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A.Versicolor Enclosure question

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by EchoingZen, May 1, 2012.

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    Here is a picture of my new enclosure. Is this a little too big for him (He's 0.5 inches)? He's tucked away in the corner and has not started webbing yet. I know I'd be a little upset if someone came and destroyed my home, but I had to do what I had to do. He actually dropped a little poo on me.
    IMG_20120430_203204.jpg

    I'm worried about his food situation. I have small crickets which are larger than his abdomen. I've been freezing them for about 30-45 minutes and leaving them in his enclosure. When I first did this, it was sucked dry and it was about his size. I was amazed that he ate the whole thing. It's been a week later and I don't think he has eaten since. Is this normal? I try every two to three days. I unfortunately cannot find any places that sell fruit flies. Should I continue what I am doing, or should I really attempt to get some fruit flies?

    He's (maybe she) so damn cute. *squeal*
     
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  2. Giygas

    Giygas Arachnosquire

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    Well, first off, I would add a strip of bark for some climbing space. It will be easier for it to start off a home.
    Its abdomen looks pretty fat, so I think shes just full from that big cricket you have her.

    She looks healthy, and if you add some more climbing material, she'll feel even more at home.
    Ill be buying a versi in June, was going to buy one this week but they took a bit of time to show up and I was worried the other sp. I wanted would sell out, oh well, at least ill be getting an N.chromatus along with it ;)
     
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  3. Toogledoo

    Toogledoo Arachnoknight Arachnosupporter

    Looks good to me, but I do agree to maybe add some more climbing material. I also agree that it may be full. Or even possibly premolt. In my experience, Versis grow decently fast.
     
  4. hamhock 74

    hamhock 74 Arachnobaron

    No need to get fruit flies and no need to freeze the crickets either.
     
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  5. grayzone

    grayzone Arachnoking

    excellent advice +1
     
  6. Giygas

    Giygas Arachnosquire

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  7. Ok, so you guys were dead on about him being premolt. He molted a couple days ago and I have been leaving him alone.

    I now have a few other problems. I am the worst spider keeper ever. :(
    I was attempting to get his molting out of his webbing since it was occupying a majority of it space and his whole webbing came with it. Worse still, when I attempted to restore at least a small bit of it, he slipped out and took a fall. It was about 3 feet onto a thick carpeting. He doesn't appear injured, but he is very tiny so it's possible that I can't see anything. I could not feel worse right now and I'm in a bit of a panic. Any recommendations?
     
  8. Anonymity82

    Anonymity82 Arachnoprince

    Step one: Leave spider alone for about a week. Maybe a quick, lite spray if it looks too dry.

    Step two: Don't panic.

    Step three: Learn lesson (over care can be detrimental to tarantulas). :)



    The little guy is probably fine from a 3 foot fall to a carpeted floor because he's so small, also he's an arboreal with tons of "hair" that create some resistance from the drop thus slowing his fall, albeit just a small amount.

    Don't try to feed for around 4-7 days after his molt.

    If you destroy their webbing accidentally they will just have to make more. My Avic hasn't even webbed more than a little bit since I got her two weeks ago!! She's eating though.

    Also, my A. avic is only about .5-.75" right now but has no problem catching little crickets. I wouldn't call them pin heads either, they don't like it :p.
     
  9. Toogledoo

    Toogledoo Arachnoknight Arachnosupporter

    Just leave it alone for a few days. Don't let it get too dry. I've had problems with my slings getting dehydrated after molting and dying. I live in a very very dry place. The fall may not have done any harm, just wait a few days and see. Also, I wouldn't really worry too much about removing the molts. I've never had a problem leaving them in with them. Nobody's perfect, just learn from your mistakes. I'm sure he'll be fine. Good luck! :)
     
  10. Man, I hope you guys are right. I just want my little guy to be all awesome. :)

    If this is what being a parent feels like, I empathize with parents everywhere.
     
  11. Anonymity82

    Anonymity82 Arachnoprince

    It's not a guarantee that your tarantula will live a long happy life, but it is all you can do for now.
     
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  12. sbullet

    sbullet Arachnoknight

    Looks a lot fatter than my purpurea, who only will eat legs-- likely because I don't have pinheads small enough for her. no need to worry. Also, as mine refuses to eat in his "regular home," I normally put it into a pill container filled almost to the top with sub, and then drop in the crick leg so it doesn't have to look as hard. Generally I will only keep her in the food chamber for less than 48 hours and if it doesn't eat, try again in 4 or 5 days.

    But that is just from my experience-- It's normal home is about the size of your container, and has refused food in that so far. (Apprx >.5'' A. purpurea)
     
  13. grayzone

    grayzone Arachnoking

    even if the worst should happen, you cant say that you didnt take advice and try your best. The t potentially being unhappy/dying isnt a reflection on you if you did all you could for it. A ton of people talk about Avicularia genus/genera in particular dying, so as long as youre doing all you feel is right your ok in my book..... Any updates BTW?
     
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  14. sbullet

    sbullet Arachnoknight

    Idk what your worried about at the moment your sling looks great from the looks of its behind
     
  15. Well, small update. He doesn't seem to be displaying any behavior that would worry me. I suppose the only exception would be that he still hasn't eaten. I placed a frozen cricket in his webbing and there it sat. I figured the guy would be starving after not eating for so long. I am still amazed out big he grew with just one molting! He is really pacing around his enclosure a bit.

    I should get a new picture of him soon.
     
  16. Storm76

    Storm76 Arachnoemperor

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    Excuse me, a "frozen cricket" ?! I've heard and read a LOT of stuff regarding feeders, but not once something about freezing crickets...get pinhead crickets and drop an ALIVE one in there, the little bugger will get it if he's hungry...
     
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  17. grayzone

    grayzone Arachnoking

    +1 jan.. these arent snakes lol
     
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  18. Storm76

    Storm76 Arachnoemperor

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    Quite frankly, but I'd like to know where the hell that information about feeding "frozen crickets" came from in the 1st place?! Never once have I heard that BS...because that's right what it is, sorry.
     
  19. Hobo

    Hobo ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) Staff Member

    While it is probably easier/better to feed it live, feeding frozen (not freeze dried) is a valid way to feed (though it would be a good idea if it's thawed first!). Slings and even adults will scavenge. The only issue is that uneaten prey must be removed soon if not taken, as they turn into soup.

    I remember someone on here who did that, since the closest LPS was hours away and crickets died off too quickly. IIRC, Joe also did this to feed his H. gigas (I think it was?) communal.
    I've done this too in the past, to try it out. Frankly, cutting up larger crickets is better and less messy, ironically.

    It ain't bullcrap. Don't knock it 'till you've tried it.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2012