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Alternatives to Cork Bark in Amblypygids Enclosures

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by MrCrackerpants, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. BobBarley

    BobBarley Arachnoprince Active Member

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    Depends on the species, and mesh is encouraged with these guys (as long as you can maintain proper humidity). Damon diadema, for example, is drought tolerant but likes it moist. Keep the substrate probably as moist as a Pamphobeteus with lots of vertical space. They are similar to Avicularia in that they will pretty much never touch the substrate. Give it a shot, I for one love amblies!
     
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  2. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    How large will they be? Small whiplings can be kept in small vials, while adults would do fine in a 32 oz deli cup. You can go larger for the adults, especially if you want to keep several in the same enclosure, but if you want bare bones, a 32 with a piece of bark/styrofoam will work.

    What species is your first whip and what's wrong with it?
     
  3. WeightedAbyss75

    WeightedAbyss75 Arachnoangel Active Member

    My first is a Damon Diadema. I made a thread about it approximately 2-3 months ago. For some reason, it suddenly stopped bring able to climb the cork tile I put in the enclosure. When I first got it, it could climb like it was nothing. Now, it struggles to even walk normally. It hasn't eaten either since I got it. What is really strange is that, despite it's current situation, it is still fairly active. It drags itself around by it's pedipalps, and won't take any food whatsoever. Many people said it was possible old age, I have no idea how old it is. It is a MM, which I know has not much to do with lifespan. Also, the P. marginemaculatus would be WC adults, so glad to know they can be kept in normal deli cups :)
     
  4. Ghoul

    Ghoul Arachnosquire

    Could be old age. But it also makes me think of my Damon diadema, when I got him he rarely ate crickets, but as soon as I got isopods (actually against mold issues) he'd eat one after another. Guess you can try that. If that doesn't work I guess his time has come already.
     
  5. WeightedAbyss75

    WeightedAbyss75 Arachnoangel Active Member

    I could try that, but ge is a fully grown adult. I feel he would have a very hard time eating isopods, unless they were a big species. What do you use for yours?
     
  6. Ghoul

    Ghoul Arachnosquire

    Oniscus asellus, they get quite big for terrestrial isopods. Snackbar size to an adult D. Diadema, but better than nothing. Mine always eats a few of them in one night, little fat bugger. :d
     
  7. WeightedAbyss75

    WeightedAbyss75 Arachnoangel Active Member

    Nice! I will certainly try to find some, but I have little hope for him... doesn't seem to be improving, no matter how much water I give him to drink, food to eat, or climbing material. that's why I was planning on getting younger specimen. Figure that I would know if I was doing something wrong if the old age possibility was out of the way. Just stinks that he ended up like he is. Despite that though, I have a spare enclosure now for any whips. Had to rehouse a T, and now I have this enclosure free:

    Figure that it is really tall, lots of space, and can have a background on it like styrofoam :D
     

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  8. Ghoul

    Ghoul Arachnosquire

    I do wonder how old he is right now, I get different answers whenever I try to look how old D. diadema can get, anything from 5 to 15 years! You seem to have tried everything so maybe he's just a grandpaps whip whose time has come :(
    Yeah get a juvie next time to be sure. Siblings can actually live together until they reach sexual maturity (for about one year), then they get more agressive towards eachother. Definitly interesting critters :D
     
  9. Has anyone tried using wires to suspend a sheet of screen in the enclosure as a molting platform for Damon diadema or Heterophrynus batesii?
     
  10. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    Haven't tried suspending anything, but I've kept D. diadema with some screen hot glued to the lid that they can climb up to and molt from.
     
  11. Really...Very interesting. What type of screen? Plastic or metal? Do you have a picture of the screen in the enclosure? If not, can you explain your set up to us? Did they successfully molt? If so, did you have a young juvenile that successfully molted multiple times and made it into adulthood? Thanks!
     
  12. Nephila Edulis

    Nephila Edulis Arachnoknight Active Member

    you can use styrofoam? That makes my job a lot easier. I've never kept amblypygids before but I've got a Charinus pestcotti coming and I didn't have much of a clue on the shedding surface
     
  13. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    Just plastic window screen. I have a bunch left over from setting up roach, widow, and mantid enclosures (though I don't keep mantids anymore). I don't have any pictures, but I'll see if I can find one that's similar. I've only really tried this small scale, but I keep smaller/young amblys in deli cups or vials with a slanting piece of cork or styrofoam and then glue a piece of widow screen to the lid. I make sure the slanted surface is close to the top so the amblys can climb on if they want. Sometimes they'll molt from the screen, other times from the cork/styrofoam. One individual has molted on both surfaces(?), so it seems like it's an acceptable molting surface as long as there's still proper molting space. No one has made it to adulthood yet and they still have several molts to go, which should give me plenty of time to monitor how well the screen works!
     
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  14. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    @Nephila Edulis Charinus are smooth-surface-climbers and can molt even on the walls of your container. They will benefit from having some sort of vertical surface in the enclosure anyway (cork, foam etc'), but I wouldn't worry about it too much.
     
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  15. Thanks for the added information. It is interesting that some will use both surfaces. I might have to try some screen in the future.
     
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  16. Nephila Edulis

    Nephila Edulis Arachnoknight Active Member

    And hiding places? The seller does say that they can be kept in a communal setup successfully and cannibalism doesn't happen often if they're well fed, but if I do keep two or three together and they end up breeding, I feel like the younger animals would be safer if there were several hiding places from the adults
     
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  17. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    The requirement for hiding places depends on the size of your enclosure. If it is large, the whip spider will feel exposed and so yes, it would benefit from hiding spots. But you will see it less (more like, never). In a small setup with a vertical surface they do not need a hiding spot. Now as for keeping them communally, that seems to be the direction most people are trying to take with their inverts, and I advise against it. True, Charinus are sometimes found in the wild in close proximity to each other, but they are still predators and prey abundance in the wild is much greater than in your enclosure. There is a greater chance for cannibalism under captive conditions. If you want to keep 3 of them together you will need a large setup to give each one its space, plus hiding spots, plus a lot of prey. But untouched prey can interfere with molting process of individuals and create problems later. In other words, you will have less control using such a setup.
     
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  18. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoangel Active Member

    I have found that this problem can be mitigated with careful positioning of hiding spots. I had several logs against the side of my terrarium, and my whipspider would always sit on the side of the log closest to the glass. It was thus always visible. At night it was very active, and it was my impression that the size of the enclosure was part of the reason (on that, though, I have no experience).
     
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  19. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    Of course like you said, there are ways around this. A hiding spot resting against the transparent wall of the container works well.

    Activity patterns are more genus- or species-specific rather than space-related. For example Heterophrynus batesii, Charon grayi and Acanthophrynus are VERY active, whereas Heterophrynus armiger, most Damon species, Charinus and most Phrynus species are much less active. This also changes from individual to individual. Some are bold and others are shy.
     
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  20. I'm going to use styrofoam for all my arboreal inverts except tarantulas. I'll see how it goes.