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Avicularia avicularia dehydration

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Lumina, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

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    I have a sub-adult female Avic avic (not sure on her age but her DLS is ~4"). I adopted her on 9/21 from a woman who was no longer able to care for her.
    The previous owner fed her the day before I picked her up. But the only time I've gotten her to eat was Wednesday 9/26. I've been offering her live pinhead roaches every day with feeding tongs but she refuses to eat. She also hasn't started constructing a substantial web. I've noticed that her abdomen looks smallish so I'm beginning to get concerned. I don't believe she's near pre-molt either. She's grooming herself and somewhat active at night but I'm afraid she's getting dehydrated (or already is).
    ...I removed her from her enclosure and now have her in a deli cup with a vented lid and put paper towels (moistened with warm water) in it. The room i have her in is maintained at 75° F.
    I've never dealt with a situation like this so I could use some pointers. My main question is how long should I leave her in "ICU"? And Should I try feeding her while she's in there? 20181008_121620.jpg 20181008_122959.jpg
     
  2. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoknight

    Tried any other feeders? And did you really use "pin head roaches " to feed a sub-adult 4'' female?? Because that sounds too little of a meal for something that size.
     
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  3. MissouriArachnophile

    MissouriArachnophile Arachnosquire Active Member

    Both of my A. Avics will take medium dubia or large crickets. One is 3.5 ish, the other is 4 maybe close to 5. Only need to mist the wall every couple of days and leave a water bowl with it. Not sure about ICU stuff, leave that to the more experienced keepers.
     
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  4. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnobaron Active Member

    Get her out of the ICU. That's the best way of killing her.

    Maybe she doesn't want to feed yet because she's still settling in. Put her back in her hopefully dry enclosure. Make sure she has a water dish, maybe a second one higher up, so, she'll definitely be able to find the water, and leave her be. If you're really worried that her abdomen is getting smaller, try to take a proper picture of her abdomen. From what I can see she seems healthy.

    Also, like @Liquifin said pinhead roaches aren't the right size. I'd use adult lateralis with her size. But not right now if she doesn't want to eat. 2 weeks of fasting are nothing for a T.
     
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  5. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Yeah, as others have said, get it out of the ICU. It looks healthy enough, I wouldn't start to worry just yet... or at all, if I'm right.

    In the first picture, the camera flash is right where I'm trying to look, but there's a halfway decent shot of the pedipalps. They look curled under the spider, and I don't see any pink toes. Meaning you have a mature male, which would explain 100% of the behavior you described as well as the skinny abdomen. Could you take one more picture of the spider, particularly of the pedipalps? Ventral shot or dorsal shot, it doesn't matter, whatever you can get :)
     
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  6. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    Looks male to me too, even just looking ventrally.

    Get it out of the ICU asap...just needs a water dish. You can guide him towards it if your really paranoid, thirsty spiders will dive face first for a drink.
     
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  7. Aleetist

    Aleetist Arachnosquire Active Member

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    I second this. Get that T out of the ICU and back into its enclosure. Ts get most of the moisture they need from prey and any additional water they will seek out, so just leave a filled water dish, even putting the dish in the substrate, my arboreals find their way down to the water if they need it. If it just ate before you got it not eating a week later is no big deal. Spiders also take time to settle in to new places. It took my A. Purpurea sling over a month to start webbing her enclosure and they are supposed to be prolific webbers, sometimes it takes time. Now, if you have a MM like a lot of people think you do, it may very well never eat in your care or web, just wander around it's enclosure until it passes. Some MM keep up a healthy appetite and some don't but very rarely will they invest time in webbing (other than a sperm web) since they only have one thing on the brain. Also, as others have said try bigger prey, could just not be interested in something so tiny, but I'd move it back and wait a week before offering prey again.
     
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  8. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

    Been trying both pinheads and medium-large roaches. Tried large crickets too. No luck.

    Yea, been trying all those feeders :( ... Also have been misting the enclosure twice a week. She has a water dish. Though I haven't seen her drink from it yet.

    Are either of these photos better? ...I was told by the previous owner that she was a confirmed female. I don't know if she got the information from a reputable source though.
    20181008_183211.jpg 20181008_182323.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2018
  9. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Nope, 100% mature male. Sorry about that.
     
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  10. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

    Back in the enclosure now. I always keep a water dish available (in the substrate). I have 2 purpurea slings as well. My 1" sling has a massive web. My 3/4" keeps more of a "hammock" style web.

    Now when you say the mature male may never eat in my care, are you referring to hand-feeding with tongs?

    Oh wow okay. You're able to determine that from just the pedipalps?

    I always keep a water dish available. He/she isn't thirsty. Have some water misted next to him and not showing any interest.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2018
  11. Aleetist

    Aleetist Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Mature males can just refuse food up until they they go to the great web in the sky. Some may continue to eat, some may eat sparingly, and some will never eat again, depends on the spider but, continue to offer during weekly feedings in case it does want something that week. They literally become one track animals after maturing and that is to find a mate before they die, no time for eating or webbing, just making the next generation. You probably only have a few months left with the spider, just do your best to give him a cozy home. He will start to get smaller and look more raggedy and eventually pass. Sorry it was passed off to you as female, just try to enjoy the time you have with him and try not to worry about things too much.
     
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  12. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

    Damn. Well that's incredibly disappointing. Now I feel tempted to get him a female :sorry:
     
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  13. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    If thats the case why do you think its dehydrated? o_O

    Little confused here lol, I guess its just another case of the new keeper jitters.
     
  14. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

    Because I haven't seen her go down to the floor at all. So that combined with refusing food
     
  15. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    Yeah most mine didn’t live long enough to breed I tried to sell em locally no luck. I was too afraid to ship em , right now too low on money to buy shipping supplies.
    Most don’t eat at all, I’ve seen a few that did eat pretty voracious at first then stop.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
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  16. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnoreaper Arachnosupporter

    Yeah, you can see the emboli, all MMs have them.

    There is no need to do this, this species is fine with the occasional overflowing of the water dish but should otherwise be kept dry.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2018
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  17. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

    How long did they live?

    20181009_072559_1539087380498.jpg So it looks like he decided to eat :)
    ...I left a decapitated medium-sized roach on the plastic plant next to his little bits of webbing. When I woke up, the roach was gone and he still had little remnants of food in his mouth :p
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2018
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  18. Aleetist

    Aleetist Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Glad he still has appetite, probably means he is more freshly matured which means he has a little bit more time on this earth. Good luck on finding him a lady friend <3 If either of mine would be mature in time I would totally help you out. Take care!
     
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  19. Lumina

    Lumina Arachnosquire Active Member

    Yea that makes sense-he has to still be a juvenile since his DLS is only ~4".
    Thanks for your help! Fingers crossed I'll find him a mate. That would be awesome :)
     
  20. Krystal Anne

    Krystal Anne Arachnosquire Active Member

    Mature males can't be juveniles as they are fully grown/mature and won't grow anymore. It's normal for MM's to be much smaller than females. I think the other person meant that he had his final molt not too long ago, that's why he still has an appetite. Regardless, it's nice to see him doing okay! Good luck with him :)
     
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