1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Am I ready for a Stromatopelma Calceatum?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by The Weed Man, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. Advertisement
    I been wanting to purchase a Stromatopelma Calceatum for awhile and been doing research on them. I think there a beautiful looking baboon. I have a Haplopelma Lividum and I got it as a beginner in the hobby 6 months ago to challenge myself and I never had a problem with her she's still alive and healthy and I can transfer her with out any problems. She just chills in her burrow all day so I know shes a happy T. What is your opinion? Should I wait? Am I ready?
     
  2. Amoeba

    Amoeba Arachnolord

    I think if you have this question then you aren't IMO. I'd get into fast arboreals (Psalmopoeus, Tapinauchenius, Iridopelma, Poecilotheria) instead of comparing an arboreal to a pet hole.

    Also when writing the binomial nomenclature you capitalize the first letter of the genus and leave the species lowercase. Ex: Stromatopelma calceatum, Haplopelma lividum. Real sticklers and scientific papers would like you to italicize it too.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  3. Well it's really not a pet hole if you ask me she stays in there for awhile but she comes out everyday as I see her come out at night. I think the term pet hole for H. lividum doesn't apply to all like haplofool said in one of his videos if you know who he is and I have a fast enough reaction to aviod getting bit by a very fast T and I also play it safe when it comes to old worlds. I agree with you maybe I'm not ready but I'll take your advice with other suggestions. Thanks for the cap correction on the species I never knew that but I did it because my iPhone tries to correct it when I don't caps it.
     
  4. Storm76

    Storm76 Arachnoemperor

    3,558
    3,676
    378
    Germany
    How much interaction did you have with your H. lividum really? How do you feed it? That's the point in my opinion. After all, you'll have to do tank maintenance, maybe even treat her in case of sickness, rehouse her, feed her and all that.

    If you can say for yourself that your H. lividum doesn't give you any trouble at all when having to interact with it...maybe. If you can't answer that with a firm "No problem" - then you're surely not ready.

    Plus, asking that on here, is kinda a void question since none of us can tell if you're ready since that question alone kinda shows doubts on your end...doesn't it?

    /EDIT: You will -not- be able to avoid a bite if your T decides to bite all of a sudden. That's a lightning-fast attack with no warning often from OWs...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    I have 2 adult female S. calceatum, recently hatched out over a 100 babies. These tarantulas are extremely fast. Your H. lividum is a G. rosea compared to these. In my opinion they are not any more deffensive than any Pokies, and are more willing to shy away. My females i see everyday, and then they dissapear. I have had no troubles out of either of them, but when rounding up many babies, it can be nerve wrecking. Especially since they can be across the room before your eyes have time to tell your brain what happened. I suggest starting with a Psalmopoeus or Tapinachenius. They are both very fast, arboreal, but have way milder venom. If you can handle them, you are ready for a S. cal. Being we cant control what you decide, i leave it in your hands. But i congratulate you on a fine choice. Every experienced hobbyist should have atleast one of these. Good luck.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Well I do cage maintenance every month. Spray her enclosure every day. Feed her every to weeks or when she peeks out of her burrow which means shes hungry never failed not to eat when she peeks out. I don't rehouse her because she is already a 5" MF and shes in a large critter keeper with 6" of substrate and her burrows go throught her whole enclosure. She never had any kind of sickness but I know when they do have sicknesses then I look for signs that I reasearched on. Overall no problems with her. I posted because I wanted to know some opinions you know. I agree with the whole post thing it does make me look unprepared. True on the whole bite out of know where thing she attempted to run up my paint brush when I first got her and put her in her enclosure and she tried to take a nip at me more then just one strike but i avioded it but got lucky. Now I don't use a paint brush I just scoop her up with a catch cup and makes it a lot easier and safer then a paint brush. I know depending on how pissed you get them they'll bite more than once. I agree with both of you guys and I guess I should get a little more expirence with fast arboreals before getting one. Thanks to both of you guys. Really appreciate it.

    ---------- Post added 04-21-2012 at 01:46 PM ----------

    Thanks bro you gave me some more hope. I agree they are very beautiful baboons. I'll take your advice with the Psalmopoeus species because I've been also wanting a sun tiger and that will get me more prepared for a S. calceatum.
     
  7. Storm76

    Storm76 Arachnoemperor

    3,558
    3,676
    378
    Germany
    Try something that was suggested by the others if you want a great arboreal ;)

    After all - it is entirely YOUR choice. I'm not gonna tell you "don't" - I'm just thinking it might be better to get something else first. Especially, since arboreals are no "pet holes" really and are more skittish than a T that's in her burrow ;)

    Like this:
    Although I'd maybe rule out the Poecies, since those are OW too and bites have quite long-lasting effects...anyways. Totally your choice ;)
     
  8. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Your welcome. You wont be dissapointed with a P. irminia. They are gorgeous, and a awesome species. But look forward to that S. calceatum, they are the super arboreals in my eyes.
     
  9. Jared781

    Jared781 Arachnobaron

    your point sort of makes sense... its funny how you say hes not ready when you're just saying what you think, no one knows if he is ready or not except maybe him..! Also, you say hes not ready for that type of T yet you suggest some of the fastest Ts in the hobby???

    ITS almost garunteed everyone asked the same thing right before getting an OW... Also, he has already acquired an H. lividum which is a defensive species... WHICH he had for six months, now how is that not "training"
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2012
  10. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Those Ts might be some of the fastest in the hobby, but thier venom is alot milder. He would get great practice dealing with fast arboreals, and not run the risk of being bitten by a potent one until he is better experienced with the speed that joins it.
     
