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baby pineapple

Discussion in 'Live Plants' started by Galapoheros, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Yip, planted some seeds and one came up.
    [​IMG], blurry:sorry:

    too wet, heating it up and letting it dry out.
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    mmmmm....i wish i could grow that here in WI.

    Did you know that a pineapple is not a singular fruit, but rather a cluster grouped tightly together....i love pineapples.
     
  3. antinous

    antinous Phormic-Addict Arachnosupporter

    Wish I could grow pineapples here too. Maybe I'll try indoors, since I'm starting a 'grow room' I could possibly try my hand at a pineapple plant. Brings back the memories of when I was in Peru herping and came across a Bothrops in a hollowed out pineapple I was about to pick from the plant lol
     
  4. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Mom in law grows pineapple along side her house. Growing in pure crap mingy dry soil. Without moisture the fruit are very small. Too much moisture they can rot before maturing. Seem to be very tolerant as long as they get a lot of heat and direct sunlight.
     
  5. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I saw a show claiming that shipped pineapples suck compared to other varieties, do you know anything about that? I remember a woman in Africa holding a pineapple in the show. She said, "This is what everybody should want, the shipped pinapples don't compare to these." They don't ship the one she was holding because they don't ship well, bruise and rot too fast, called something like the "bread pineapple", something like that. I don't think it had the core like the ones in the stores here. I'd like to get seeds, have a greenhouse some day and grow things like that.
     
  6. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    No, didn't know that, also thought it weird they're a bromeliad.
    I can't grow them here either but I have dreams of growing stuff like this in a greenhouse someday.
     
  7. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I think this is the one I'd like to grow
     
  8. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    Some other bromeliads that aren't closely related to pineapples have fruit that still looks weirdly similar. For example, to my mind Puya Raimondii has a fruit that just looks like you took a pineapple, made it green, and stretched it.
     
  9. Wlfkfilms

    Wlfkfilms Arachnopeon

    I have a few pineapples around the house. The easiest way to grow the, is year off the green top and plant it. It will grow into a full new plant.
     
  10. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    That's the way I've done it in the past, I wanted to try to get one going from seed. I've wondered, if the top of the one is popped off, planted and popped off from that plant and planted year after year that way, does it finally "run out" so to speak?, wear out, ...give up the ghost eventually?, do you know? I assumed it does so I tried to grow one from seed for a new start.
     
  11. Wlfkfilms

    Wlfkfilms Arachnopeon

    They shouldn't really ever run out. It's just another form of vegetative growth, like runners on cattails. I imagine you can just keep going for as long as you want by topping new pineapples and planting them. In fact, I believe that's the standard method for folks who want to keep the same basic fruit strain intact.
     
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  12. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I've wondered if cattail runners finally give it up over the years also, or take the seedless banana, could it go for 1000s of more years(?) Makes me wonder what the oldest plant 'really' is.
     
  13. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    Plant somatic reproduction can continue indefinitely, as long as sufficient resources are supplied and they don't succumb to predation or disease.

    The oldest plant is believed to be Pando, an 80,000 year old colony of quaking aspen in Utah. It's basically gotten lucky with climate and disease so far, I guess. The only problem with repeated growth like that is eventually you get somatic line mutations, which should lead, over a sufficiently long time, to multiple genetic organisms over the span of one interconnected plant. Sometimes on trees you see witch's brooms, which are essentially tree cancer (though not nearly as dangerous for the tree) and are the result of that process of budding.