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About to freak out.

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Mariner1, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. Mariner1

    Mariner1 Arachnosquire

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    Today at noon is officially 14 days since I last saw my T. psychedelicus. I figured, hey shes going to molt and come back out all gorgeous and shiny like always. I'm about to start a search and rescue for her in her little container. Please universe, don't do this!
     
  2. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    I don't own that species in particular, but two weeks underground isn't all that long...
     
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  3. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    That's nothing. Leave it be. No need to helicopter if cage conditions are fine.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoknight Active Member

    It's no longer called that anymore, its called Haploclastus devamatha now. And you shouldn't be worried at all, because that's nothing compared to most other T.'s.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    Two weeks is nothing! I have spiders that I haven't seen in months. That is normal tarantula behavior, particularly if they are getting close to a molt. Sometimes they'll hunker down in their burrows for weeks or months at a time just because they want a little "me time" or whatever, even if they are not ready to molt, and will eventually emerge hungry but exactly the same size they were before they went down.

    Resist the temptation to dig for your spider. If she actually is in active molt, disturbing her could result in a crippling or even fatal bad molt. Just keep the water dish full and avoid leaving live feeders running around in the cage, as a hungry roach or superworm or cricket can kill a molting tarantula. Wait to feed her until she emerges on her own - or, if she's a sling, leave prekilled prey and remove it the next day if it remains uneaten.
     
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  6. MissouriArachnophile

    MissouriArachnophile Arachnosquire Active Member

    The benefit of having them dig near the side of the enclosure, at least you can keep an eye on them and watch what they are doing in there.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Yep, a few days after I got my T (was then a 1 inch sling), it barricaded itself for about 4 months. That was rough but something that helped me is I got other spiders (I just caught wild true spiders) and set them near her enclosure so I could still see someone doing something :).
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
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  8. Mariner1

    Mariner1 Arachnosquire

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    OK, thanks for the support and advice. I will be patient, BUT, BUT, she is in a Large vial. This is so scary, losing a T of this caliber. i have 42 of them, but, well yall know what i'm saying.
     
  9. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Maybe after your T reappears (and has hardened if it molted) you could try a smaller container? It might not hide as much for you then.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
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  10. ComputerDellLI

    ComputerDellLI Arachnopeon

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    Same thing with me, except there's this tiny house spider that's been living in my P. muticus' enclosure for over a month now. She's closed the curtains on her burrow, so I just watch the house spider harass crickets that are like eight times it's size that I offer every other day or so.
     
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  11. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnopeon Active Member

    Let Nature, aka your pretty little T, do whatever it's gonna do. But perhaps when she reemerges you can attempt to redistribute the substrate in the vial and poke some "starter burrows" in the sides along the walls of the vial so when she goes underground again there's a chance she'll still be visible.
     
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  12. 8LeggedLair

    8LeggedLair Arachnoknight Active Member

    Totally normal for this species... mainly they are Fossorial, you bought an expensive pet hole, my buds disappears in its black hole of doom for months at a time
     
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  13. MikeofBorg

    MikeofBorg Arachnosquire

    My Aphonopelma seemanni was underground 5 months plus one pre molt. And that isn't even that long for some other species. Especially from genus Aphonopelma and Brachypelma from what I have read.

    My C. lividus Cobalt Blue was a pet hole until I put one of those plastic rock hides in her enclosure. Now she acts terrestrial when before she was always underground. I only ever saw the tips of her front two legs and pedipalps sticking out of her burrow when she was hungry. Now I just look in the hide and there she is.

    93B8D846-F9BF-4C73-B6C1-734C074A9387.jpeg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
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  14. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnobaron Active Member

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    Lol, I love the different house spiders. They can be so entertaining :p.
     
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  15. MikeofBorg

    MikeofBorg Arachnosquire

    I had one in my A. seemanni enclosure and it was gravid. I moved it and the sack out to a bush this past summer. It was in the enclosure for months.
     
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  16. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnobaron Active Member

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    It's awesome when that kind of stuff happens! Love seeing the mammas with their egg sacs <3. Had an Agelenopsis sp. lay a sac last year and she would spend so much time caring for it that it was just one of my favorite things to watch.
     
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