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A Seemanni behaviour

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Martin2491, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. Martin2491

    Martin2491 Arachnopeon

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    Hi, so as researched, my A. Seemanni's enclosure includes a burrow if he/she wants to use it, a water bowl with dry coco fibre substrate. Everytime I refill the water bowl I will overflow it just so the substrate dampance. Also, now its Autumn in the UK, temperatures are dropping so I'm keeping the room at 20-24° during day/evening. At night the temperatures have dropped down to around 11-12°. Is any of this I'm doing incorrect? Because, he/she is STILL in the corner of the enclosure with her legs hiding her body. He/she is 3-4" with an enclosure of 30x30x30. In any case could this enclosure be too big? I've read that of enclosures are too big they can become stressed...
     
  2. Axolotl

    Axolotl Arachnopeon

    I'm not an expert by any means, but my A. seemanni had similar behavior until she excavated her burrow. I tried dry substrate to start, but she wouldn't dig; she just sat in the corners. I started using damp substrate in new enclosures so she could dig and build her burrow. Once it dried and her burrow "set up" so to speak, then I went to the overflowing water bowl technique. She really was quite the architect, but she showed no interest in flower pot hides or cork bark. She was most comfortable in her elaborate tunnels.
     
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  3. ghostly

    ghostly Arachnopeon Active Member

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    11-12° is very low for most Ts. I keep all of my Ts including my A. seemanni female at room temperature, making sure that temperatures don't drop under 20° C all year. My A. Seemanni appreciates slightly moister substrate than for example most Brachypelma or Grammostola, so I keep around 1/3 - 1/2 of the substrate damp at all times. Mine is great at digging (almost semi-fossorial lol), so I recommend a lot of substrate. My opinion on enclosure size is that, although smaller enclosures are fine and the spider usually doesn't mind, larger enclosures can also work, if they are well structured, there's an appropriate hide, enough substrate and cover, and your T feels secure. Could you post a pic of your enclosure? Then I'm sure some experienced keepers can give you tips on how to make it perfect for your T. :shame:
    How long have you had her? It's normal for them to take some time and feel a bit stressed until they settle in properly.
     
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  4. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnoprince Active Member

    Please post pictures of the enclosure. It sounds as if you have an Exo Terra cube, and that one is definitely not suitable for an A. seemanni.
    This species needs deep, slightly moist substrate.

    Also, 11-12°C is definitely too low in the long run, on occasions and for a short period of time it'll be okay, but not every night. Does your flat really get that cold at night? I can hardly believe that. o_O
     
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  5. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnonovelist-musician-artist Arachnosupporter

    How are you not so cold you can't sleep at those temperatures? The rule of thumb is that (generally) if the average person can handle the temperature of the room than so can the T; meaning that any temperature we're comfortable at the T is also comfortable. But 11-12˚C is way too cold.If that is indeed the case you'll have to get a cheap wooden cabinet and put aluminum paper sheeting on the back. Then setup a heat mat attached to the aluminum backing and make sure it has a really good failsafe setting in place so that the temps don't get above 31˚C or so. This is the 'indirect heating' method for emergency heating for tarantulas and it is pretty much the only way you can safely use a heat mat with a tarantula. You want to heat the air between the tarantula cage and the back of the cabinet. NEVER put a heat mat directly against a tarantula cage. The risk of them cooking themselves is just too great. There are many good instructions with photos on this site of how to set up this type of heating.
     
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  6. Martin2491

    Martin2491 Arachnopeon

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    The heater isn't on in the room yet, so during early hours it did get to those low temperatures, I will send pics in my next thread to show you, there is plenty of substrate for it to burrow also, I've had her around 3 months within that time she has molted and started to eat with no problems, s/he should by now be settled right? Thankyou

    Hi,
    Hi, yes it is an exo terra, I do have plenty of substrate, however it is more dry than moist. Do the exo terras allow too much ventilation then? Yeah without the heating on during early hours, it will get that low..

    Haha, yes, I'm warm blooded. During early hours of the night we don't have the heating on as it's at comfortable temperature for me. I want to try and avoid using any other type of heating as probably using the bedroom heating is the best/easiest option.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 12, 2019
  7. Thekla

    Thekla Arachnoprince Active Member

    Sorry, but with an Exo Terra (the one with the front doors) you just can't have enough substrate, it's not possible, because the doors in the front only allow for about 10cm. You have an obligate burrower at your hand and (s)he will need more substrate.

    Those enclosures also pose a high fall risk for a terrestrial species. The height/space between the substrate and the top shouldn't be more than 1,5x DLS of your T. Otherwise (s)he could seriously be injured if (s)he climbs and falls. And please don't tell me your T will never climb, because they will... especially if the enclosure isn't appropriate.

    Next thing on the list would be the mesh lid, which you most probably haven't replaced with an acrylic one. They can get stuck with their tarsal claws in the mesh, which poses another threat of injury.

    All in all those Exo Terras are not suitable for a terrestrial T, especially not for a burrower like yours. Sell it or get yourself an arboreal T for it. ;)
    I would recommend getting an appropriate faunarium/kritter keeper or a tall RUB (=really useful box), fill it with loads (!) of moist (not wet) substrate, make a starter burrow under a piece of cork bark and rehouse your A. seemanni presently. :)
     
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  8. Martin2491

    Martin2491 Arachnopeon

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    With pics I can show you better what I mean by plenty of substrate. Because yes you're right, the doors aren't at a high level, however the substrate is sloped up at the back and middle, I will definitely take into consideration what you've said anyway and buy a plastic critter keeper. They're inexpensive as well.

    Also, because the temperatures drop that low, would the best option be to buy a heat pad - using appropriately.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 12, 2019