1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Any cactus growers here?

Discussion in 'Live Plants' started by Brian S, Jul 24, 2018.

  1. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Advertisement
    In 2014 I made a trip to the great state of Texas. Since then I have had a great appreciation for the SW culture not just the food scene but the plants as well. Fortunately here in the Ozarks we do have a native cactus that is quite easy to grow. This is commonly called Eastern Prickly pear. It is easy to grow. I started this from cuttings from a plant on my grandparents property. An old grill lid is all that is needed to grow these. The flowers are beautiful. Pollinating insects will agree.
     

    Attached Files:

    • Like Like x 6
    • Love Love x 2
  2. tewebag

    tewebag Arachnoknight

    I have a couple different types of cactus growing around the house right now, I could not tell you names or anything because they came from cuttings from my grandma's plants years ago before she passed. Pretty simple things to grow, I forgot I have them for months at a time and they still survive.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,976
    1,559
    923
    texas
    lol I still have transvaalicus genetic line from you from back in 2007 or 8, don't remember, I think I got babies from you back then anyway. That cacti is taken for granted here, it's all over the place. They can be made to grow like a tree but it takes decades. You have to keep breaking off lobes to create a trunk.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    That one is really lovely! I have one cactus, a Glandulicactus glandulifera, and I also have two Haworthiopsis attenuata sharing a pot (though they're genetically identical and both producing basal offshoots). For now I've avoided keeping more because I mostly haven't got enough light. I like a lot of funky looking desert species though, so there are a bunch on my wish list.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I always loved seeing eastern prickly pear when I lived in Illinois. Found it in my favorite habitats, sand prairies. Now I'm in Texas and there are so many different cactus types I don't even know where to start lol. I keep a few species of cactus (can't remember what they're called, most came unlabeled :grumpy:) and some Huernia.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Great!!! I was wondering if any of my scorpion lines are still around. Those were fun times for sure
     
  7. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Last year I started this cold Hardy cactus bed in front of my house. There chollas and prickly pear plants. It will take a few years for them to fill it out but I am patient. In the lower left there is one sent to me by Old Hag in Utah. Any of you remember her? It would probably be worth your time to look up some of the threads here we engaged in. We had alot of fun at each other's expense lol
     

    Attached Files:

    • Like Like x 1
  8. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    This is my Giant Saquaro. Not a giant and grows slowly. I have had this 4 years now. Sorry about not giving scientific names. I am posting off my phone. If I was at the office using PC it is easier to look them up. Remebering names of cacti is about as hard as bugs lil
     

    Attached Files:

  9. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Growing a Saguaro is definitely a Zen thing. Only a few more decades until it is mature.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    I will be 50 in November my decades are running out haha
     
  11. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,976
    1,559
    923
    texas
    A few,
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    grew these chollas from seeds last year, they grow kind of fast for a cactus.
    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 4
  12. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Nice cacti!!! Never grew from seeds before. How long does it take them to come up?
     
  13. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,976
    1,559
    923
    texas
    I don't remember, maybe only a few days. Desert plants usually germinate real fast after you keep the seeds wet because in nature they have to hurry up to get a tap root down before it dries up again.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. aphono

    aphono Arachnobaron

    A few miscellaneous cactus around the yard. Pachycereus marginatus, a couple Echinocereus, Echinopsis hybrids, Cereus "Peruvian apple"- delicious fruit! Would love to find out if there might be cultivars with different fruit tastes but also as a way to get non- clones to see if that improves fruit set. Sometimes they will throw up a lot flowers yet none of them set.. Recently got cuttings of Cereus azureus and monstrose Cereus- the bumpy, tall growing variety.

    Is anybody good with cactus ID? . Got these from a friend in Albuquerque- she uses them to feed her turtles. Flowers are solid bright yellow if that helps any.

     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    @Galapoheros nice Astrophytum asterias (is it super kabuto?), what's the other one?
     
  16. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Aphono, we were in Peru in May. My wife is from there. They sell fruit of a large prickly pear in the markets. They call it "tuna". Is that what you are calling Peruvian apple? It is a large fruit slightly smaller than an apple
     
  17. aphono

    aphono Arachnobaron

    Mine is Cereus peruvianus(depsite the name they are not actually from Peru), a columnar branching cactus. I'm not too clear on the naming- tuna usually is prickly pear/pad type cactus fruit. So far it seems majority of non-pad type cactus fruit gets lumped under 'pitaya'.. including peruvianus fruits. The majority of pitayas at markets in general are Hylocereus, aka dragonfruit though. As far as I'm aware, only the peruvianus fruit has no spines or scales on it. Simply grab the fruit with bare hands, peel, eat.

    The peruvianus fruits are variable in size, even on the same arm.. from tennis ball size to a little bigger than apples.

    Link to page with excellent info and video with adorable toddler:

    http://tastylandscape.com/2013/04/24/a-very-tasty-cactus-cereus-peruvianus/

    I just learned from that page there are varieties with yellow or pink fruit.. not sure if they meant peruvianus or got that mixed up with dragonfruit. Would absolutely love to have those varieties if they're truly Cereus sp!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  18. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,976
    1,559
    923
    texas
    I think the other one is a baby one ....https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/508/ I got the superK at a cactus show, almost got ripped off. I got the cactus home, was going to repot it, looked at the root and it was rotting away. I think the seller knew it was in trouble. It was kind of expensive too for a little cactus, maybe $20, don't remember. I put it in some good desert soil, that saved it and it's at least 3 times bigger than it was when I bought it. It's almost the size of a small apple.


    I have that in my yard, I had a tortoise that would eat it also. So many sps. look like that though, I don't know. I've grown dragon fruit cactus from seed, from store bought fruit. Do they sell Peruvian apple in any store around there? You could prob just grow from seed. What I grew wasn't cold hardy and froze.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    If anyone cares (and you probably don't, I know), I misidentified my cactus--it's actually Ferocactus hamatacanthus. @Galapoheros yours and mine will look similar as they grow, I think.

    I ordered seeds of four very cool, but exceedingly slow growing species about a week ago--Obregonia denegrii, Strombocactus disciformis, Lophophora diffusa, and Geohintonia mexicana. I'm planning to grow them on gravel mixed with local silt, but I might change that to straight pumice or something along those lines. I'm going to add gypsum to the mix, I think, since they all naturally grow on calcium rich soils (though the first three usually grow on limestone, almost everything I've read has said not to use it, and plants definitely don't need it). My goal is to make them look as close to wild plants as possible, since all of those species often look bloated in cultivation (this is somewhat less of a concern with the Geohintonia).
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  20. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,976
    1,559
    923
    texas
    I wish they'd dump some laws concerning L. williamsii, imo they could let go of that now. If you get on the internet, you can see so many people propagating those things and selling them on the internet. There was a really good cactus nursery around here but the guy retired, he had some really weird plants.