1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Amblypygi - whip spiders pictures

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Banshee05, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. velvetundergrowth

    velvetundergrowth Lobopro Arachnosupporter

    Advertisement
    Can you be sure? The seller was adamant that it wasn't amanica, but he didn't seem the most knowledgeable. Very few of his animals were scientifically labelled, with many having totally incorrect common names in the place of actual useful info. A solifugid, vinegaroon and this whipspider were all labelled "Giant Whip-Scorpion"...:arghh:
     
  2. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    Yes, the bacilliform processes on the femur are doubtless. But I strongly doubt on the origin "Cameroon", this is clearly an eastern African species/genus. The only "similar" looking species, is Phrynichus exophthalmus known from western/central Africa. But we never know :)
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  3. Impressive! Pretty spot on! The Phrynus 2nd from the top right is indeed whitei. The bottom left however is a young Damon medius.

    -JohnD.
     
  4. velvetundergrowth

    velvetundergrowth Lobopro Arachnosupporter

    Thanks for the info! It seems I accidentally acquired my most desired Amblypygid! Hopefully he/she lasts... I have heard they are particularly sensitive. Mine is in a very moist enclosure for now but has hardly moved since bringing it home last Sunday :(
     
    • Love Love x 1
  5. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    They are easy to keep and raise, but complicated to breed, at least to me so far ;)
    You just need a lot of space when they moult.
     
  6. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    haha, good :)
    Anyway, very nice and good to see.
     
  7. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    See here in detail…
    E. bacillifer with "normal" long bacilliform processes.
    [​IMG]

    E. amanica with extremly elongated ones…
    [​IMG]

    and finally the normal spination, typical for Phrynichus species, here P. exophthalmus
    [​IMG]
     
    • Love Love x 3
    • Informative Informative x 2
  8. velvetundergrowth

    velvetundergrowth Lobopro Arachnosupporter

    Wow thanks for that!

    My E. amanica is very dark, almost black in color. I understand this can be due to poor husbandry but perhaps it's a trait found in juveniles of the species? (It's about an inch in body length).
    Sorry for all the bothersome Q's but I'm finding it really difficult to find info on this species :0
     
  9. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    Coloration does not help you a lot, as most of whip spiders change slightly their color during life time, due to the fact, that they continue molting a lifetime long and get darker when they are older. Beside the processes you can also tell these two species apart from their size, within the same time span, E. bacillifer would not get very big, instead E. amanica reach a very long pedipalp length within 2,5 years, they are huge in the end. Once seen, no never doubt on that; the same is true for Damon diadema/ D. vargiegatus… once seen real D. variegatus, you never call the eastern African species so, you do not need to be a scientific guy, just get once a correct ID species and look at them.
    Anyway, your specimen from the picture is already adult and quite huge, if you get fresh offspring, just wait 2-3 molts in the first 6 months, then you already can see it with your eyes and check the spination with a "better" photo.

    In detail about the bacilliform apophysis:
    E. amanica the first two, close to the trochanter, most distal ones, are the largest (in total three), they thickened and club shaped in large males;

    E. bacillifer the first one is very minor and not well developed and the second one (counted from distal of the pedipalp femur) is the largest, but very small compared to E. amanica's, sometimes there is another very small spinerlet in between, so than the largest is the 3rd one, here they are not thickened in males.

    On the weekend I can take shots of juveniles and adult-close up of both species.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  10. BobBarley

    BobBarley Arachnoprince

    2016E082-937F-43F2-957F-B79850DCF356.jpeg 16426718-50AA-40DA-AF68-7A61CA901A34.jpeg 0AEC3712-043B-4CE6-AE3F-C2CF7B44C89A.jpeg
    1.1 Heterophrynus batesii
     
    • Love Love x 4
    • Like Like x 1
  11. velvetundergrowth

    velvetundergrowth Lobopro Arachnosupporter

    Actually it's a little one! The total body length can't be more than an inch. Also, it has a highly peaked prostoma, appearing almost tarantula-like.
     
  12. velvetundergrowth

    velvetundergrowth Lobopro Arachnosupporter

    Heres a shot for scale:


    The good news is he/she seems to be settling in. It scurried away from the light for the fist time a few moments ago, as opposed to squatting motionless on the styrofoam despite being disturbed as it had the past few days. Fingers crossed!
     

    Attached Files:

    • Love Love x 1
  13. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnodemon Active Member

    • Like Like x 1
  14. BobBarley

    BobBarley Arachnoprince

    Yup! Now just waiting for some magic to happen... :)

    If I'm not wrong, your specimen is definitely sexually mature already and is relatively close to average max size for the species.
    Lots of whip spiders in general can look larger in photos when they prop themselves upward off of whatever they are perched on. It's a natural "forced perspective" that probably helps them appear more menacing to predators.
     
    • Love Love x 1
  15. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    All he had to do was ask.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  16. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

  17. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    Again, this is an adult specimen, not "a little one".
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  18. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. velvetundergrowth

    velvetundergrowth Lobopro Arachnosupporter

    Thanks for all the info :) I thought it looked small next to the videos of them online but glad to hear I was wrong :happy:
     
  20. Banshee05

    Banshee05 Arachnobaron Old Timer

    509
    190
    783
    as promised…
    E. bacillifer details
    [​IMG]

    E. amanica details
    [​IMG]
     
    • Informative Informative x 2