  11. Storm76

    Storm76 Arachnoemperor

    3,558
    3,676
    378
    Germany
    Do you realize that Haplopelmas are insanely fast if they want to be, Jared? Amoeba merely pointed out, that getting one of the most potent and fastest arboreal T's in the hobby, is probably not the best idea if the T you have experience with is a burrower that usually stays in its burrow...I think you misread his post...
     
  12. John, I've been interested in these for awhile, too, and if I recall...you have grown H. maculata as well? If you do...in your experience, are the two similar in terms of behavior? I ask because as quick as maculata can be, they also tend to hide quickly at the first disturbance and want to know if calceatum is similar in that regard...
     
  13. Jared781

    Jared781 Arachnobaron

    im aware... YET basically every T can be insanely fast if they want to be and/or if they need to!!! :p and no i did not mis read his post! aha
    the speedy Ts i have, (Psalms, and Poecis) for an example are ONLY interested in getting away and have never displayed a thread pose yet and my Poeci is 3.25"+ and from what iv heard S. calceatum stand their ground? he should get a quite defensive Terestral T for the experience gaining!
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2012
  14. paassatt

    paassatt Arachnoangel

    To say that certain species (in this case, an African arboreal) aren't faster than other species such as, say for example, new world terrestrials is absurd. Every tarantula can kick it into overdrive if they want to, but that doesn't mean that certain species aren't by nature much quicker than others.
     
  15. Jared781

    Jared781 Arachnobaron

    i never said NW Ts are faster.. i just stated basically every T can be quite fast if they need to IN general! i wasnt comparing

    like come on, If a B. verdezi was "racing" a Poeci... i wouldnt bet on the Brachy'! LOL
     
  16. Storm76

    Storm76 Arachnoemperor

    3,558
    3,676
    378
    Germany
    How big are your Psalms? Because my 4" irminia is a doll, even when rehousing. However, my 3" cambridgei female is -very- defensive and doesn't like to be disturbed at all. She shoots to the top of her corkbark even if I do tank maintanence...they're all different. So you owning calmer ones is great, but that's not always the case plus wait until your Psalms get bigger. As mentioned in other threads, Psalms are often more defensive than Poecis really ;)

    Either way, that wasn't my point, instead it was the difference between a fast, defensive and often skittish arboreal T and burrower that is fast, but usually stays in its burrow during daytime.

    @Passat:
    If you compare the -general- movement speed of a smithi with that of a Psalmopoeus, that's what I was talking about. Every T is fast when it wants to, but even if my pulchripes, smithi or auratum bolts - it's nowhere near the speed of the arboreals so far. However, arboreals are just a blur because they change directions SO quickly, you have problems following the movement.

    Probably should've emphasized that, but anyways let's not get into a discussion about that in this thread ;)
     
  17. paassatt

    paassatt Arachnoangel

    The point I was trying to make with regards to quickness is that while yes, every species can be fast when they want to be, there are species that are much quicker than others, all the time, not just some of the time. Just because someone is comfortable with occasional speed bursts from a generally slower, more docile species, they should not take that to mean that it's comparable to a species that is fast all the time.
     
  18. Amoeba

    Amoeba Arachnolord

    I was merely pointing out that he has to judge that himself and that by asking these sorts of questions he is doubting his skills IMO. I've worked hands on with big cats and one thing I was taught is you cannot be jerky or back out once you've started you have to get in there and do it without hesitation or you can be hurt.

    It's better to get something that is fast and kinda potent than something that is both.

    My only concern when I got my H lividum was if my girlfriend would be mad or not. I know they have more potent venom than my G rosea and are multi-biters but you know what? I believe I have enough skill and smarts to manage to avoid that.

    Comparing fossorials to arboreals is apples and oranges, But Amoebro they are both fruits....Well one has a stronger acid inside it. I'm coming up on my first year in this hobby this summer (drop in the bucket) and I don't feel like I could handle a S cal but something like a Pokie seems very manageable. On a rudimentary level Dealing with my A metallica is a different world from my PZB both are "docile" species but I've had one run up my tongs.

    To the original poster my advice is if you think you are indeed ready for this species A) Have tongs B) Know when to let go of those tongs C) practice safe rehousings and maintenance D) Use common sense. Ts are only defensive when we start messing with them and that's when you need to be the most careful, and do not let yourself get complacent.

    Good Luck, Be Safe, and Enjoy whatever spider you get.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Hey John, I have grown H. maculata for 2 years now, had one female i gave away, but still have both of her brothers. I also recieved a 5" female H. maculata in a collection buy. From everything i have learned with both species, they are both very shy, and will run and hide very fast. Mostly the slings-juvies will hide faster. The adults seem to let you be present for a minute, then slowly go into hiding. I have seen many threat displays from the H. maculata, and almost none at all from the S. calceatum. The H. maculata tend to stand their ground a little more, but will hide first. In my experience they act almost exactly the same. S. calceatum are most likely my favorite species, and i would love to see more of them in the hobby. What i would love more is if the rest of the species in the genus were in the hobby too, but i doubt that will ever happen. Hope this helps out.
     
  20. Necromion

    Necromion Arachnoknight

    I do love these threads, because whenever I see them the first thing that comes to my mind is "I know I'm not ready for this Sp. but I'm going to ask a bunch of people on a forum, and have them convince me that I can keep this sp." Now Ill admit that Im a firm believer in if you do your homework, know what your getting into, and are willing to accept the consequences then for all intents and purposes go for it but in this case I would say wait and get one of the other species mentioned.
     
    • Like Like x 1