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Arizona Bark Scorpion Enclosure

Discussion in 'Vivariums and Terrariums' started by chalon9, Feb 20, 2018.

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    Hey all, I am the proud owner of a little Arizona Bark scorpion. However, I am new to scorpions and am unsure of what kind of enclosure to use. I know that scorpions can climb rough edges, but I was hoping that the first enclosure attached might work? If it can climb it though, the gaps in the lid would be wide enough for it to slip through. Anyone experienced enough to provide advice? If not, I have a small plastic container I can drill some holes in, but it doesn’t look as pretty and it might be too small. It’s the second picture. Thanks in advance.

    PS What’s the best substrate to use? I read that playground sand was good and calcium sand was bad. Any pointers?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince Active Member

    Taller more vertical enclosures with vertical bark and hiding spots is the rule typically for that species.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
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  3. Ah, so they are climbers then. I found so many conflicting reports, some people said they don’t climb at all and some said they climb a lot. I’ll probably play it safe then. Do you think this would work? That’s my hand for a height comparison
     

    Attached Files:

  4. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince Active Member

    Perfect. A screw top lid with small holes put in is great.
     
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  5. Do you think its tall enough for him to be happy? What kind of substrate do you recommend? And scorpions don;t require a water dish correct? I imagine they get it from their prey like tarantulas?
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2018
  6. darkness975

    darkness975 will the Sun ever rise? Arachnosupporter

    Tarantulas and scorpions require a water dish. I can't figure out who ever started the myth that they don't drink.

    Centruroides sculpturatus require vertically-oriented bark to hide, climb, and molt in.

    A couple of inches of play sand for substrate is fine since they spend their time climbing.

    They cannot climb smooth surfaces like glass.

    Feed once a week or every other week.

    Don't get tagged. It will ruin your day (though not typically "lethal").
     
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  7. Good to know about the water dish! Ive always given my tarantulas dishes because I thought they looked nice, but Ive never seen them use it. But Ill be sure to include one here then. Do you think the terrarium I had in the first picture is tall enough or should I go for the third one? Third one is definitely more secure, but the first one looks a lot nicer and would be easier to maintain.
     
  8. darkness975

    darkness975 will the Sun ever rise? Arachnosupporter

    You're better off with the vertically oriented enclosure.

    Yes they drink.


    Calcium sand is bad and also a waste of money.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Didn't mean to make it sound like I was doubting you about them drinking, I absolutely believe you. I had only meant that I had never personally seen mine drink and combined with hearing that they don't need to, i was misinformed :) And okay, pretzel jug it is!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  10. darkness975

    darkness975 will the Sun ever rise? Arachnosupporter

    They don't drink often but still need moisture.

    In nature they burrow as well. Moisture levels vary
     
  11. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince Active Member

    Many a pretzel jug has been used as an enclosure.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Well I got the pretzel jug and put a couple inches of sand in before I placed him inside. I put a piece of bark in there for him to climb on and hide under. But this morning I woke up and he’s been acting really strange. Very erratic movement and sometimes is unresponsive to stimuli. Is something wrong with it? Is it preparing to molt or is there a problem?
     
  13. darkness975

    darkness975 will the Sun ever rise? Arachnosupporter

    Post images and/or videos.
     
  14. crlovel

    crlovel Arachnopeon

    If I may disagree? My Arizona barks have never been climbers. To my experience, even when offered areas to climb, they'd prefer to go under leaves, into cork tubes, under wood. They WILL climb - but when I go looking for them, they're tucked away and hidden in debris, even sometimes pushing down between the dirt and terrarium glass (not burrowing - this species doesn't burrow - just pushing down into the crevice between dried out peat and the glass). The only time they climb, that I have observed, is when hunting, and the climbing they did was purely incidental.

    My growing colony has moved from a 10, to a 20, and now to a 50 gallon terrarium.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  15. CWilson1351

    CWilson1351 Arachnobaron

    Interesting, I have a much smaller communal than you and I usually can spot at least half to 3 quarters of mine up above ground on the cork I gave them, or in some of the crevices and gaps in it. I wonder why we both see different behaviors.
    Anyhow, @chalon9 here is a photo of what I have mine in. You can probably see the blur of a couple of the little ones even. I have since added water dishes since I felt bad for scattering them all each time I would spray one side. Hopefully yours is doing well!
    20171229_134315.jpg
     
  16. crlovel

    crlovel Arachnopeon

    You do have Arizona Barks, not Florida or Cubans? In my old tank, I had several cork and wood logs that were higher - even then, mine avoided the perches, they always went under the flat sheets or skulls, or pushed down into the soil between the glass and dried dirt. They never went high, to live, or exhibited any "arboreal" behavior. They always preferred the low areas. Since moving them into a terrarium that's only 10" high, they've been perfectly content. Three more mothers with babies, and they're under cork sheets now. I do have one tall tunnel, a BIG tunnel - and I can see exactly one scorpion inside it. Most of them avoid it.

    I don't consider myself an expert on barks in any way - I actually keep mine somewhat different than most of the advice I've seen recommends. Heat in the low 70's to low 80's, humidity ranging from 35 to about 75. Soil moist in areas, not dried throughout. I also don't maintain a water dish - I just pour a few bottles of spring water over the screen, and dampen the whole area. They're thriving.
     
  17. CWilson1351

    CWilson1351 Arachnobaron

    Yeah, they are definitely C. sculpturatus. I trust who I got them from 100% with the identification. The ones I have are my first venture into anything from North America with any significant venom, so I'm definitely not an expert either. I try new things with them, slowly. I am still working out a nice self sustaining ecosystem for them. I have just started to increase the amount of prey insects for them since I finally saw some scorplings, but the female had a few in her mouth. Pretty sad moment really. I was so excited seeing some on my biggest females back, even called out "BABIES!!!" to my wife.
    Very under appreciated species I think. Especially considering that just between you and I, we have found they are pretty adaptable and behavior can vary. I actually am following your thread regarding your colony. Quite impressive and has been helpful to me, so a big thank you is in order!
     
  18. crlovel

    crlovel Arachnopeon

    I have to agree - I've had Emperors. They're big and impressive, but boring. I have three Asian Forests together, nearly a year. No babies. I see one maybe once a month. Boring. The Arizona barks, they're everywhere. They move around frequently. They actively hunt, constantly. When they grab a cricket that's twice their size, they lay into it. I've seen two fight over the same cricket and actually pull the cricket apart. They use their stingers for more than a decoration. They're a NEAT species.

    What you said about prey items - I'd consider adding isopods and raising the humidity. The babies will go for crickets much bigger than they are - but they'll get isopods, too. The adults will leave the pods alone. Also, ALWAYS keep crickets in the terrarium. I buy ten dozen tiny crickets (a few mm to a 1/4 inch) a week, and a few dozen mediums (1/4 to 1/2 inch), and they're always gone within that week. The leftover larges from feeding the rest of the animals also get tossed to the scorpions or centipedes. Adults who have a food source will less likely turn to cannibalism - although cannibalism is impossible to avoid. Babies will get eaten. And that's okay, too - it happens.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  19. CWilson1351

    CWilson1351 Arachnobaron

    I have been thinking about isopods lately so I'll definitely give it a shot. I think the amount of crickets I had in there just wasn't enough. Always saw some leftover still hopping around but they may have not been in range of the scorpions. I always added more crickets than I have scorpions, but I may try doubling or even tripling the numbers and see how that works. Instead of continuing to hijack this thread I will ask my questions on yours though :)