquire Old Timer

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    I have a nest in my back yard I really wouldn't like to kill them but I cant just have it there. Mowing the lawn/ people being around etc. I want the nest for display purposes what would be the best course of action to preserve it. Its about 8'' wide and 10'' long. Im sure theyre are a couple hundred hornets residing in it. I know go at night and be fully covered. But will raid or warm water and soap destroy the nest.
     
  2. Le Wasp

    Le Wasp Arachnoknight Old Timer

    It's not an ideal solution, but if you've survived with it there for this much of the year, you could just let nature take its course. With the temperature cooling down in the fall, they should move out fairly soon; then you can just take the nest down, unoccupied. I'm not too familiar with the nest dynamics of the bald-faced hornet, but I think they're a species that overwinters away from the nest, under debris.
     
  3. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    I have around 5 hornet nests i keep for display. They are all larger than basketballs. I am pretty sure that the queen burrows underground in the winter, and the rest of the colony dies in the nest. When you find a abandoned nest you will notice that there are dead hornets inside, and im pretty sure this is why. I used to travel dirt roads around here after winter was over looking for nests to collect. They dont reuse the same nest either, the queen starts a new colony and nest from scratch. Your best bet like mentioned above, would be to let nature take its course, and wait until after winter time is over.
     
  4. josh_r

    josh_r Arachnoprince

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    Catfishrod is dead on. The colony will die with the dropping winter temps. The new queens will leave the nest and find shelter underground to avoid the freezing temps. This leaves the nest abandoned... Word of wisdom.... WAIT to harvest the nest until you have had some good hard freezes. Often, if you harvest the nest too early, you will get stragglers in the nest that come to with the warmth of your home and you will find an angry hornet or two waiting to sink a sting into you.
     
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  5. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    The extreme mercenary approach. When the nest appears to be mostly abandoned, little or no activity, discharge a CO2 fire extinguisher at it at close range. The stragglers will freeze to death. The CO2 won't harm the nest material.
     
  6. kingstubb

    kingstubb Arachnosquire Old Timer

    We have had a good drop in temps So I took it off the tree it is now on my backporch where I will let any others die in time. I want to display it in a shadow box and Have a section cut off so people can see the inside. Ive never cut into a nest but I know how fragile they are. Any suggestions would be great. Thanks. Here are some pictures for size. there are plenty of hornets still inside shook alittle and 10-15 came tumbling out I feel there is almost 100 still inside.
    CAM00219.jpg
    CAM00220.jpg
     
  7. Very cool! Please update us with a pic once you figure out how to get it open!
     
  8. kingstubb

    kingstubb Arachnosquire Old Timer

  9. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    I think your best bet cutting it open would be a hacksaw or limbsaw. It might mess it up a little bit, but that isnt going to be avoidable. Good luck either way!
     
  10. hornet nest

    Here is a pic of one I just got this week and put in my bug room as you can see there still coming out lol they are livin about a day then dieing and not aggressive to me as for keeping nest I just hang up and dont touch they stay good for long time this one is big 24 inches long and 14 inches across widest point .. there has been a good dozen hornets come out still more I didnt want to take a chance with this one getting tore up dont see any this big around here and not tore up
     
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  11. kingstubb

    kingstubb Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Thats awesome...one day Ill have a bug room...its basically my bedroom right now. Im thinking of cutting into one side to reveal the inside. and displaying it in something like this.

    http://www.michaels.com/Black-Basketball-Sports-Case/fr0802,default,pd.html?cgid=products-framing-displaycases

    Do you have any experience with cutting them with minimal damage?

    ---------- Post added 11-14-2013 at 06:25 PM ----------

    If I kept the hanging branch I would display it the way you have it but I already have one like that wanted to do something new.
     
  12. I think like catfishrod said a hack saw blade would work, the out side of the nest is the fragile part, on the sides espeically ,,,the top will be thicker and more solid the inside like a regular wasp nest in a way some what tuffer, its going be hard not to tear it ,, but a little glue will bond it back in places , post some pics when you do , might be a neat way to view them.
     
  13. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    The local insect authority here recommends using an extremely sharp serrated knife as it leaves no debris. He uses an electric carving knife when cutting up rotting logs, nests and anything else that is soft. But he has pointed out, the correct electric carving knife must be the expensive variety that has paired blades that come together flat with the tapers distal to each other. These knives are capable of sawing up small tree limbs using water to keep the blades cool and lubricated.
     
  14. josh_r

    josh_r Arachnoprince

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    You could also get those really long razor blades used for cutting carpet or used for tile scrapers and cut it that way. they are very sharp and you would just have to take your time with it. If you feel brave and have access to it.... A chop saw with a very fine blade (90 or 100 tooth) would make a very clean cut as long as you made the cut very slow. In other words, don't lower the saw too fast into the nest.
     
  15. hibiscusmile

    hibiscusmile Arachnopeon

    I think u a crazy man! when u open it up they are bound to come out, there are probably a thousand inside, I pray for you,,,,,a lot!

    If you know anyone with an electric meat saw it would work or see if u could borrow a foam saw, that would really work, I have one, but
    you cannot come here to use it! LOL

    ps, yes an electric blade used for bread or meat carving is only 12.00 at most drug stores or walmart, it would not have to cut all the way
    thru it , u would just turn it as u go and it would then cut thru it that way. I have had two hugh nest here the last couple years, but when the bad
    weather came they bleu away...
     
  16. Malhavoc's

    Malhavoc's Arachnoking Old Timer

    Razorblade is your best bet, or a fine point dremel bit.
     
  17. Le Wasp

    Le Wasp Arachnoknight Old Timer

    I've never tried this, but I would probably try using a dremel tool. I think the rotary cutting disks should work well, especially the diamond cut-off wheel. That should cut smoothly without grabbing and tearing the thin paper of the outer nest. Just try it on a section that will be cut off first in case there's damage. Sounds like an exciting project! Good luck!
     
  18. josh_r

    josh_r Arachnoprince

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    I'm really not too sure using a diamond bit would cut as smooth as you think. They are specifically designed to cut through hard surfaces like glass and tile. Using a blade or bit designed for extremely fine cuts in wood is a better bet. The dremel is a great idea too. Whatever is chosen, the cut should be made slow.
     
  19. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Oh! If you try using a serrated knife, the guy suggests you moisten the nest first with a high humidity environment. He says that way you don't get little bits flaking and breaking off.
     
  20. Wadew

    Wadew Arachnobaron Old Timer

    A paper cutter will be the best approach IMO


    -Wade